Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

Carcross/Tagish First Nation

Sensitive Ecosystem Mapping & Holistic Land Use Planning

Carcross/Tagish First Nation (CTFN) is a Tlingit self-governing First Nation that began the process of Holistic Land Planning in 2012. An Environmental Scan began in December of 2012 with the goal of synthesizing all current, historical and relevant data. Nearing completion, the final steps include; sensitive ecosystem mapping, community engagement, implementation planning and finalization of the land use plan. Work will be conducted exclusively in the BC portion of the Traditional Territory (TT) addressing the habitat needs of identified species at risk through the development of a land use plan for the conservation and preservation of these valuable areas. The benefits of this project will extend beyond the Southern Lakes area; facilitating proactive ecosystem based planning and management, meeting the priorities of the Carcross/Tagish First Nation, the priorities and recommendations of the Southern Lakes Wildlife Coordinating Committee, planning and research priorities of Species at Risk Management Plans and will assist in the conservation and protection of critical habitat.
$50,000.00
2014

Ecojustice Canada Society

A Tale of Two Pipelines: Securing Legal Protections for British Columbia

Ecojustice represented Raincoast Conservation Foundation, Living Oceans Society and ForestEthics Advocacy at National Energy Board (NEB) hearings for Enbridge’s Northern Gateway pipelines. We submitted expert evidence on environmental threats and argued the project was not in the public interest. In July, the federal government approved the project, and we have now brought three legal actions: one alleging the review panel’s recommendation was based on a flawed environmental assessment and two challenging government approval and NEB certificates to authorize the project. Ecojustice is also representing Raincoast Conservation Foundation and Living Oceans Society in the regulatory review of the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion. We will focus on environmental risks while raising awareness of barriers to a transparent and participatory process. As a result of 2012 amendments to the National Energy Board Act, the review is compressed and will not include cross examinations or community hearings. We have been preparing for Kinder Morgan’s formal project application since 2011.
$60,000.00
2014

Species and Ecosystem Protection Act for BC, Years 2 and 3

To conduct research and policy analysis to provide technical support to the BC Species at Risk Working Group. Legal activities will also leverage media as part of a public outreach campaign to secure a Species and Ecosystem Protection Act in BC. Ecojustice’s interdisciplinary approach and leadership will demonstrate the need for additional legislative protection for BC species and habitat.
$50,000.00
2010

Georgia Strait Alliance

Building community strength and resilience to oil spills in vulnerable coastal areas

This project represents a social innovation that can be executed within a medium-term timeframe and contributes to an over-arching societal shift - away from a belief system that accepts as inevitable our dependence on fossil fuels and towards a system which acknowledges the inherent risks in this dependence and works toward a clean energy future. In a time of growing concerns about global climate change and with our increasing recognition of the local impacts of oil spills, this project works from the ground up to change how communities prepare for and invest in local oil spill response and stand together to voice their opposition to projects like Kinder Morgan’s pipeline expansion. Kinder Morgan’s proposal would greatly increase the risk of a spill that would devastate local communities and ecosystems and significantly contribute to climate change. By working with local governments and individuals to identify and address gaps in local oil spill preparedness and response, the project will address the imbalance of resources, power and knowledge that currently prevents local governments from adequately planning for oil spills. This will increase the ability of vulnerable communities, and the people who will be most directly affected by a spill, to have a voice in creating a strengthened spill response regime which will protect and restore their local natural habitats and ecosystems and foster community resilience.
$54,000.00
2015

Pembina Foundation for Environmental Research and Education

Engaging British Columbians in shaping our collective climate legacy

This year, project staff met with 150+ organizations to better understand why & how these groups might wish to engage on climate policy. Several have become central allies. Clean Energy BC (power producers), Green Jobs BC (labour+NGOs), Climate Smart (businesses), the Bowen Group (high-emission industries + ENGOs), the Urban Development Institute (building developers), Union of BC Municipalities, Organizing for Change (ENGOs) and others have worked with us to highlight opportunities to advance climate policy collectively with their members. We are seeking funding for a 3-year Test Grant to strategically expand & deepen the participation of British Columbians in climate action. This will also allow us to respond to more requests from grassroots groups, First Nations and community leaders to provide analysis and assistance on development issues relevant to them. With climate policy windows officially open federally and provincially, groups can now advocate effectively (using a GHG emissions lens) on issues such as pipelines, tankers, fracking, LNG, etc. We will test & expand our engagement, by partnering with key allies across strategic sectors (e.g., buildings, industry, ENGOs, labour, local government, First Nations, grassroots groups and media) to engage their networks in shaping climate policy. This work will change “how we act”, “money, knowledge & people”, and “laws, policies & rules”, and in promoting a more engaged society, will inform our “values & beliefs".
$50,000.00
2016

Communities, Water & Carbon: Mitigating shale gas impacts in northeast BC

Shale gas development in northeast BC will significantly increase with the emergence of an export-oriented LNG industry. At the same time, the current regulatory framework is insufficient to protect communities from the negative impacts of hydraulic fracturing (fracking). Initial conversations with First Nations and community leaders in the northeast indicate that impacted communities would welcome information to enhance understanding of technologies, policies and best practices that could reduce the impact on water (quality and quantity – which are serious local concerns) and climate (GHG emissions). We propose to undertake research and engagement to reduce upstream shale gas development impacts in northeast BC: to provide accessible research findings and communications tools to First Nations and communities; to undertake coordinated outreach to strengthen networks across the north and to increase public awareness across the province; and to promote policies and practices with the provincial government and industry in collaboration with leaders in northeast BC.
$60,000.00
2014

PHS Community Services Society

Creating Bee Space

Our mandate is to enhance community through apiculture and to connect people & pollinators. We believe in the therapeutic value of beekeeping, its ability to connect all people to community, to nature and to themselves. We bring bees into marginalized urban communities and manage them side by side with community members through our mentorship program; we create green spaces and green opportunities for training, employment and education; we diversify our ecosystem by supporting pollinators and increase our food security by pollination of local food and production of local honey. The bee hive is the centre point of our programming, out from which a spectrum of opportunity radiates. The bees are an incredibly fertile substrate for meaningful connection, green skills training and access to nature. Our programming is socially innovative in its ability to reach out and connect to those considered hard-to-reach, welcoming and supporting individuals and their communities, building bridges of communication, de-stigmatizing bees and people and taking leadership in environmental stewardship. There is a wealth of opportunity in the city for bees and people of all kinds, and our project is helping our city to realize its potential and be a model for other cities. This project will grow our ability to offer meaningful programming that builds community capacity to support native pollinators & honey bees; extend our programming to new geographies & peoples; and embeds us in our community.
$50,000.00
2015

SFU - Centre for Dialogue

Expanding renewable energy in BC through Climate Action Plan 2.0

In May, the Government of British Columbia created a new climate leadership team to recommend policies that would help ensure it meets its legislated 2020 and 2050 greenhouse gas reduction targets. The team’s recommendations, due in December, will form the basis of what the government is calling its Climate Leadership Plan—a set of policies to be included in the 2016 budget. The province understands that new policy will be needed across the economy to achieve its targets; this newly opened policy window offers an excellent opportunity to boost clean and renewable energy development and deployment in the province. The province has been clear that it needs the public to ask for climate solutions now; this is key in that there has been little to no political space open for such a discussion over the past three years. We believe that an immediate, targeted communications and engagement effort can help ensure that the Climate Leadership Plan fully delivers on its potential. We intend to build the evidence base and communicate the benefits of a prosperous low-carbon provincial economy. We will do this by developing and amplifying economic arguments, insightful analyses, and good-news stories about the development and deployment of clean energy. We aim to develop a positive, engaged, and geographically diverse constituency to inspire and inform a suite of strong new climate policies. We will then convey this feedback to government via a series of briefings.
$55,000.00
2015

Tides Canada Initiatives Society

Hartley Bay Great Bear LIVE

The Gitga’at First Nation, located in Hartley Bay on the north coast of B.C., have developed land and marine use plans for their territory that include as key principles: protecting ecosystem integrity, ensuring their unique and rich culture is preserved and enhancing their capacity to engage in research and resource management. Gitga’at entities have requested that PWI collaboratively develop and deploy a Great Bear LIVE remote camera project in Gitga’at territory. Great Bear LIVE is a technologically advanced remote monitoring system developed by PWI to monitor terrestrial and marine wildlife through video and audio which can be streamed live online for broader public engagement and education. This project will meet 2 key community-identified objectives: 1. To employ non-invasive research and broad-based public education tools to further environmental protection, understanding and long term monitoring of Gitga’at traditional territory. 2. To engage and prepare youth as future stewards of Gitga’at territory by providing training in technology,wildlife monitoring and stewardship.
$60,000.00
2014

Yellowstone to Yukon Conservation Initiative

Upstream, Downstream: A Collaborative Approach to Cumulative Effects

A Murray River Watershed Working Group (WWG) led by First Nations as stewards of the land, with resource companies, Y2Y, provincial government and other technical, academic and community representatives invited as appropriate, will use facilitated meetings and a series of 4-5 community workshops to deepen mutual understanding of the local and broader context and shape the CEA Framework. Together they will forge a common agenda and agree on the CEA Framework scope, process and timeframes, with the workshops helping to flesh it out and draw on local and traditional ecological knowledge. This will root the Framework in the values of the communities that use the 175km-long Murray River—specifically First Nations communities – but also take into account broader community and resource needs and industrial, academic, technical and government input. Saulteau First Nations, West Moberly First Nations and MacLeod Lake Indian Band have already confirmed their WWG representation. This project will bring together people who share an interest in the great natural resources of the Peace region, but who may have quite different perspectives, to collaboratively create a CEA Framework and process, which will ultimately inform and enable a more balanced and integrated land-use approach. It will also provide an innovative model for cross-sector working on land-use planning that reflects and respects aboriginal rights and values, supporting their continued use and enjoyment of the land.
$55,000.00
2016

Peace-Making: Advancing Conservation Outcomes in BC's Peace River Break

Since 2008 Y2Y has led an effort to raise awareness about, and support conservation of the Peace River Break (PRB). This culminated in a successful conference in March 2012, at which more than 50 individuals validated work to date and contributed to future plans. Y2Y will build upon this work to advance a shared conservation vision for the PRB. We will finalize a conservation agenda that will preserve sufficient intact lands to maintain connectivity for wildlife and ecosystem services for human communities. Through a new and significant partnership with the University of Northern BC, we will establish a repository of accessible regional spatial information, and initiate an assessment of wildlife mortality hotspots, especially along Highway 97 through Pine Pass. We will push the BC government to complete the proposed Peace-Boudreau Park. We will involve local First Nations in these efforts. We will communicate about the importance of the region and strengthen the connections among its communities. We will build the long-term capacity of local organizations to carry on this work.
$50,000.00
2013

Keeping the Peace Fully Wild

The Peace River Break is the only connection between the abundant wildlife of northern BC and the Rocky Mountain Parks. This key ecosystem is currently threatened by poorly-planned road networks, coal mines, hydroelectric projects and other renewable energy developments which are outpacing the understanding of the area’s value to wildlife and traditional land uses. This project will raise awareness among decision makers of the region’s ecological importance and build the capacity of local organizations to advance policies and practices that protect and restore the vitality of the Peace River Break.
$60,000.00
2011