Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

Ecojustice Canada Society

Protecting Marine Habitat and Orcas in the Salish Sea

In June 2016, Ecojustice launched a legal challenge of the National Energy Board’s (NEB) report and recommendation to approve Kinder Morgan’s pipeline expansion. As participants in the two year review, we filed uncontroverted evidence of harm to at-risk southern resident killer whales. For one, Kinder Morgan concedes it cannot mitigate noise impacts on the whales from a seven-fold increase in tanker traffic, as is required under SARA. Also, Raincoast (our client) filed a study showing that if the project is approved, there is a greater than 50 percent probability that the whale population will drop below 30 in the next 100 years, tantamount to extinction. We aim to set a clear precedent that regulators cannot avoid their legal responsibility to protect endangered species. T2 will add a second container terminal in deep-water by Delta—directly within southern resident killer whale critical habitat. By 2030, the expansion will increase container ship transits through Vancouver’s port and shipping channels by 500 vessels per year. Ecojustice is representing four clients as participants in the environmental assessment for T2. A review panel was recently appointed to conduct a hearing and submit a report and recommendation to Canada’s Minister of Environment and Climate Change, likely by the end of 2017. We will work with our clients and their experts to submit evidence on how increases to vessel traffic will affect southern resident killer whales and other marine species.
$70,000.00
2016

A Tale of Two Pipelines: Securing Legal Protections for British Columbia

Ecojustice represented Raincoast Conservation Foundation, Living Oceans Society and ForestEthics Advocacy at National Energy Board (NEB) hearings for Enbridge’s Northern Gateway pipelines. We submitted expert evidence on environmental threats and argued the project was not in the public interest. In July, the federal government approved the project, and we have now brought three legal actions: one alleging the review panel’s recommendation was based on a flawed environmental assessment and two challenging government approval and NEB certificates to authorize the project. Ecojustice is also representing Raincoast Conservation Foundation and Living Oceans Society in the regulatory review of the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion. We will focus on environmental risks while raising awareness of barriers to a transparent and participatory process. As a result of 2012 amendments to the National Energy Board Act, the review is compressed and will not include cross examinations or community hearings. We have been preparing for Kinder Morgan’s formal project application since 2011.
$60,000.00
2014

Pembina Foundation for Environmental Research and Education

Communities, Water & Carbon: Mitigating shale gas impacts in northeast BC

Shale gas development in northeast BC will significantly increase with the emergence of an export-oriented LNG industry. At the same time, the current regulatory framework is insufficient to protect communities from the negative impacts of hydraulic fracturing (fracking). Initial conversations with First Nations and community leaders in the northeast indicate that impacted communities would welcome information to enhance understanding of technologies, policies and best practices that could reduce the impact on water (quality and quantity – which are serious local concerns) and climate (GHG emissions). We propose to undertake research and engagement to reduce upstream shale gas development impacts in northeast BC: to provide accessible research findings and communications tools to First Nations and communities; to undertake coordinated outreach to strengthen networks across the north and to increase public awareness across the province; and to promote policies and practices with the provincial government and industry in collaboration with leaders in northeast BC.
$60,000.00
2014

Raincoast Conservation Foundation

Restoring Governance for Salmon Conservation in the Lower Fraser River and Estuary

This project addresses the failure of governments and agencies to protect salmon habitat in the Lower Fraser River and Estuary. This failure has come at the detriment of globally significant salmon runs and the First Nations, local communities, economies and other wildlife that rely on these fish. A huge opportunity now exists to test governance and funding models for delivering a First Nations and community-lead initiative that envisions salmon resilience in the Lower Fraser. Using salmon as the indicator for freshwater sustainability, an initiative focused on habitat conservation will guide planning, restoration and management, facilitating recovery of a degraded river and its salmon.
$70,000.00
2017

Sierra Club of British Columbia Foundation

Coastal First Nations Regional Monitoring Strategy

This project aims to increase the capacity of First Nations to monitor and steward important cultural and natural values in their territories by implementing a coordinated approach to gathering data and monitoring impacts. Phase two of this project will help to ensure data collected is used in planning and decision-making; explore mobile technologies to increase effectiveness of data collection and analysis and provide ongoing training and support to communities to integrate the project.
$65,000.00
2010

Tides Canada Initiatives Society

Campaign Accelerator

Campaign Accelerator (“CA”) seeks to change how people act in the political arena to ensure their environmental values are a key part of the debate. CA’s theory of change is that if organizations visibly mobilize pro-environment voters on election day, then government and opposition will be more inclined to strengthen environmental protection because they believe those voters can be decisive in elections. As parties see how their stance on various environmental issues helped or hurt them in the election in key parts of the Province, government will become more positively responsive to those issues and see the value of a strong environmental track record, resulting in better laws and policies. Engagement organizing (“EO”) is based on the belief that “organized people beats organized money.” BC’s tanker campaign is a prime example, particularly the work of Dogwood Initiative to mobilize thousands through locally-grounded organizing nodes across the Province. The 2013 BC election saw all parties wanting to “look strong” on tankers in response to this force. CA flips this approach on its head: training and mentoring grassroots leaders so they can apply EO tools on local environmental issues. CA is building a network of community leaders using EO to enable local citizens to hold their elected officials to account and ensure government recognizes that environmental values (beyond big campaigns like tankers) are widespread and can move voters. The 2017 election is a first test.
$70,000.00
2016

Hartley Bay Great Bear LIVE

The Gitga’at First Nation, located in Hartley Bay on the north coast of B.C., have developed land and marine use plans for their territory that include as key principles: protecting ecosystem integrity, ensuring their unique and rich culture is preserved and enhancing their capacity to engage in research and resource management. Gitga’at entities have requested that PWI collaboratively develop and deploy a Great Bear LIVE remote camera project in Gitga’at territory. Great Bear LIVE is a technologically advanced remote monitoring system developed by PWI to monitor terrestrial and marine wildlife through video and audio which can be streamed live online for broader public engagement and education. This project will meet 2 key community-identified objectives: 1. To employ non-invasive research and broad-based public education tools to further environmental protection, understanding and long term monitoring of Gitga’at traditional territory. 2. To engage and prepare youth as future stewards of Gitga’at territory by providing training in technology,wildlife monitoring and stewardship.
$60,000.00
2014

Wildsight Living Lakes Canada

Citizen Science Series

Outcomes will help influence systemic change through: 1. Normalizing active water stewardship with robust, scientifically defensible monitoring protocols that have been adjusted to be accessible and user friendly for citizen scientists. 2. Strengthened community understanding and engagement on the inter-relationship between land use, climate change and watershed health and that this stewardship is a collective responsibility. 3. Inform existing and newly emerging watershed and land use management policies, practices and pluralistic frameworks at the municipal, regional or sub-basin level. Our Citizen Science Series is an important initiative to engage, train and empower citizens and community groups to collect water data for policy implementation within their communities in lakes, rivers, wetlands, aquifers and glacial environments. We use provincial and federal protocols such as the Canadian Aquatic Biomonitoring Network in rivers and will be testing the adaptation of the protocol in partnership with Environment Canada to assess wetland health. We use Provincial Ambient Water Monitoring and Groundwater Protocols, and will be testing citizen science protocols for blue-green algae and glacial monitoring, which has not been done before in BC. We will work with the Adaptation to Climate Team - SFU and our science advisory board to implement and test the ability to asses climate change impacts within each of the monitoring protocols we use.
$65,000.00
2016

Yellowstone to Yukon Conservation Initiative

Keeping the Peace Fully Wild

The Peace River Break is the only connection between the abundant wildlife of northern BC and the Rocky Mountain Parks. This key ecosystem is currently threatened by poorly-planned road networks, coal mines, hydroelectric projects and other renewable energy developments which are outpacing the understanding of the area’s value to wildlife and traditional land uses. This project will raise awareness among decision makers of the region’s ecological importance and build the capacity of local organizations to advance policies and practices that protect and restore the vitality of the Peace River Break.
$60,000.00
2011