Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

Britannia Community Services Centre Society

Thingery - A Lending Library of Things

Equipment lending libraries are proven models for reducing a neighbourhood's ecological footprint. Despite long established lending library organizations in most Canadian cities, lending libraries struggle to scale. We've worked with three neighbourhoods in Vancouver to show that there's an appetite for more lending libraries that are located directly in neighbourhoods. Our project will pilot three equipment lending libraries, called a Thingery, in shipping containers and through donations of underutilized equipment, provide community members with access to equipment that they don't ever need to own.
$75,000.00
2017

David Suzuki Foundation

Protecting the Peace: Enhancing Local Voices in the Greater Peace Break Region

The Peace Break Region supports agriculture and diverse wildlife, including threatened populations of bull trout, grizzly, fisher, and woodland caribou. The region has been severely degraded by logging, mining, oil and gas development and earlier large-scale hydro development. The region's lowlands are dominated by seismic lines, fracking operations, roads, pipeline crossings and other industrial infrastructure that seriously threaten the region's critical ecosystem services that regulate climate, disease outbreaks, and wastes, and that provide aesthetic, recreational and spiritual value. Unfortunately, the true worth of the region's natural capital is often poorly understood by policy-makers. For this reason the DSF and its partner West Moberly FN are proposing to complete a full natural capital valuation that will inventory and enumerate, in dollar terms, the non-market wealth of the region. This research will be accompanied by online mapping and other public engagement tools that will communicate the importance of natural capital to sustaining communities in the north.
$80,000.00
2012

Ecojustice Canada Society

Protecting Marine Habitat and Orcas in the Salish Sea

In June 2016, Ecojustice launched a legal challenge of the National Energy Board’s (NEB) report and recommendation to approve Kinder Morgan’s pipeline expansion. As participants in the two year review, we filed uncontroverted evidence of harm to at-risk southern resident killer whales. For one, Kinder Morgan concedes it cannot mitigate noise impacts on the whales from a seven-fold increase in tanker traffic, as is required under SARA. Also, Raincoast (our client) filed a study showing that if the project is approved, there is a greater than 50 percent probability that the whale population will drop below 30 in the next 100 years, tantamount to extinction. We aim to set a clear precedent that regulators cannot avoid their legal responsibility to protect endangered species. T2 will add a second container terminal in deep-water by Delta—directly within southern resident killer whale critical habitat. By 2030, the expansion will increase container ship transits through Vancouver’s port and shipping channels by 500 vessels per year. Ecojustice is representing four clients as participants in the environmental assessment for T2. A review panel was recently appointed to conduct a hearing and submit a report and recommendation to Canada’s Minister of Environment and Climate Change, likely by the end of 2017. We will work with our clients and their experts to submit evidence on how increases to vessel traffic will affect southern resident killer whales and other marine species.
$70,000.00
2016

Fair Mining Collaborative

Transboundary watershed protection: building relationships, better laws and public awareness

Our work centers on creating strong, respectful relationships between BC First Nations, Alaska Tribes, and NGO’s on both sides of the border to collaboratively change antiquated ineffective mining laws and policy. Knowledge is power. FMC will provide our proven education program to the CTC, including; Fair Mining Practices: A New Mining Code for British Columbia (FMPC), Mine Medicine Manual (MMM), Fair Mining Training Program (FMTP), and the Northern Secwepemc Tribal Council (NSTC) Mining Policy. Many BC communities already use FMC’s products to increase their understanding of the mining regulatory system, and leverage change through shared decision-making and implementation of innovative best management practices that protect their interests. Very diverse users of FMC’s education program, (Amnesty International to the Tsilhqot’in National Government to Argentinian filmmaker Hernan Vilchez to mining industry organizations), have successfully changed conflicted relationships and made effective changes in regulatory systems. Forward thinking mining companies are recognizing First Nations as decision-making equals, knowing their projects must receive a social license from all affected communities, or the economic viability of their project will be jeopardized. Our work proves that sharing effective tools with the most affected groups, can change the status quo rapidly from the ground up, leaving legislators and recalcitrant industry to catch up.
$80,000.00
2016

Global Youth Education Network Society

Next UP grow program

Next UP is our flagship program at genius. Next UP (NU) is an intensive seven-month leadership program for young people age 18-32 who are committed to working on social justice issues, environmental issues and climate change. Next UP began eight years ago in Vancouver and now operates programs in Vancouver, Calgary, Edmonton, Saskatoon, Winnipeg and Ottawa. We have 384 graduates across the country with about 120 of them in BC. After 8 years of delivering and refining the NU program we want to offer new formats and versions of the program to different constituencies over the next three years. Next UP grow will allow us to deepen the scope and impact of our work and grow our network of social change leaders. The full-length NU programs run from September through to the following May. Each fall people apply to get in to the various NU programs and at the end of each selection process 12-16 participants are invited to form a program cohort in each program city. The program is free of cost to all participants and funding dependent we can provide support for childcare and participant travel. The cohort meets 1 evening a week and 1 full Saturday a month over the course of the 7 months and participants do work to explore their own leadership styles, learn about solutions to topical issues, develop key leadership skills and receive training in an array of areas to provide them with an excellent tool kit to draw upon in their respective leadership journeys.
$77,000.00
2015

Meal Exchange

Real Food Challenge B.C.

Meal Exchange will bring together campus, community, and industry partners to leverage the $20M annual purchasing of B.C.’s campuses to drive demand for ecological agricultural practices-- focusing on improving water quality, wildlife habitat, mitigating climate change-- and improve animal welfare. To do this, we are adapting the award-winning Real Food Challenge from the U.S. to B.C. It w ill shift authority and resource flows on campuses, while also changing beliefs systems about the priorities of institutional procurement, through: -The Real Food Campus Commitment: university presidents publicly commit to the goal of purchasing 20% Real Food within 3 years, mandating foodservice companies and campus administration to change procurement practices. -The Real Food Calculator: provides a rigorous definition and process, based on existing industry certifications, to audit purchasing and identify areas of improvement to reach 20% Real Food on campus. Building off one-year seed funding from Real Estate Foundation and Vancity to test the program with 6 pilot campuses, support from Vancouver Foundation will allow us to adapt and sustain this program at all 11 universities in B.C. The Test grant’s funding through 2019 will give us the runway needed to measure results-- developing the evaluation tools and data to demonstrate the impact of campus purchasing on B.C.’s environment-- and establish long-term funding with campuses to scale the program across B.C. and Canada.
$75,000.00
2016

Raincoast Conservation Foundation

Restoring Governance for Salmon Conservation in the Lower Fraser River and Estuary

This project addresses the failure of governments and agencies to protect salmon habitat in the Lower Fraser River and Estuary. This failure has come at the detriment of globally significant salmon runs and the First Nations, local communities, economies and other wildlife that rely on these fish. A huge opportunity now exists to test governance and funding models for delivering a First Nations and community-lead initiative that envisions salmon resilience in the Lower Fraser. Using salmon as the indicator for freshwater sustainability, an initiative focused on habitat conservation will guide planning, restoration and management, facilitating recovery of a degraded river and its salmon.
$70,000.00
2017

Salal Foundation

Beyond Coal Canada

Beyond Coal Canada is a collaborative project to oppose the export of US thermal coal through Canadian ports aimed at averting accelerated climate change for the benefit of future generations and the natural world. Beyond Coal Canada is the Canadian partner in the Power Past Coal coalition that is opposing the transshipment and export of coal from Montana’s Powder River Basin. When Fraser Surrey Docks and Lafarge Quarries first proposed their coal transshipment project in 2012 most observers thought permits would be issued within months and predicted our odds of defeating the project were slim. Our primary goal was to delay approval and construction. Three years later, the proposal is stalled, with important permits in limbo, widespread municipal opposition, organized and grassroots opposition, and a number of lawsuits working their way through the courts. The changed political circumstances have opened up promising new paths to victory, as well as new options for building a foundation to prevent future coal export expansions.
$75,000.00
2015

Simon Fraser University - Faculty of Environment

Low Carbon Resilience: Practitioners as Drivers For Sustainable Communities

Climate change requires us to reduce emissions (mitigation) and prepare for impacts such as flooding, sea level rise and heatwaves (adaptation). To date, climate mitigation and adaptation have been planned separately, but it's clear there are major benefits to integrating them - an approach called low carbon resilience (LCR). As we shift to a low carbon economy and begin upgrading infrastructure to withstand climate impacts, we can save time and money using LCR approaches. This is good news for ecosystems, which are also challenged by climate change, as their health is central to innovative LCR approaches. This project facilitates and supports the role of professionals as LCR champions.
$75,000.00
2017

Tides Canada Initiatives Society

Campaign Accelerator

Campaign Accelerator (“CA”) seeks to change how people act in the political arena to ensure their environmental values are a key part of the debate. CA’s theory of change is that if organizations visibly mobilize pro-environment voters on election day, then government and opposition will be more inclined to strengthen environmental protection because they believe those voters can be decisive in elections. As parties see how their stance on various environmental issues helped or hurt them in the election in key parts of the Province, government will become more positively responsive to those issues and see the value of a strong environmental track record, resulting in better laws and policies. Engagement organizing (“EO”) is based on the belief that “organized people beats organized money.” BC’s tanker campaign is a prime example, particularly the work of Dogwood Initiative to mobilize thousands through locally-grounded organizing nodes across the Province. The 2013 BC election saw all parties wanting to “look strong” on tankers in response to this force. CA flips this approach on its head: training and mentoring grassroots leaders so they can apply EO tools on local environmental issues. CA is building a network of community leaders using EO to enable local citizens to hold their elected officials to account and ensure government recognizes that environmental values (beyond big campaigns like tankers) are widespread and can move voters. The 2017 election is a first test.
$70,000.00
2016