Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

Canadian Environmental Grantmaker's Network

Shared Learning in Support of an Environmentally Sound and Sustainable Future

The Canadian Environmental Grantmakers' Network (CEGN) and the Sustainability Network are seeking support for a Shared Learning initiative designed to increase the capacity, effectiveness and collaboration of the environmental community (both non-profits and funders). The proposed initiative will help to equip the environmental community to be more effective agents for the protection of Canada's environment. It will do so through shared learning opportunities which will result in: i) increased knowledge and skills; ii) more effective public communication; and iii) stronger networking and collaboration among members of the environmental community. Bridging the divide between funders and non-profits is central to this initiative. Both the scale of environmental challenges that confront us and the fact that increasing numbers of funders are shifting from 'grant-givers' to 'change-makers' demand a stronger alliance between these two parts of the environmental community.
$33,000.00
2012

Cetus Research & Conservation Society

Southern Vancouver Island Derelict Fishing Gear Removal Project

Derelict fishing gear has an unseen and devastating impact on the marine environment. Since 2002 the Northwest Straits Initiative's Derelict Fishing Gear Program, in Washington state, has removed over 4,000 ghost nets and 2,500 derelict crab pots from Puget Sound. In 2011 the Province of BC removed/disabled derelict crab pots and a seine net from North Pender Island, with a reported 1,799 dead and alive animals recovered. On the southern BC coast, there is currently no ongoing program to remove derelict fishing gear. Cetus Research and Conservation Society would like to become a leader for this work in southern BC waters, working with engaged participants - from fishermen to divers to beachgoers and citizen scientists. Living Oceans Society is developing a project to remove and safely dispose of derelict gear in northern Vancouver Island waters. Cetus will collaborate with Living Oceans Society to share the results of our research, our experiences and lessons learned, resulting in a cohesive approach to derelict fishing gear removal in the waters around Vancouver Island.
$15,000.00
2012

Comox Valley Project Watershed Society

Protecting and Restoring the Courtenay River Estuary

The Estuary Working Group (EWG), representing 13 environmental organisations is currently working on eelgrass and habitat restoration, carbon sequestration research, a National Historic Status bid, and yearly awareness campaigns. The EWG has participated with the Comox Valley Regional District in revising a Courtenay River Estuary Management Plan, originally created in 2000 but never implemented. The revised plan needs the support of local municipalities. They were invited to take part in revising the plan but declined to do so. We propose to create an interactive animated 3D map of the estuary to illustrate changes over time, the problems that need to be addressed and present various scenarios for resolving these challenges. The complexity and interconnectedness of the estuary’s ecosystems, examples of economic development compatible with a healthy functioning estuary, and potential social and recreational benefits will be highlighted. In creating the map we intend to engage local officials, planners, and other stakeholders in data gathering and visioning a desired future estuary.
$30,000.00
2012

David Suzuki Foundation

Protecting the Peace: Enhancing Local Voices in the Greater Peace Break Region

The Peace Break Region supports agriculture and diverse wildlife, including threatened populations of bull trout, grizzly, fisher, and woodland caribou. The region has been severely degraded by logging, mining, oil and gas development and earlier large-scale hydro development. The region's lowlands are dominated by seismic lines, fracking operations, roads, pipeline crossings and other industrial infrastructure that seriously threaten the region's critical ecosystem services that regulate climate, disease outbreaks, and wastes, and that provide aesthetic, recreational and spiritual value. Unfortunately, the true worth of the region's natural capital is often poorly understood by policy-makers. For this reason the DSF and its partner West Moberly FN are proposing to complete a full natural capital valuation that will inventory and enumerate, in dollar terms, the non-market wealth of the region. This research will be accompanied by online mapping and other public engagement tools that will communicate the importance of natural capital to sustaining communities in the north.
$80,000.00
2012

Earthwise Society

Feed the Bees Planting Program

The Feed the Bees Planting Program addresses root causes of pollinator decline by engaging widespread community action to plant "bee friendly" gardens at homes, schools, businesses and boulevards. The gardens will be mapped on-line to show how individual plantings collectively start to create habitat corridors, reducing habitat fragmentation and assisting in the movement of pollinator populations within urban areas. The Earthwise Garden is a learning resource for the project, demonstrating how ecological plantings of diverse flowering species enhance biodiversity. These concepts will be applied on a community wide scale to replace natural vegetation lost through development. Supporting the widespread adoption of specific planting programs that provide flowers over a long season helps to meet the habitat needs of pollinators. By engaging residents living in urban areas to help address a problem that impacts farming, the project creates greater awareness of how we are all interconnected and how individual actions can impact regional biodiversity and ecological health.
$20,000.00
2012

Ecojustice Canada Society

Litigation and Law Reform Response to the Budget Implementation Act (Bill C-38)

With the passage of Bill C-38, Canada’s Budget Implementation Act, key environmental laws are being dismantled. A legal problem requires a legal solution, and, as the leading environmental law organization in Canada, Ecojustice will respond to these challenges. The courts are independent of government and play a vitally important role in our democracy, perhaps now more than ever. The courts must be the forum where we argue for the rights of our citizens to be heard and that our prosperity depends on environmental protection. A response to changes in law must be strategic, informed, and collaborative. Under the supervision of a new Law and Policy Lead, Ecojustice will identify, develop and implement test case litigation to challenge the legality of new provisions or regulations to enable Bill C-38. We will play a leadership role within BC’s environmental community by building strategic partnerships and roles, and recruiting and educating new and diverse clients and allies to lay the groundwork for a long-term plan to restore federal environmental laws.
$40,000.00
2012

Friends Of The Summerland Research Station Gardens

Best Practices for Sustainable Water Conservation Landscaping in the Okanagan

The Summerland Ornamental Gardens are located on a 6 hectare site of national horticultural significance with extensive botanical collections of native & introduced ornamental plants set within a unique dry ecosystem. The Project will introduce & demonstrate leading edge water conservation practices & technologies and will mobilize the community by creating a water stewardship team to raise awareness of sustainable water conservation landscaping. This Project will have two main parts: • introduction & demonstration of ecological science based practices & technologies in the planning, design & management of xeric or dry landscapes • education about these practices for the general public as well as public and private sector targeted groups, together with measurement of the impacts of adoption of such practices The Friends are uniquely positioned with partners in local and regional government, educational institutions and the media, and expert advisors in water management and ecological science to lead water conservation landscaping using this major horticultural resource.
$10,000.00
2012

Georgia Strait Alliance

Amplifying Community Voices - Stop Expansion of Tanker Traffic in Georgia Strait

The Georgia Strait region is faced with a serious threat from Kinder Morgan's proposal to build a second pipeline along the TransMountain route to carry diluted bitumen from the Alberta tar sands to the Lower Mainland and the corresponding increase in tanker traffic transporting it to refineries in Asia and the US. The public, local governments, other conservation groups and our own members have expressed their concern over the proposed expansion and the accompanying increased risk of an oil spill. GSA is taking a leadership role in helping to coordinate the efforts of organizations working to stop the pipeline expansion and ensuring the public is informed about Kinder Morgan's plans, the associated risks, and what individual citizens can do to raise their concerns through the complicated consultation processes. GSA will also build on our existing relationships to serve as a link between governments, the shipping industry and environmentalists and ensure that the real costs of an increase in tanker traffic and decisive action to reduce the risks are considered.
$20,000.00
2012

GOERT

Bring Back the Bluebird Reintroduction Project: a symbol of environmental hope

We are working toward returning the Western Bluebird to the Georgia Basin area of BC. We have partnered with the Province of BC, the Nature Conservancy of Canada, Salt Spring Island Conservancy, Ecostudies Institute, North American Bluebird Society, Victoria Natural History Society, and the American Bird Conservancy to undertake a 5 year reintroduction program. In this 2012-2013 project, we will translocate 5-10 pairs of adult Western Bluebirds from healthy source populations in Washington and release them on Vancouver Island or an adjacent Gulf Island. Community members are vital to the project's success, through participating directly or stewarding habitat. We will provide public education about the birds, as well as the ecosystems they depend upon. Project evaluation will assess the number and health of birds, as well as community engagement and conservation actions. Bringing this beautiful bird back to southwestern British Columbia is a powerful symbol of environmental hope: showing that it is possible to re-establish a part of our natural world that has disappeared.
$25,000.00
2012

Lower Similkameen

The LSIB Riparian Stewardship Workshops

Six hands-on workshops take members of LSIB onto the land for riparian restoration. The project originated from the desire to combine much-needed restoration work with education to increase community capacity. Need is two-fold: (1) As stewards of the largest intact riparian matrix in the South Okanagan, we need to build internal capacity to fulfill our traditional role of caring for the land. (2) A significant stretch along the Similkameen River has been badly damaged by erosion and is caught in an escalating cycle that reduces water quality and destroys increasingly rare habitat upon which many species at risk depend. Members of LSIB have a strong commitment to land stewardship. Our active TEK committee includes young people as well as Elders. Workshops will also be open to local conservation organizations. Workshops will bring together ecological experts and traditional knowledge keepers to assist community members to assess the target area, develop a stabilization plan, remove invasive species, and undertake indigenous planting to restore habitat and improve bank stability.
$15,000.00
2012

Nature Conservancy of Canada

Community Engagement in Species at Risk Recovery

NCC is actively engaged in protecting and stewarding habitat for species at risk in British Columbia with the objective of avoiding further extinctions. In some cases, we have an opportunity to reintroduce species to areas where they formerly occurred but have become locally extirpated. Doing so dramatically enhances the chances that these species will recover to self-sustaining, viable populations over the long term. If reintroductions can be accomplished with active participation from local communities including school-aged children and families a broader base of support for habitat protection and stewardship within local communities where species at risk occur can develop. NCC is a national leader in species at risk re-introductions. Through NCC’s Conservation Volunteer program, we will host at least five events on at least three of our conservation areas in the Salish Sea region. These events will engage local communities in our efforts to reintroduce species at risk.
$15,000.00
2012

Outdoor Recreation Council of B.C.

Healthy Forests-Healthy Communities

The 'Healthy forests-Healthy communities' is a non-partisan volunteer led and delivered initiative designed to catalyze discussion, dialogue and debate regarding BC forest lands management. Based on the 20 HFHC Community Dialogue Sessions held in 2011, forest dependent communities are concerned over the future of their forests and their sustainable contributions to the local economy. A 2012 activities plan has been designed to build on these results to provide more detailed recommendations and community actions. The input will be acquired from communities and concerned citizens through: 12 1-day workshops to obtain views from experts and senior implementation people; 15 1-day community workshops as a basis for community dialogue regarding community recommendations on the specific changes; reports based on the dialogue from all the workshops and summarized into a final report; 30 communications sessions informing communities of the 2011 - 2012 dialogue results and recommendations submitted to decision-makers, decision-maker influencers, communities and concerned citizens.
$20,000.00
2012

Pacific Parklands Foundation

Restoration of Guichon Creek - Bioswale Building & Bank Restoration

Guichon Creek, situated on the BCIT campus, has been undergoing restoration work by the BCIT Fish, Wildlife, and Recreation program and the Rivers Institute. Catching the Spirit youth will work with these organizations on the restoration efforts, in particular, work on the interception of sediment and urban runoff pollution that is currently affecting the health of the creek; home to both cutthroat trout and coho salmon. This hands-on project is an opportunity for youth to help restore the creek and its habitat. The project includes the building of a bioswale, a native vegetated drainage ditch that catches and filters sediment and pollutants from urban runoff, providing cleaner less polluted water for the creek. The banks of the creek will be restored through removal of invasive species and planting of native species to improve the creeks biodiversity. Fence building along the creek's riparian area will help delineate the sensitive area of the creek. CtS Youth will learn planning, leadership and restoration techniques important for the stewardship of fish and wildlife habitat.
$2,500.00
2012

QQS (EYES) Projects Society

Building capacity for salmon stewardship - traditional fish weir in the Koeye

The weir project aims to build capacity, and increase engagement in resource stewardship in the Heiltsuk community of Bella Bella by resurrecting the traditional practice of building fish weirs on the Koeye River. Fish weirs were used for thousands of years by First Nations as a means of selectively harvesting salmon in large rivers; however the practice has been dormant in Central Coast communities for more than 100 years. The project stems from Qqs’ core mission of engaging youth in Heiltsuk culture and their environment, and builds upon existing youth and environment programs at Koeye, creating a unique opportunity to involve young people in a project that provides critical data for the conservation of Heiltsuk resources. The Koeye is among the most important salmon producing streams in Heiltsuk territory. Enumeration of salmon using the traditional fish weir, would greatly enhance our understanding of salmon within Koeye, and would have broad relevance for understanding salmon populations throughout the region.
$30,000.00
2012

Raincoast Conservation Foundation

Oil Free Coast: Protecting The Salish Sea

Raincoast’s Oil Free Coast initiative focuses on the threats to BC’s marine and coastal environment posed from its potential conversion to an oil tanker energy corridor. Enbridge’s Northern Gateway project and Kinder Morgan’s Trans Mountain pipeline expansion are both proposing to ship Alberta’s tar sands oil through the coastal waters of BC. These proposals raise serious concerns at global, regional and local scales. They introduce the threat of chronic and potentially catastrophic oil spills in regions that host rare, endangered, vulnerable, and ecologically valuable species and ecosystems. Further, these routes provide outlets for the export of tar sands oil, exacerbating their staggering local impact and accelerating Canada’s contribution to atmospheric carbon. Raincoast is addressing this issue through several strategies tailored to the different proponents, processes and circumstances of the north and south coasts.
$20,000.00
2012

Ruby Lake Lagoon Nature Reserve Society Lagoon Society

Implementation of Sunshine Coast Biodiversity Strategy

In 2012, we launched a project to develop a Regional Biodiversity Strategy for the Sunshine Coast. Key achievements thus far include: (i) undertaking a biodiversity assessment to identify all existing data on local biodiversity; (ii) holding a 3-day long Biodiversity Summit attended by over 100 experts and stakeholders; (iii) drafting a Biodiversity Strategy, identifying common goals, objectives, and strategies to conserve biodiversity; and (iv) carrying out diverse public engagement activities reaching thousands of community members. We are requesting your continued support to build on the positive momentum, and move the Strategy from the development stage to the implementation stage. During this stage we will: (i) form Implementation Teams; (ii) create a detailed Action Plan with specific activities, timelines, targets, and lead organizations; (iii) develop a monitoring program; (iv) Publicly launch the Strategy; (v) initiate 6 pilot projects; (vi) undertake biodiversity surveys & mapping; (vii) create a Biodiversity Database, and (viii) continue public engagement activities.
$25,000.00
2012

Salal Foundation

Building a Freshwater Constituency in B.C.

Dogwood Initiative proposes a twelve month intensive base-building project for North Vancouver Island and the Lower Mainland that will develop a large, mobilized constituency deeply concerned with freshwater, protecting fish habitat and strong fisheries protection. The opposition to tankers on the B.C. coast that is evident in polling results is tied closely to concern for aquatic habitat and species. Commercial and sport fisheries are major economic forces that contribute to the economic sustainability of this region and recently proposed changes to federal fisheries regulations pose a serious threat to the resilience of these communities. Fish and fisheries are an important a part of the local identity which transcends differences and has the potential to unite public opinion in such a way as to compel protection of the resource. This provides a values-based approach to generating awareness of and opposition to pipeline development that threaten the ecological integrity of the coast.
$20,000.00
2012

T. Buck Suzuki Environmental Foundation

Working Together to Clean up the Estuaries of Northern Vancouver Island

In order to reduce biodiversity loss, protect the health of plants and creatures and improve the habitat in the estuaries of northern Vancouver Island, Living Oceans Society (LOS) will develop and coordinate a project with regional government and local organizations to safely remove and dispose of debris and other sources of pollution from populated near shore areas where high concentrations occur (docks, crabbing grounds, anchorages). The dangers to the marine environment and human safety from this threat are a concern to local residents and groups however no effort has yet been made to harness this interest and coordinate action to address the problem. This project will be the catalyst that inspires that community action. We will coordinate our project with Cetus Research and Conservation Society to ensure that this project will be an initial step to a derelict fishing gear removal project that can be duplicated for the entire coast of Vancouver Island and in other B.C. coastal communities.
$14,400.00
2012

Taku River Tlingit

Native Terrain Digital Collections Management System (DCMS)

This project results from the precedent setting agreement between the B.C. and TRTFN Governments to establish 13 new protected areas in our territory. That agreement relies heavily on co-management through the use/application of traditional ecological knowledge (TEK). Our TEK database includes an estimated 200,000 pages of information directly related to the new protected areas, including species-specific behaviors and distributional data, land use patterns and impacts, and information related to climate change and cultural resource management. Currently, we cannot effectively access this database. The purpose of this project is to complete development of and implement a digital collections management system (DCSM) that includes a TEK search engine platform tailor-made to our land management needs. We have spent two years developing a prototype of this software platform that we call “Native Terrain.” Project activities include: complete development of Native Terrain DCMS, input/code our entire TEK database, and integration of the program into the TRTFN government server.
$17,400.00
2012

The Sustainability Institute of Canada

Environment and Diversity Forum Series

Ethno-cultural communities across Canada have shown a strong desire to participate in environmental programming, that they have a concern about the environment and quality of life, and that Environmental NGOs (ENGOs) historically just have not worked with them. ENGOs have now come to realize that they have as much to learn from different ethno-cultural communities as these groups have from them, and that they become stronger and more relevant to the communities they work with when there is sincere collaboration. We are holding a series of one-day environment and diversity forums in Vancouver, Calgary, Winnipeg and Toronto to: 1. Share knowledge, experiences and best practices in engaging and developing collaborative relationships with ethno-cultural communities; 2. Discuss ways how ENGOs are promoting diversity within their organizations; 3. Compare and contrast environment and diversity initiatives in various cities; 4. Share these findings with other Canadian ENGOs and the general public; and, 5. Inspire ENGOs to develop their own environment and diversity initiatives.
$5,000.00
2012

Tides Canada Initiatives Society

Strengthening Leadership for Freshwater Protection

We propose to launch a water leaders program to facilitate the implementation of a robust outreach and communications plan around opportunities to protect and enhance British Columbia's freshwater ecosystems. The program will engage a minimum of 5 freshwater organizations throughout BC with the specific mandate to educate and engage the BC public in efforts to protect, enhance and restore the provinces freshwaters. A core element of the project is the development of a sophisticated outreach and communications plan that connects with the values of British Columbians. Designed with the help of public opinion research, the final product will inspire BC residents to become water champions. The overall goal of our efforts is to protect clean and sufficient freshwater in British Columbia to sustain a healthy economy and support vibrant ecosystems. As the Province of British Columbia seems poised to make changes to its century old Water Act, there is an important opportunity to create dialogue in the public on how best to prioritize and allocate water, while protecting healthy flows.
$20,000.00
2012

UBC - Faculty of Forestry

Visualizing Urban Futures with Community Energy

Public understanding and behaviour change on energy use is critical to reducing carbon footprints and building resilient communities. Since the idea of low-carbon community-wide energy systems is new in Canada, most people have little idea how typical neighbourhoods in Metro Vancouver can be retrofitted to be climate friendly. CALP proposes to engage communities, using compelling new visualisation tools to actively involve non-experts in learning about community energy. This proposal builds on an ongoing research study with Neptis Foundation and the GEOIDE Network Centre of Excellence, which is developing prototype visualization tools - "digital stories" about community energy, based on data in two pilot BC municipalities: Richmond and Surrey. This project will help build awareness and community capacity for climate change solutions. It will involve multiple stakeholders in developing a visual information toolkit for use in demonstrations, workshops, and web media to reach the "silent majority" who are often not engaged in social learning and community decision-making.
$30,000.00
2012

Wildsight Living Lakes Canada

Aquatic Habitat Index (AHI) and Archaeological Overview Assessment (AOA)

CCRIFC and its partners (also known as the Kootenay Lake Partnership) are in the process of developing a lake management plan that will be used throughout communities on Kootenay Lake as an over-arching directive on activities and development. As a component of a three-part lake study (the Foreshore Inventory and Mapping complete), the aquatic habitat index (AHI) and archaeological overview assessment (AOA) will feed into shoreline guidelines for the lake. This grant will support a two-fold study (AHI/AOA) that will be conducted simultaneously and integrated into a final guidance document. It will include a fish and wildlife inventory, detailed habitat assessments and an archaeological study to determine the natural and cultural values for each lake segment. The inventory will be used to develop an ecological health index of the shoreline and related upland area, which will indicate zones of sensitivity (e.g. wetlands, tributary outlets, native grasslands, wildlife habitat and corridors, biologically productive areas, and traditional and contemporary culturally significant sites)
$23,000.00
2012