Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

Allan Brooks Nature Centre Society

Improving Okanagan Habitat Connectivity "Going from here to there"

Improving Okanagan Habitat Connectivity 'How do we get from here to there' is an educational outreach initiative that will provide the tools to understand and take action on the results and recommendations from the Biodiversity Conservation Strategy project and also to help the general public to understand why connected ecosystems and wildlife habitat corridors are an essential part of maintaining biodiversity and ecosystem services in the Okanagan region. Both the SOSCP and the OCCP are working on a Biodiversity Conservation Strategy for the Okanagan region. The strategy promotes a “big-picture” landscape view of the region and provides a framework for considering conservation options for entire ecosystems and watersheds that go beyond municipal or rural boundaries and includes all land-tenures. The project that we are presenting here forms part of the implementation of the Biodiversity Conservation Strategy.
$20,000.00
2014

Carcross/Tagish First Nation

Sensitive Ecosystem Mapping & Holistic Land Use Planning

Carcross/Tagish First Nation (CTFN) is a Tlingit self-governing First Nation that began the process of Holistic Land Planning in 2012. An Environmental Scan began in December of 2012 with the goal of synthesizing all current, historical and relevant data. Nearing completion, the final steps include; sensitive ecosystem mapping, community engagement, implementation planning and finalization of the land use plan. Work will be conducted exclusively in the BC portion of the Traditional Territory (TT) addressing the habitat needs of identified species at risk through the development of a land use plan for the conservation and preservation of these valuable areas. The benefits of this project will extend beyond the Southern Lakes area; facilitating proactive ecosystem based planning and management, meeting the priorities of the Carcross/Tagish First Nation, the priorities and recommendations of the Southern Lakes Wildlife Coordinating Committee, planning and research priorities of Species at Risk Management Plans and will assist in the conservation and protection of critical habitat.
$50,000.00
2014

Centre for Indigenous Environmental Resources

Ts’elxwéyeqw Tribe Watershed Planning Readiness Assessment

The Chilliwack River Watershed is home to the Ts’elxweyeqw Tribe (TT), who are Stó:lō: 'People of the River”. They have stewarded this area since time immemorial; this intimate connection is reflected in its name: ‘Chilliwack’ is the anglicised version of Ts’elxweyeqw. In partnership with CIER and The WaterWealth Project, the TT are seeking funds for a Watershed Planning Readiness Assessment, which is the critical first phase of an indigenous-led Watershed Plan. The Readiness Assessment will confirm community interest in watershed planning, identify key gaps and needs in community capacity, and build essential knowledge and understanding of the planning process. The results of the first phase are required to move forward with the second phase of developing a Watershed Plan as it will identify an appropriate process and determine scope. A Ts’elxweyeqw Watershed Plan could involve indigenous and non-indigenous partners and will be driven by/interwoven with indigenous values, approaches and knowledge.
$30,000.00
2014

Ecojustice Canada Society

A Tale of Two Pipelines: Securing Legal Protections for British Columbia

Ecojustice represented Raincoast Conservation Foundation, Living Oceans Society and ForestEthics Advocacy at National Energy Board (NEB) hearings for Enbridge’s Northern Gateway pipelines. We submitted expert evidence on environmental threats and argued the project was not in the public interest. In July, the federal government approved the project, and we have now brought three legal actions: one alleging the review panel’s recommendation was based on a flawed environmental assessment and two challenging government approval and NEB certificates to authorize the project. Ecojustice is also representing Raincoast Conservation Foundation and Living Oceans Society in the regulatory review of the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion. We will focus on environmental risks while raising awareness of barriers to a transparent and participatory process. As a result of 2012 amendments to the National Energy Board Act, the review is compressed and will not include cross examinations or community hearings. We have been preparing for Kinder Morgan’s formal project application since 2011.
$60,000.00
2014

Fraser Valley Watersheds Coalition

RESTORING WATERWAYS THROUGH HANDS ON ACTIONS, OUTREACH AND EDUCATION

Our proposed project will improve both Luckacuck Creek, Stewart Creek, and off-channel habitats in the Chilliwack River watershed through enhancing and restoring riparian and aquatic habitats along these watercourses. Coupled with these “shovels-in-the-ground” tree plantings and restoration activities, we will work with the landowners and the community to raise awareness and appreciation for the importance of watershed health. This will include community participation at planting events, and the promotion for the importance of stewarding local waterways. We will provide opportunities for community members to be involved in collecting, analyzing and understanding data on stream health. It is paramount to foster a sense of place, and care for waterways, wildlife and habitat especially during changing land-uses and increasing populations.
$20,000.00
2014

Friends of Cortes Island

Cortes Island Stream Stewardship Program (CISSP)

This project addresses a community identified need to develop a formalized Stream Stewardship initiative on Cortes Island. Local volunteers have requested more advanced training to increase their knowledge and confidence in field skills, monitoring, data collection and management. In order to build local capacity, we would like to provide this training to our committed base of volunteers and to a new body of volunteers who have expressed interest. Through formal training, volunteers will have increased ability to monitor watershed quality over time. This data will be shared in meaningful ways with local and regional organizations in order to promote the preservation and rehabilitation of stream habitats. This project will engage a wide-range of community involvement in the assessment of existing salmon habitat, and will prompt greater awareness of how to observe, record, and report any important changes over time. This project will also establish a central repository for historical and future data in order to preserve these records and make this research available to the public.
$6,000.00
2014

Georgia Strait Alliance

Building Local Oil Spill Resilience

This project is central to GSA’s Energy & Shipping program’s strategic objective of improving oil spill prevention and response, an urgent issue given the projected sixfold increase in tanker traffic through Georgia Strait should the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain pipeline expansion proposal gain approval. GSA will: • Raise awareness of the impacts of an oil spill on a community • Advocate for improved local government spill prevention and response (to address the existing risk of diluted bitumen transport); • Use the absence of adequate local response capacity and plans as a strategy to raise local government concern about diluted bitumen transport (to advocate against increased transport via Kinder Morgan’s proposed expansion. The 2014 municipal elections provide an opportunity to work in a non-partisan way in a few communities with the most influencing potential, ultimately converting heightened concern about the increasing threat of an oil spill and lack of municipalities’ ability to respond into action by newly elected officials to improve spill planning and response capacity.
$22,100.00
2014

Home Is Where We Live Lifecycles Project Society

The Urban Seed Library will create a sustainable and transferable program model capable of institutionalizing seed collections and seed saving and biodiversity programming in BC's urban public libraries. Working with the Surrey Libraries, the Greater Victoria Public Library, and Richmond Food Security, we will collaboratively create an effective program model that will enable community members to establish viable seed collections in their local library. This project will create management systems and community resources that aim to make seeds and seed saving education freely accessible and publically shared. This will strengthen local food security, community health and biodiversity.
$25,000.00
2014

KATZIE CULTURAL EDUCATION SOCIETY

Eco-Cultural Restoration in Katzie Traditional Territory

The Katzie First Nation have participated at multiple levels of involvement in the restoration efforts of several organizations over the past decade. The KCES recognizes that restoration success in the traditional territory can be improved with clear goals and a bioregional scale of planning based on the principles of ecosystem and adaptive management. Of particular importance is the inclusion of traditional knowledge and values. The KCES propose to address these gaps by combining both scientific and traditional knowledge and values in a restoration plan for the Katzie traditional territory. To meet this goal, an Eco-Cultural Restoration Plan will be developed and shared with community participants that will be based on a wide spectrum of values distilled from community engagement workshops. This Plan will be bioregional in scope, but will contain site-specific guidelines that will identify key issues and solutions derived from traditional and scientific knowledge. Based on the Plan guidelines, three model sites will receive restoration efforts and will be monitored for success.
$38,000.00
2014

Kingfisher Environmental Interpretive Centre Society

Debris Flood Restoration

The Kingfisher Interpretive Centre incurred heavy damage by a catastrophic debris flood that roared down Cooke Creek on May 2nd, 2014. The damage to the site and our salmon hatchery is devastating but not insurmountable. We are working hard at re-establishing our ability to raise salmon and educate today's youth. We have major repairs to undertake including building an appropriate protective structure (berm in Cooke Creek), certified by an engineer, in order to regain our regular occupancy. We would like to have the new berm built and the majority of repairs (including re-establishing our compromised water sources) completed before the next Spring freshet (May) so that we will be allowed to use the site for raising our beloved salmon and educating local school children. We would also like to rebuild our internationally acclaimed watershed model that was completely destroyed by the flood and replace our lost inventory. We would like to request assistance from the Vancouver Foundation to aid us in our recovery and help us rebuild and recover our lost materials.
$15,000.00
2014

Kitasoo Kitasoo Band Council

Community Energy

Our program supports member Coastal First Nations communities in achieving their clean energy goals. We do this by hosing a supportive 'community of practice' where local leaders learn from each other, have access to external resources on an as-needed basis, and record progress towards their implementation goals on an annual basis. This program is in its third year, and is working towards achieving the objectives of the Great Bear Clean Energy Action Plan (2011) and the updated Clean Energy Strategy (2014). This work is important as it supports a strong peer-to-peer program that helps local leaders be stewards of their environment while supporting their local economies, moving communities off diesel generators, and fostering community pride. The next two years of work will focus on engaging community memebres and famililes in each community on how to better use energy in their homes, saving money, reducing diesel generation, reducing local pollution, and improving personal and ecosystem health.
$20,000.00
2014

Groundfish research by Central Coast Nations to implement marine protected areas

Our marine use plan identifies rockfish and lingcod as cultural and economic resources that have been overfished. Further, scientists warn that declines of large predators, such as lingcod and yelloweye rockfish, may disrupt entire ecological communities. Our marine use plan also is the backbone for the MaPP initiative (mappocean.org), an ongoing partnership between the Province of BC and First Nations which is zoning allowable uses, designing a candidate network of marine protected areas (MPA) and selecting indicator species for ecosystem health. MPA implementation, however, will require further collaboration with the federal government. Crucial to that implementation, our project uses science and traditional knowledge to document the past and current status of rockfish and lingcod populations. The resulting data will support final site selection for the MPA network and provide baselines for restoration and conservation goals, thereby ensuring that federal decisions on spatial protection address First Nation concerns. Given the current momentum of MaPP, our project is very timely.
$35,000.00
2014

Kwantlen Polytechnic University Foundation

Environmental Assessment of Southwest BC's Bio-regional Food System Future

The proposed is part of the SW British Columbia Bio-regional Food System Design and Plan study. We intend to elucidate environmental impacts/stewardship potentials of future food system choices, incorporating critical environmental stewardship/enhancement elements into a design that maximizes food self-reliance. We have identified a suite of environmental indicators for quantification, modeling, & monitoring of impacts of food production on soil, air & water quality, climate change, biodiversity & ecological footprint, to quantify the current status of food production in SWBC. We will model how outcomes may change given population growth, climate change impact and agricultural land diminution & explore options for increasing regional food production while protecting water resources & habitat, reducing greenhouse gas emissions, & lowering our food ecological footprint. We will then work with stakeholders to ID & develop strategies for minimizing tradeoffs to design a system to achieve multiple objectives of environmental stewardship, increasing food self-reliance, a robust economy.
$25,000.00
2014

Nature Trust of British Columbia

Kootenay Conservation Program - Stewardship

In 2013 the Kootenay Conservation Program (KCP) worked with both its West Kootenay and East Kootenay Stewardship Committees to develop a Stewardship Framework to guide stewardship activities across the region. This framework identifies the need to increase the region's resiliency to the impacts of climate change, contribute to maintaining and/or restoring viable populations of species of interest and reducing the abundance and distribution of existing priority invasive species as well as prevent establishment of new invasive species. In order to effectively accomplish this, the KCP is proposing the further development of stewardship tracking and reporting tools, as well as the development of a relationship map to enhance stewardship activities. We are also proposing building capacity and enhancing collaboration within our partnership through the coordination of a series of conservation webinars and workshops.
$15,000.00
2014

Nuxalk Nation

Nuxalk Sputc Protection: a community-based eulachon conservation project

This innovative project will advance conservation policy and practice through the creation of a community-based Sputc (eulachon) Protection Plan. Bringing together Nuxalkmc (Nuxalk people) and resource managers, the plan will integrate traditional knowledge and science through community events, archival research, and interviews, upholding traditional ways of knowing while enhancing engagement in eulachon protection. Many recognize the value of including First Nations knowledge in decision-making, but the means by which to do so are largely undeveloped. This grassroots project –the first of its kind- will serve as an example of traditional knowledge integration in practice. Broad interest in the project has been expressed by other Nations and partners, who hope to use it as a template for future engagement. Accordingly, a strategic regional workshop will be held to share lessons learned. This project is one pillar of a cultural revitalisation initiative currently underway in Nuxalk territory, which includes the revival of an annual eulachon welcoming ceremony, a film, and research.
$30,000.00
2014

Pembina Foundation for Environmental Research and Education

Communities, Water & Carbon: Mitigating shale gas impacts in northeast BC

Shale gas development in northeast BC will significantly increase with the emergence of an export-oriented LNG industry. At the same time, the current regulatory framework is insufficient to protect communities from the negative impacts of hydraulic fracturing (fracking). Initial conversations with First Nations and community leaders in the northeast indicate that impacted communities would welcome information to enhance understanding of technologies, policies and best practices that could reduce the impact on water (quality and quantity – which are serious local concerns) and climate (GHG emissions). We propose to undertake research and engagement to reduce upstream shale gas development impacts in northeast BC: to provide accessible research findings and communications tools to First Nations and communities; to undertake coordinated outreach to strengthen networks across the north and to increase public awareness across the province; and to promote policies and practices with the provincial government and industry in collaboration with leaders in northeast BC.
$60,000.00
2014

Salal Foundation

Beyond Coal

Vancouver has pledged to be the Greenest City on Earth by 2020 (http://vancouver.ca/greenestcity)and has adopted an ambitious conservation agenda that enjoys broad support amongst its residents. British Columbia can be duly proud that it derives none of its electricity from coal-fired generation. However, the Port of Vancouver has become the largest exporter of coal on the continent and exports are expanding rapidly. In the United States concern about Climate Change and opposition to coal generation has successfully reduced the domestic market for thermal coal. This huge surplus of US thermal coal is now making its way to Asian markets through Vancouver, making our region complicit in the dirtiest industry on earth. In the past year the Beyond Coal campaign has attracted the support of 24,000 residents of the lower mainland and 13 area municipalities have adopted resolutions opposed to the expansion of coal ports. With the support of Vancouver Foundation we can prevent the expansion of thermal coal exports and gain greater local control over Port Metro Vancouver.
$25,000.00
2014

Sierra Club of British Columbia Foundation

Building Community Capacity for Conservation Outcomes

With the support of the Vancouver Foundation, Sierra Club BC (“SCBC”) will work with our local group in Powell River (“Sierra Malaspina”) and Myrtle Creek Stewards to enhance ecological values in Myrtle Creek and build capacity within these groups in order to create a sense of community ownership and investment in the local environment. Following project completion in Powell River, Sierra Club BC will deliver the training to groups in Nanaimo, Quadra Island, Vancouver and the Okanagan. We envisage four interacting components: (1) fish habitat restoration, (2) building grassroots leadership capacity to maximise the effect of (3) community and stakeholder engagement. Component (4) would include training other local groups and supporting peer-to-peer learning, enabling them to replicate similar projects in their communities. Sierra Club BC is well positioned to offer these trainings due to years of experience doing public engagement and education. The youth engagement training module will draw on expertise from Sierra Club BC’s ongoing Youth Environmental Leadership Program.
$15,000.00
2014

Tides Canada Foundation

Increasing the Impact of Freshwater Funding in British Columbia

The goal is to go beyond networking, to achieve focused learning, partnership development and action on specific initiatives by establishing a program with structure, professional support and coordination, and tangible deliverables Over the next year, funders of freshwater working in British Columbia will formalize and strengthen their emerging collaborative effort known as the BC Water Funders Group. The purpose of this collaborative is to find areas of common interest and alignment between funders that facilitate the strategic use of collective resources to advance freshwater protection in B.C. The goal is to both increase the resources available for freshwater protection efforts and ensure funders are more effectively coordinating the use of those funds to ensure they are having a collective impact. The group provides a forum for exchange of information and peer learning between funders and water leaders by strengthening relationships, knowledge and networks. Over the next year, the funders group will host two-in person meetings and one field trip. It will convene three to four
$10,000.00
2014

Tides Canada Initiatives Society

Hartley Bay Great Bear LIVE

The Gitga’at First Nation, located in Hartley Bay on the north coast of B.C., have developed land and marine use plans for their territory that include as key principles: protecting ecosystem integrity, ensuring their unique and rich culture is preserved and enhancing their capacity to engage in research and resource management. Gitga’at entities have requested that PWI collaboratively develop and deploy a Great Bear LIVE remote camera project in Gitga’at territory. Great Bear LIVE is a technologically advanced remote monitoring system developed by PWI to monitor terrestrial and marine wildlife through video and audio which can be streamed live online for broader public engagement and education. This project will meet 2 key community-identified objectives: 1. To employ non-invasive research and broad-based public education tools to further environmental protection, understanding and long term monitoring of Gitga’at traditional territory. 2. To engage and prepare youth as future stewards of Gitga’at territory by providing training in technology,wildlife monitoring and stewardship.
$60,000.00
2014

University of Victoria

The Ocean Soundscape

June 16, 2014, the Vancouver Aquarium and ONC co-hosted a workshop for BC hydrophone experts/owners to discuss how best to coordinate, manage, interpret, and monitor the soundscape of our ocean. This coalition devised a cohesive vision to create a combined digital coastal network that would foster a safe and sustainable marine environment through the creation of four working groups (Research, Technical Development, Data & Products, and Policy). It is imperative to understand the impact on marine life of the volume and frequency of human-made sound in the sea, which is rapidly increasing. This coalition is comprised of scientists, industry and coastal communities working together to quantify how the ocean soundscape is changing and developing solutions to influence policies. ONC seeks funding for a 1-year Ocean Soundscape Coordinator to facilitate the four working groups and deliver their results based on sound scientific principles and document them in a report. The report will form the basis of a larger combined funding proposal targeting other entities to deliver their results.
$25,000.00
2014

West Coast Environmental Law Research Foundation

Protecting the Communities and Ecosystems of the Salish Sea

Zoom online meeting software Meeting the challenge of climate change impacts like sea level rise has created an opportunity to deepen regional collaboration and improve environmental management and protection in the Salish Sea. A scientific report commissioned by West Coast in 2014 from the Fisheries Centre at UBC presents the “business case” to protect our coastal ecosystems, and documents case studies from other coastal areas around the world showing how coastal “green” infrastructure has effectively managed the impacts of extreme weather events. However, the effectiveness of green infrastructure measures is relatively limited if only implemented in a single municipality, and planning and implementation at a regional scale is necessary, which is what we will facilitate through this project. Our own legal research and analysis to date has helped identify examples of mechanisms and structures that would be effective in planning, co-managing, monitoring and enforcing environmental protection at a regional scale using an integrated approach, and there is willingness among key actors for regional collaboration.
$30,000.00
2014

Yellowstone to Yukon Conservation Initiative

Engaging Communities and First Nations in the Peace River Break

Y2Y seeks to protect wildlife habitat, preserve wildlife movement, and enlist community support so that wildlife populations in the Peace River Break (PRB) remain healthy and connected to those in Alberta’s mountain parks and northern B.C. Since 2008, Y2Y has worked with northern communities to develop a conservation vision for habitat protection and conservation throughout the PRB. Partners include First Nations, the District of Hudson’s Hope, environmental groups, and the University of Northern B.C. Together we have completed a conservation vision map and strategic plan. Y2Y recently hired a full-time Peace River Break Coordinator, based in Chetwynd, to expand and implement this conservation strategy, including advocating for new protected areas. We have secured 3-years of funding for this position, and are seeking support from Vancouver Foundation to help cover travel costs to First Nations’ and non-First Nations’ communities, venue rental, and the creation of a new multimedia presentation and communications materials to promote the conservation vision.
$10,000.00
2014

Young Naturalists' Club of BC

Engaging youth to protect amphibians through road surveys

Amphibians play a key role in wetland health. Yet amphibian populations are in decline- they are the most threatened vertebrate group on earth (The Global Amphibian Assessment, 2004) . In BC, roads pose a significant risk to amphibians as they annually migrate to and from sources of water for breeding. Training and empowering youth to conduct Amphibian Road Surveys will help conserve amphibians through the collection of data (identifying high amphibian-use road crossings as sites for management and mitigation efforts) and by raising awareness and engaging local youth and families in local amphibian conservation. Remote training, including online videos and webinars, will be used to enable Young Naturalists’ Clubs around BC to conduct amphibian road surveys. A Road Survey Kit containing all the materials needed to conduct their road survey will be provided to interested clubs for their use. Youth Citizen Scientists will enter their data online to the BC Frogwatch website where the data will be collated, mapped and archived, contributing to the conservation of amphibian populations.
$19,875.00
2014