Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

Ecojustice Canada Society

Species and Ecosystem Protection Act for BC, Years 2 and 3

To conduct research and policy analysis to provide technical support to the BC Species at Risk Working Group. Legal activities will also leverage media as part of a public outreach campaign to secure a Species and Ecosystem Protection Act in BC. Ecojustice’s interdisciplinary approach and leadership will demonstrate the need for additional legislative protection for BC species and habitat.
$50,000.00
2010

Ecotrust Canada

Green Building with Clayoquot Sound First Nations

Green Building with Clayoquot Sound First Nations
$10,000.00
2011

Green and Culturally Appropriate Building for Clayoquot First Nations

To design a green housing plan for First Nations communities in Clayoquot Sound which will use local materials and labour, be well-suited to the climate and affordable to build, maintain and heat. The project will produce designs incorporating green building options and culturally appropriate building elements for each community accompanied by a financial plan to enable them to actually be built.
$20,000.00
2010

Environmental Defence Canada

Freshwater and habitat protection through the Blue Flag program

In 2014, we are looking forward to celebrating BC's first ever Blue Flag beach in the community of Harrison Hot Springs. Having qualified as a Blue Flag candidate in August 2011, Harrison Hot Spring's town council voted to certify for the stringent 32 criteria under the international Blue Flag program. We would like to help them attain this prized eco-label, internationally awarded to the world's cleanest, safest beaches and marinas. We are also excited to celebrate BC's first ever Blue Flag beach, and inspire others to protect their aquatic ecosystems. As Harrison Hot Springs' candidacy has attracted local attention, we have since been approached by other BC municipalities about our program. Over the next 3 years, we will invite 15 municipalities to join our Blue Flag program, and walk them through the process by which they can protect their important freshwater resources, while celebrating their communities' environmental commitments. Some of these other freshwater bodies are Shuswap, Okanagan and Cultus Lakes, in addition to many other popular freshwater BC beaches.
$25,000.00
2013

Environmental Youth Alliance

Inner-Nature: Developing a Connected Schoolyard Greening Project

THE SOIL - We will work with at least 3 classes at each of: 2 secondary & 1 elementary schools in Vancouver to pilot innovative, experiential learning in schoolyard green spaces. Our aim will be to find ways to engage students and teachers in learning about urban wildlife and creating schoolyard gardens to house a diversity of wild creatures. These programs will combine wildlife and food garden creation with citizen science programming. Our goal in the development phase of this project is to learn with youth & educators how schools can create and USE biodiverse natural spaces on their grounds. THE SCHOOL INSTITUTION - We will meet quarterly with: youth, administrators at each school, coordinators of Community School Teams, the VSB Sustainability Department, Youth Workers in the SACY program, community partners, and local alternate schools to discuss approaches for creating regular, sustainable nature access for vulnerable students. Together we will draft a template Memorandum of Understanding that the EYA can use as a framework to guide our partnerships with VSB schools and Community Hubs in the future. OUR FRIENDS IN THE VSFN - We will continue to meet with these partners to update them on our work with the school institution, and will seek to include multiple organizations from the VSFN in our work. Together we will set common goals, learn how to effectively collaborate and develop a shared narrative that we can use to broadly communicate our work.
$10,000.00
2015

The Nectar Trail

Work by local ecologists has shown that corridors connecting habitat islands can lead to large population increases for local pollinators. To this end, we will work with the community to implement a demonstration habitat corridor that links existing pollinator-friendly parks. By supporting local residents to maintain 1000s of pollinator plants and structures along these routes, we will create habitat-rich sites in which bees, butterflies, and birds can thrive. Partnering with the City of Vancouver, Vancouver Park Board, residents, schools, and businesses, the Nectar Trail will link conservation, land use, health, and food, providing a forum for the people of Vancouver to examine urban ecological interdependencies. The project will be created along the newly established Ridgeway Greenway in the section between Vandusen Garden and Queen Elizabeth Park. Connecting the parks with several large pollinator gardens accompanied with onsite interpretive media and environmental art, our demonstration 'Nectar Trail' creates a new model of urban restoration and a unique amenity for Vancouver.
$20,000.00
2013

Evergreen

Uncover Still Creek

Through the “Uncover Still Creek” program, Evergreen will work with the City of Vancouver to rehabilitate priority municipal lands into spaces that welcome community members to spend time, provide vital habitat for terrestrial and aquatic species and mitigate high stormwater flows and poor water quality. The program aims to connect citizens with their watershed, encouraging them to take action both locally and as a community to ensure the health of Still Creek’s waters.
$15,000.00
2011

Fair Mining Collaborative

Transboundary watershed protection: building relationships, better laws and public awareness

Our work centers on creating strong, respectful relationships between BC First Nations, Alaska Tribes, and NGO’s on both sides of the border to collaboratively change antiquated ineffective mining laws and policy. Knowledge is power. FMC will provide our proven education program to the CTC, including; Fair Mining Practices: A New Mining Code for British Columbia (FMPC), Mine Medicine Manual (MMM), Fair Mining Training Program (FMTP), and the Northern Secwepemc Tribal Council (NSTC) Mining Policy. Many BC communities already use FMC’s products to increase their understanding of the mining regulatory system, and leverage change through shared decision-making and implementation of innovative best management practices that protect their interests. Very diverse users of FMC’s education program, (Amnesty International to the Tsilhqot’in National Government to Argentinian filmmaker Hernan Vilchez to mining industry organizations), have successfully changed conflicted relationships and made effective changes in regulatory systems. Forward thinking mining companies are recognizing First Nations as decision-making equals, knowing their projects must receive a social license from all affected communities, or the economic viability of their project will be jeopardized. Our work proves that sharing effective tools with the most affected groups, can change the status quo rapidly from the ground up, leaving legislators and recalcitrant industry to catch up.
$80,000.00
2016

Farm Folk / City Folk

The Smart Farm Project - Phase 2

The Smart Farm Project proposes adapting smart growth principles to small farm acreages outside the Agricultural Land Reserve in rural communities to catalyze new farms across BC. With a combination of low footprint design, progressive local planning, non-profit or public oversight, social investment and farming know-how, the Smart Farm Project leverages increased density to create affordable homes and farming opportunities, boost agriculture production and generate more jobs for the local economy at the same time. In 2013, a group of stakeholders completed Phase 1 of The Smart Farm Project-a detailed report analyzing four Smart Farm proposals on four different land holdings on the Sunshine Coast. Phase 2 of The Smart Farm Project will: 1) launch an outreach strategy to catalyze Smart Farm proposals in multiple regions across Southern BC, 2) develop the legal and financing frameworks to ensure these developments are community-owned and operated, and 3) coordinate a series of forums with local government, provincial authorities, legal professionals and farm proponents to draft a development application process that support implementation of small farm co-housing developments outside the ALR.
$25,000.00
2015

Don't Pocket the Potatoes: Addressing Community Garden Theft in Richmond

While Richmond Food Security Society officially manages the community garden program, we work closely with a wide range of stakeholders. While each stakeholder has shared ideas on how to address the issue of community garden theft, we have yet to form an official project team to address this thoroughly and would like to do so. What we would like to do is form a project team who will work together to research possible solutions. This will include a detailed scan of best practices in other communities, resulting in a detailed webpage where Richmond Community gardeners can learn from. We would also like to conduct a survey of gardeners, in at least 3 languages to find out their personal experience with theft and their ideas to address it. This will provide gardeners with a necessary outlet for their concerns. We would also like to compare the thefts from 2015 to physical site characteristics to determine which physical features may deter thefts. We have only been tracking garden theft data for one year, and would like to track it again in 2016 in order to get a better understanding of the scope of this problem. While we only have data for one year, we have anecdotal and media evidence (through articles in the Richmond review dating back to 2013) that this problem is ongoing.
$10,000.00
2015

Fraser River Discovery Centre Society

FRDC's Outdoor Interpretive Panels

IIn the 1990s, the Fraser River Discovery Centre (FRDC) created a series of 22 visually exciting and thoughtprovoking interpretive panels which were displayed along a 1.3km riverfront boardwalk. The panels heighten awareness of environmental issues related to the Fraser River watershed; stimulate river advocacy and interpretation; and encourage community participation by fostering a stronger understanding, ownership and desire to act positively to affect the river's health. This project would replace damaged panels in September 2012 with updated design and information to coincide with Artists on the River, the FRDC’s annual festival celebrating Rivers Day.
$10,000.00
2011

Fraser Riverkeeper Society

Stand Up for Pacific Salmon Animation

The project will create a visually compelling animation to educate the public about the problem of net-pen salmon fish farms and their impact on the aquatic environment, human health and wild salmon stocks. It will show consumers how to help shift global salmon farming to a more positive economic and ecological operation: closed-containment or tank system, aquaculture. The project is part of a larger campaign that educates consumers on the risks posed to wild salmon by net-pen farms, and facilitates citizen engagement with retailers.
$20,000.00
2010

Fraser Valley Watersheds Coalition

RESTORING WATERWAYS THROUGH HANDS ON ACTIONS, OUTREACH AND EDUCATION

Our proposed project will improve both Luckacuck Creek, Stewart Creek, and off-channel habitats in the Chilliwack River watershed through enhancing and restoring riparian and aquatic habitats along these watercourses. Coupled with these “shovels-in-the-ground” tree plantings and restoration activities, we will work with the landowners and the community to raise awareness and appreciation for the importance of watershed health. This will include community participation at planting events, and the promotion for the importance of stewarding local waterways. We will provide opportunities for community members to be involved in collecting, analyzing and understanding data on stream health. It is paramount to foster a sense of place, and care for waterways, wildlife and habitat especially during changing land-uses and increasing populations.
$20,000.00
2014

Restoring and Sustaining our Freshwater Resources

Restoring and Sustaining our Freshwater Resources: Creating a Culture for natural healthy communities. FVWC will work with landowners, governments, First Nations, other organizations and communities across the Fraser Valley. The focus is to create a culture around protecting and sustaining our freshwater resources. In order to do so, a number of projects benefiting the different facets of the region and diversity of people, coupled with existing and publicly accepted events, is required. In general, we plan to: -Help identify local and regional level threats to waterways and create a shared information database with a regional/watershed approach. -Monitor water quality/fish presence along key watercourses across the Fraser Valley that contain known salmon spawning, rearing and other rare species. Data will be used to help isolate areas of waterway threats and opportunities. -Host a Manure and Water workshop. -Conduct riparian habitat enhancements throughout the Fraser Valley. -Engage and share knowledge about protecting freshwater resources -Conduct habitat restoration
$30,000.00
2013

Friends of Cortes Island

Cortes Island Stream Stewardship Program (CISSP)

This project addresses a community identified need to develop a formalized Stream Stewardship initiative on Cortes Island. Local volunteers have requested more advanced training to increase their knowledge and confidence in field skills, monitoring, data collection and management. In order to build local capacity, we would like to provide this training to our committed base of volunteers and to a new body of volunteers who have expressed interest. Through formal training, volunteers will have increased ability to monitor watershed quality over time. This data will be shared in meaningful ways with local and regional organizations in order to promote the preservation and rehabilitation of stream habitats. This project will engage a wide-range of community involvement in the assessment of existing salmon habitat, and will prompt greater awareness of how to observe, record, and report any important changes over time. This project will also establish a central repository for historical and future data in order to preserve these records and make this research available to the public.
$6,000.00
2014

Friends Of The Summerland Research Station Gardens

Innovative Landscaping for Water Conservation

Building on the momentum and success of our pilot project, the Friends are requesting assistance with this new phase of our water conservation program as it relates to our community outreach, water conservation survey, demonstration sites and educational programs. The single action that will have the most significant impact on increasing water conservation in the Okanagan Basin is reducing discretionary water use for landscaping. The current Friends’ board and staff are committed to making water conservation a top priority. Our demonstration sites will incorporate innovative solutions to measure and reduce water use and enchance habitat and increase biodiversity. Our outreach will involve residents, community leaders, volunteers and students in applied science activities designed to inform their environmental stewardship. The project will act as an agent of change for sustainable water conservation landscaping and is intended to increase adoption of ecologically based landscaping practices in the region through demonstration, education and strengthening community partnerships.
$10,000.00
2013

Best Practices for Sustainable Water Conservation Landscaping in the Okanagan

The Summerland Ornamental Gardens are located on a 6 hectare site of national horticultural significance with extensive botanical collections of native & introduced ornamental plants set within a unique dry ecosystem. The Project will introduce & demonstrate leading edge water conservation practices & technologies and will mobilize the community by creating a water stewardship team to raise awareness of sustainable water conservation landscaping. This Project will have two main parts: • introduction & demonstration of ecological science based practices & technologies in the planning, design & management of xeric or dry landscapes • education about these practices for the general public as well as public and private sector targeted groups, together with measurement of the impacts of adoption of such practices The Friends are uniquely positioned with partners in local and regional government, educational institutions and the media, and expert advisors in water management and ecological science to lead water conservation landscaping using this major horticultural resource.
$10,000.00
2012

Galiano Conservancy Association

Living Landscapes: Restoring Place, Connecting People Project

The project will implement ecological restoration treatments and conduct restoration planning on Galiano Island with a strong educational and community engagement focus. The project will take place on DL 57, a parcel that was recently acquired by the Galiano Conservancy and is recognized regionally for its high conservation value. The 76 Ha. property supports a diversity of healthy, intact ecosystems and has a history of agriculture, small scale forestry and residential use. The vision for the property includes the creation of the Galiano Learning Centre to provide a venue for multi-day experiential education programs along with long-term research and innovation focused on restoration and sustainable living. The Conservancy has assembled a team of experienced partners and professionals, students and community volunteers to initiate the restoration of a portable mill site, helping to create a thriving forest ecosystem out of hard-packed earth. Our team will also develop a property level restoration plan that is crafted to provide long-term educational and research opportunities.
$20,000.00
2013

Georgia Strait Alliance

Building community strength and resilience to oil spills in vulnerable coastal areas

This project represents a social innovation that can be executed within a medium-term timeframe and contributes to an over-arching societal shift - away from a belief system that accepts as inevitable our dependence on fossil fuels and towards a system which acknowledges the inherent risks in this dependence and works toward a clean energy future. In a time of growing concerns about global climate change and with our increasing recognition of the local impacts of oil spills, this project works from the ground up to change how communities prepare for and invest in local oil spill response and stand together to voice their opposition to projects like Kinder Morgan’s pipeline expansion. Kinder Morgan’s proposal would greatly increase the risk of a spill that would devastate local communities and ecosystems and significantly contribute to climate change. By working with local governments and individuals to identify and address gaps in local oil spill preparedness and response, the project will address the imbalance of resources, power and knowledge that currently prevents local governments from adequately planning for oil spills. This will increase the ability of vulnerable communities, and the people who will be most directly affected by a spill, to have a voice in creating a strengthened spill response regime which will protect and restore their local natural habitats and ecosystems and foster community resilience.
$54,000.00
2015

Building Local Oil Spill Resilience

This project is central to GSA’s Energy & Shipping program’s strategic objective of improving oil spill prevention and response, an urgent issue given the projected sixfold increase in tanker traffic through Georgia Strait should the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain pipeline expansion proposal gain approval. GSA will: • Raise awareness of the impacts of an oil spill on a community • Advocate for improved local government spill prevention and response (to address the existing risk of diluted bitumen transport); • Use the absence of adequate local response capacity and plans as a strategy to raise local government concern about diluted bitumen transport (to advocate against increased transport via Kinder Morgan’s proposed expansion. The 2014 municipal elections provide an opportunity to work in a non-partisan way in a few communities with the most influencing potential, ultimately converting heightened concern about the increasing threat of an oil spill and lack of municipalities’ ability to respond into action by newly elected officials to improve spill planning and response capacity.
$22,100.00
2014

Amplifying Community Voices - Stop Expansion of Tanker Traffic in Georgia Strait

The Georgia Strait region is faced with a serious threat from Kinder Morgan's proposal to build a second pipeline along the TransMountain route to carry diluted bitumen from the Alberta tar sands to the Lower Mainland and the corresponding increase in tanker traffic transporting it to refineries in Asia and the US. The public, local governments, other conservation groups and our own members have expressed their concern over the proposed expansion and the accompanying increased risk of an oil spill. GSA is taking a leadership role in helping to coordinate the efforts of organizations working to stop the pipeline expansion and ensuring the public is informed about Kinder Morgan's plans, the associated risks, and what individual citizens can do to raise their concerns through the complicated consultation processes. GSA will also build on our existing relationships to serve as a link between governments, the shipping industry and environmentalists and ensure that the real costs of an increase in tanker traffic and decisive action to reduce the risks are considered.
$20,000.00
2012

Gitga'at First Nation

"We monitor by living here": The Gitga'at Environmental Knowledge Project

In a time of rapid social and environmental change, the Gitga’at First Nation seeks to draw on the local and traditional knowledge of its elders and harvesters to provide a more holistic understanding of the natural word. By documenting observations and knowledge of active harvesters during seasonal harvest rounds, the Gitga’at will create a Knowledge Bank that will be drawn upon to inform holistic resource stewardship and rapid climate change adaptation, while also bolstering intergenerational traditional knowledge transmission and empowering community members to continue their sacred relationship with their territory through active stewardship.
$10,000.00
2017

Global Youth Education Network Society

Next UP grow program

Next UP is our flagship program at genius. Next UP (NU) is an intensive seven-month leadership program for young people age 18-32 who are committed to working on social justice issues, environmental issues and climate change. Next UP began eight years ago in Vancouver and now operates programs in Vancouver, Calgary, Edmonton, Saskatoon, Winnipeg and Ottawa. We have 384 graduates across the country with about 120 of them in BC. After 8 years of delivering and refining the NU program we want to offer new formats and versions of the program to different constituencies over the next three years. Next UP grow will allow us to deepen the scope and impact of our work and grow our network of social change leaders. The full-length NU programs run from September through to the following May. Each fall people apply to get in to the various NU programs and at the end of each selection process 12-16 participants are invited to form a program cohort in each program city. The program is free of cost to all participants and funding dependent we can provide support for childcare and participant travel. The cohort meets 1 evening a week and 1 full Saturday a month over the course of the 7 months and participants do work to explore their own leadership styles, learn about solutions to topical issues, develop key leadership skills and receive training in an array of areas to provide them with an excellent tool kit to draw upon in their respective leadership journeys.
$77,000.00
2015

GOERT

Engaging Communities in Bluebird Stewardship

This project will build a framework for community involvement through participation, training, and outreach in the Western Bluebird Reintroduction Program. We are re-establishing this locally extinct population through a series of translocations over 5 years, and by installing nestboxes to replace this critical missing habitat element. The population’s long-term viability will largely depend on fostering community support and volunteer action, because most remaining Garry oak habitats are on private property. A highlight of this project is recruiting bluebird volunteers and providing them with formal training at ‘Bluebird Field School’, allowing them to participate in crucial activities: building & monitoring nestboxes; monitoring & reporting nestbox activity; surveying for birds; and improving habitat quality to support biodiversity conservation. This project will develop a comprehensive community outreach program for the final 2 years of translocations, to ensure continued habitat suitability and to serve as a model for other communities re-building populations of rare species.
$15,000.00
2013

Bring Back the Bluebird Reintroduction Project: a symbol of environmental hope

We are working toward returning the Western Bluebird to the Georgia Basin area of BC. We have partnered with the Province of BC, the Nature Conservancy of Canada, Salt Spring Island Conservancy, Ecostudies Institute, North American Bluebird Society, Victoria Natural History Society, and the American Bird Conservancy to undertake a 5 year reintroduction program. In this 2012-2013 project, we will translocate 5-10 pairs of adult Western Bluebirds from healthy source populations in Washington and release them on Vancouver Island or an adjacent Gulf Island. Community members are vital to the project's success, through participating directly or stewarding habitat. We will provide public education about the birds, as well as the ecosystems they depend upon. Project evaluation will assess the number and health of birds, as well as community engagement and conservation actions. Bringing this beautiful bird back to southwestern British Columbia is a powerful symbol of environmental hope: showing that it is possible to re-establish a part of our natural world that has disappeared.
$25,000.00
2012

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