Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

Grasslands Conservation Council of British Columbia

Private Land Protection - Exploring Options

The "Private Land Protection - Exploring Options" project seeks to explore an expanded role for the Grasslands Conservation Council of British Columbia (GCC) relating to the protection and conservation of priority grasslands across British Columbia. While grasslands represent only 1% of the provincial land base they provide habitat for over 30% of the province's species at risk. GCC would like to enhance its role around protection and conservation of critical habitats for species at risk on private land. We see a possible niche for using conservation covenants on agricultural lands that will enhance both biodiversity conservation and the economic vitality of agricultural producers.
$9,200.00
2017

Grizzly Bear Foundation

Strategies for Human-Grizzly Coexistence and Conflict Reduction in Rural BC (“COEXIST”)

Strategies for Human-Grizzly Coexistence and Conflict Reduction in Rural BC (“COEXIST”) will address the increase in human-grizzly conflict resulting in unsafe situations for both humans and bears. COEXIST will catalyze on-the-ground action by enhancing the knowledge and resources available to local governments, First Nations, the forestry industry, and the public to promote coexistence. COEXIST provides solutions to current wildlife management shortcomings, reducing conflict costs to bears and communities, and in turn creating local economic development opportunities.
$83,000.00
2017

Habitat Acquisition Trust

Fostering Wetland Stewardship: The Painted Turtle Conservation Circle

This project will enable four conservation organizations from different parts of southwest BC coast to join forces to protect the endangered western painted turtle, a flagship species for engaging communities in wetland conservation, and its associated habitat. The groups will share and standardize methods and stewardship materials, coordinate research, restore important habitats and create wetland management guidelines.
$30,000.00
2010

Haisla Nation

Nanakila Guardian Watchmen

Nanakila was incorporated as a non-profit society on June 28, 2011. Part of the mission to, 'Conserve and restore all resources in Haisla and surrounding territory' is achieved through our Guardian Watchman program. Nanakila is a Haisla word meaning 'to stand guard over', Nanakila watchmen patrol the region stretching from the Kitamaat Valley in the north to the Kitlope Valley in the south - a total area of 13000 square kilometers. Haisla Territory includes pristine watersheds - Kiltope, Kowesas and Gilttoyees as well as some of the most heavily altered watersheds in British Columbia. In 1994 The Kitlope Heritage Conservancy with Provincial Park status was created and through an agreement with Kitamaat Village Council and BC Parks, Nanakila created the Watchman Program to manage the Conservancy. The agreement with BC Parks now encompasses patrols within the Haisla Territory including: Kitimat River Park, Wedeene Park, Coste Rocks, Kildala, Gilttoyees, Jesse Falls, Eagle Bay, Crab river, Shearwater, Klekane, Bishop Bay, Brim river, Sue Channel, and Kitlope Heritage Conservancy
$10,000.00
2011

Heritage BC

Climate Rehabilitation of Heritage Buildings

Our goal is to facilitate investments in the conservation of non residential heritage properties through measures that connect the retention of heritage values with green rehabilitation, improved energy affordability and protection from hazards related to climate change and other risks, such as earthquakes. Opportunities for climate change mitigation include green rehabilitation efforts to improve energy efficiency and smart fuel choices that would help to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, with the added value of reducing operational costs for property owners, building tenants, and developers. Opportunities for climate change adaptation through the protection of heritage property from existing and future potential environmental hazards range from resilience to extreme weather events to seismic upgrades. We are collaborating with RDH Building Engineering to develop proposals for various levels of gov't &provincial utilities to place incentive funds in the Heritage Legacy Fund.Heritage BC would distribute to churches, non profits, museums, first nations,etc for energy efficiency upgrades of heritage buildings. RDH will assist in providing program design recommendations to advance the sustainability and durability of heritage properties through the Heritage Legacy Fund, in a manner that leverages other funding opportunities such as utility demand-side measures (DSM) through BC Hydro and FortisBC, emerging funding opportunities in carbon offsets and local government incentives.
$5,385.00
2015

Home Is Where We Live Lifecycles Project Society

LifeCycles' Fruit Tree Project: Harvesting Abundance in the Urban Orchard

Working with key members of our network we will reflexively asses, develop, design, implement and evaluate communication materials and food literacy programs that can be delivered in public spaces with support from social service agencies. These programs will provide skills and knowledge to help people engage as co-producers in the local food system. Program will be open to all, but targeted at those who are marginalized and living with food insecurity. Communications and programs will aim to promote a cultural shift from consumption to co-production, aiming to deepen participant's desire to participate as active agents in a healthy, sustainable food system. Collectively our choices can bring great change to how food is cultivated and produced. Much is made about the price of food, and cost is often cited as a primary barrier for healthier options. Our project challenges people to think deeper about food, to see beyond a consumer product to a local resource that requires collective stewardship and care to keep healthy. By shifting this attitude, we support more local food production and create the conditions for an equitable local food economy to thrive. Together we will begin to explore what a healthier, tastier and more responsible diet means in our region. With more aware and informed consumers - or rather co-producers - our food system is more motivated to work using techniques that safeguard food diversity, the environment and quality.
$90,000.00
2016

The Urban Seed Library will create a sustainable and transferable program model capable of institutionalizing seed collections and seed saving and biodiversity programming in BC's urban public libraries. Working with the Surrey Libraries, the Greater Victoria Public Library, and Richmond Food Security, we will collaboratively create an effective program model that will enable community members to establish viable seed collections in their local library. This project will create management systems and community resources that aim to make seeds and seed saving education freely accessible and publically shared. This will strengthen local food security, community health and biodiversity.
$25,000.00
2014

Il Centro

East Van Green

Over the past year Il Centro has developed several new "food system initiatives", specifically an Italian Market (Farmers' Market), a new Community Garden and an active food security education program in partnership with Fresh Roots Urban Farm and Slow Food Vancouver. The East Van Green initiative will build upon, and connect our existing food system activities through a "zero waste" project that will utilize a state of art food "composter" and turn our organic waste into compost which in turn will be used for our community garden and Fresh Root's urban farm located at Vancouver Technical High School-across the street from il Centro. In partnership with a local recycling company (Recycling Alternative) we will establish a closed loop demonstration project that will take organic waste from our garden, catering facilities, restaurant, and the urban farm, (located at Vancouver Technical High School), and turn it into compost for local usage. By linking our community garden, catering/food services, farmers' market, and our partner's local urban farm we hope to create a food system demonstration hub that will engage, educate and promote urban sustainability, local food production, access to local food, and organic waste management. The zero waste project will, we believe, create a micro-community demonstration model that can be replicated and utilized across the city.
$90,000.00
2015

Invasive Species Council of BC

Engaging Communities: Spotters Workshops and Community Events

To develop a Spotters Network Workshop tailored to the needs of First Nations and horticulture groups. The workshops will train individuals to identify and record invasive plants in a provincial database. The database will identify priority treatment areas for partners to complete community weed pulls and massive species mitigation activities.
$30,000.00
2010

KATZIE CULTURAL EDUCATION SOCIETY

Eco-Cultural Restoration in Katzie Traditional Territory

The Katzie First Nation have participated at multiple levels of involvement in the restoration efforts of several organizations over the past decade. The KCES recognizes that restoration success in the traditional territory can be improved with clear goals and a bioregional scale of planning based on the principles of ecosystem and adaptive management. Of particular importance is the inclusion of traditional knowledge and values. The KCES propose to address these gaps by combining both scientific and traditional knowledge and values in a restoration plan for the Katzie traditional territory. To meet this goal, an Eco-Cultural Restoration Plan will be developed and shared with community participants that will be based on a wide spectrum of values distilled from community engagement workshops. This Plan will be bioregional in scope, but will contain site-specific guidelines that will identify key issues and solutions derived from traditional and scientific knowledge. Based on the Plan guidelines, three model sites will receive restoration efforts and will be monitored for success.
$38,000.00
2014

Kingfisher Environmental Interpretive Centre Society

Debris Flood Restoration

The Kingfisher Interpretive Centre incurred heavy damage by a catastrophic debris flood that roared down Cooke Creek on May 2nd, 2014. The damage to the site and our salmon hatchery is devastating but not insurmountable. We are working hard at re-establishing our ability to raise salmon and educate today's youth. We have major repairs to undertake including building an appropriate protective structure (berm in Cooke Creek), certified by an engineer, in order to regain our regular occupancy. We would like to have the new berm built and the majority of repairs (including re-establishing our compromised water sources) completed before the next Spring freshet (May) so that we will be allowed to use the site for raising our beloved salmon and educating local school children. We would also like to rebuild our internationally acclaimed watershed model that was completely destroyed by the flood and replace our lost inventory. We would like to request assistance from the Vancouver Foundation to aid us in our recovery and help us rebuild and recover our lost materials.
$15,000.00
2014

Kitasoo Kitasoo Band Council

Community Energy

Our program supports member Coastal First Nations communities in achieving their clean energy goals. We do this by hosing a supportive 'community of practice' where local leaders learn from each other, have access to external resources on an as-needed basis, and record progress towards their implementation goals on an annual basis. This program is in its third year, and is working towards achieving the objectives of the Great Bear Clean Energy Action Plan (2011) and the updated Clean Energy Strategy (2014). This work is important as it supports a strong peer-to-peer program that helps local leaders be stewards of their environment while supporting their local economies, moving communities off diesel generators, and fostering community pride. The next two years of work will focus on engaging community memebres and famililes in each community on how to better use energy in their homes, saving money, reducing diesel generation, reducing local pollution, and improving personal and ecosystem health.
$20,000.00
2014

Groundfish research by Central Coast Nations to implement marine protected areas

Our marine use plan identifies rockfish and lingcod as cultural and economic resources that have been overfished. Further, scientists warn that declines of large predators, such as lingcod and yelloweye rockfish, may disrupt entire ecological communities. Our marine use plan also is the backbone for the MaPP initiative (mappocean.org), an ongoing partnership between the Province of BC and First Nations which is zoning allowable uses, designing a candidate network of marine protected areas (MPA) and selecting indicator species for ecosystem health. MPA implementation, however, will require further collaboration with the federal government. Crucial to that implementation, our project uses science and traditional knowledge to document the past and current status of rockfish and lingcod populations. The resulting data will support final site selection for the MPA network and provide baselines for restoration and conservation goals, thereby ensuring that federal decisions on spatial protection address First Nation concerns. Given the current momentum of MaPP, our project is very timely.
$35,000.00
2014

Kwantlen Polytechnic University Foundation

Environmental Assessment of Southwest BC's Bio-regional Food System Future

The proposed is part of the SW British Columbia Bio-regional Food System Design and Plan study. We intend to elucidate environmental impacts/stewardship potentials of future food system choices, incorporating critical environmental stewardship/enhancement elements into a design that maximizes food self-reliance. We have identified a suite of environmental indicators for quantification, modeling, & monitoring of impacts of food production on soil, air & water quality, climate change, biodiversity & ecological footprint, to quantify the current status of food production in SWBC. We will model how outcomes may change given population growth, climate change impact and agricultural land diminution & explore options for increasing regional food production while protecting water resources & habitat, reducing greenhouse gas emissions, & lowering our food ecological footprint. We will then work with stakeholders to ID & develop strategies for minimizing tradeoffs to design a system to achieve multiple objectives of environmental stewardship, increasing food self-reliance, a robust economy.
$25,000.00
2014

Lake Windermere Ambassadors Society

Citizen Science Series - Year 2 & 3

The era of climate imposed decisions regarding source water protection and water allocation for humans and the ecosystems upon which we depend, has arrived.  The Water Sustainability Act, a modernized Columbia River Treaty and localized watershed governance, will rely on accurate data, since water policy and data are inextricably intertwined. Community based monitoring includes open source, transparent, accessible, scientifically robust and indigenous relevant water data to inform decisions.  21st century challenges will require forging innovative, collaborative partnerships to collectively ensure economically and ecologically viable, climate resilient communities in Canada. 
$100,000.00
2017

LEPS

Bertrand Watershed Education Team (B-WET) Project

The B-WET project will foster private land stewardship on properties adjacent to Bertrand Creek, raise citizen awareness of watershed issues, and enhance and protect critical habitat for native and endangered species. To achieve this, Langley Environmental Partners Society will deliver stewardship information packages; work with property owners to provide practical stream stewardship advice; and work with landowners who are willing to enhance their streamside riparian area (the bank along the creek). The team will also offer watershed walking tours and Streamkeeper training (a watershed education program); watershed information presentations; school workshops; stream clean up, invasive species removal, streamside treeplanting and stormdrain marking events.
$25,000.00
2011

Lower Similkameen

The LSIB Riparian Stewardship Workshops

Six hands-on workshops take members of LSIB onto the land for riparian restoration. The project originated from the desire to combine much-needed restoration work with education to increase community capacity. Need is two-fold: (1) As stewards of the largest intact riparian matrix in the South Okanagan, we need to build internal capacity to fulfill our traditional role of caring for the land. (2) A significant stretch along the Similkameen River has been badly damaged by erosion and is caught in an escalating cycle that reduces water quality and destroys increasingly rare habitat upon which many species at risk depend. Members of LSIB have a strong commitment to land stewardship. Our active TEK committee includes young people as well as Elders. Workshops will also be open to local conservation organizations. Workshops will bring together ecological experts and traditional knowledge keepers to assist community members to assess the target area, develop a stabilization plan, remove invasive species, and undertake indigenous planting to restore habitat and improve bank stability.
$15,000.00
2012

Meal Exchange

Real Food Challenge BC: launch phase

The Real Food Challenge’s goal is to transform the environmental impacts of the millions that BC colleges and universities spend annually on food. Current policy treats this procurement as a simple ancillary service: necessary like the bookstore, but not connected to campus mission or community wellbeing. The result: campus purchasing is supporting our global agricultural industry, which is a top contributor to climate change, freshwater use and pollution, and destruction of wildlife habitat. By auditing campus supply chains and demonstrating public support for shifting purchasing policies, we will leverage the power of public procurement for investing in our province’s ecosystems.
$198,484.00
2017

Real Food Challenge B.C.

Meal Exchange will bring together campus, community, and industry partners to leverage the $20M annual purchasing of B.C.’s campuses to drive demand for ecological agricultural practices-- focusing on improving water quality, wildlife habitat, mitigating climate change-- and improve animal welfare. To do this, we are adapting the award-winning Real Food Challenge from the U.S. to B.C. It w ill shift authority and resource flows on campuses, while also changing beliefs systems about the priorities of institutional procurement, through: -The Real Food Campus Commitment: university presidents publicly commit to the goal of purchasing 20% Real Food within 3 years, mandating foodservice companies and campus administration to change procurement practices. -The Real Food Calculator: provides a rigorous definition and process, based on existing industry certifications, to audit purchasing and identify areas of improvement to reach 20% Real Food on campus. Building off one-year seed funding from Real Estate Foundation and Vancity to test the program with 6 pilot campuses, support from Vancouver Foundation will allow us to adapt and sustain this program at all 11 universities in B.C. The Test grant’s funding through 2019 will give us the runway needed to measure results-- developing the evaluation tools and data to demonstrate the impact of campus purchasing on B.C.’s environment-- and establish long-term funding with campuses to scale the program across B.C. and Canada.
$75,000.00
2016

Nature Conservancy of Canada

Community Engagement in Species at Risk Recovery

NCC is actively engaged in protecting and stewarding habitat for species at risk in British Columbia with the objective of avoiding further extinctions. In some cases, we have an opportunity to reintroduce species to areas where they formerly occurred but have become locally extirpated. Doing so dramatically enhances the chances that these species will recover to self-sustaining, viable populations over the long term. If reintroductions can be accomplished with active participation from local communities including school-aged children and families a broader base of support for habitat protection and stewardship within local communities where species at risk occur can develop. NCC is a national leader in species at risk re-introductions. Through NCC’s Conservation Volunteer program, we will host at least five events on at least three of our conservation areas in the Salish Sea region. These events will engage local communities in our efforts to reintroduce species at risk.
$15,000.00
2012

Blue Carbon: Creating a Climate Change Solution

The role played by marine ecosystems in carbon sequestration (blue carbon) has been largely overlooked in the study of climate change. Currently, on average, between 2-7% of blue carbon sinks are lost annually worldwide. Coastal areas in BC are under ever-increasing pressure from human use. This project will begin to create an institutional body of knowledge about how much carbon is being sequestered in coastal ecosystems, with an emphasis on eel grass and estuary ecosystems.
$10,000.00
2010

Nature Trust of British Columbia

KCP Landowner Outreach Program

In 2015 the Kootenay Conservation Program (KCP) worked with both it's West Kootenay and East Kootenay Stewardship Committees (55 partner organizations) to discuss KCP's role in Landowner Outreach in the Kootenay Region. The Committees identified the need to increase regional support for Landowner Outreach and addressed the need to develop a comprehensive plan for 2017/2018 to deliver: 1) a web-based landowner Stewardship Resource Centre 2) KCP landowner outreach support to partner organizations (i.e. conference/workshops, landowner resource guide, etc) In order to develop a comprehensive plan, KCP will host two 1 day facilitated workshops with both the East and West Kootenay Stewardship Committees to determine the goals for a Landowner Stewardship Resource Centre and how KCP can provide support to it's partner organizations. KCP will provide extensive background information and resources to the committees prior to the workshops and will compile the results of the workshops to create a comprehensive plan for 2017/2018.
$4,500.00
2016

Kootenay Conservation Program - Stewardship

In 2013 the Kootenay Conservation Program (KCP) worked with both its West Kootenay and East Kootenay Stewardship Committees to develop a Stewardship Framework to guide stewardship activities across the region. This framework identifies the need to increase the region's resiliency to the impacts of climate change, contribute to maintaining and/or restoring viable populations of species of interest and reducing the abundance and distribution of existing priority invasive species as well as prevent establishment of new invasive species. In order to effectively accomplish this, the KCP is proposing the further development of stewardship tracking and reporting tools, as well as the development of a relationship map to enhance stewardship activities. We are also proposing building capacity and enhancing collaboration within our partnership through the coordination of a series of conservation webinars and workshops.
$15,000.00
2014

Nuxalk Nation

Nuxalk Sputc Protection: a community-based eulachon conservation project

This innovative project will advance conservation policy and practice through the creation of a community-based Sputc (eulachon) Protection Plan. Bringing together Nuxalkmc (Nuxalk people) and resource managers, the plan will integrate traditional knowledge and science through community events, archival research, and interviews, upholding traditional ways of knowing while enhancing engagement in eulachon protection. Many recognize the value of including First Nations knowledge in decision-making, but the means by which to do so are largely undeveloped. This grassroots project –the first of its kind- will serve as an example of traditional knowledge integration in practice. Broad interest in the project has been expressed by other Nations and partners, who hope to use it as a template for future engagement. Accordingly, a strategic regional workshop will be held to share lessons learned. This project is one pillar of a cultural revitalisation initiative currently underway in Nuxalk territory, which includes the revival of an annual eulachon welcoming ceremony, a film, and research.
$30,000.00
2014

Ocean Wise Conservation Association

Ocean Plastics Initiative

The Ocean Plastics Initiative (OPI) will challenge the perception that it is ok to produce, use and dispose of large quantities of plastics that end up in our oceans. Leveraging Ocean Wise’s experience and expertise in ocean plastic research and solutions, OPI will build a network of organizations and businesses committed to reducing their plastic use. The network will provide space for innovation, identifying and addressing common challenges to reducing plastic use, and creating solutions to apply across businesses and sectors. Ultimately, OPI will help normalize plastic-free business practices, hastening the shift to less plastic entering and persisting in the ocean.
$10,000.00
2017

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