Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

Outdoor Recreation Council of B.C.

Healthy Forests-Healthy Communities

The 'Healthy forests-Healthy communities' is a non-partisan volunteer led and delivered initiative designed to catalyze discussion, dialogue and debate regarding BC forest lands management. Based on the 20 HFHC Community Dialogue Sessions held in 2011, forest dependent communities are concerned over the future of their forests and their sustainable contributions to the local economy. A 2012 activities plan has been designed to build on these results to provide more detailed recommendations and community actions. The input will be acquired from communities and concerned citizens through: 12 1-day workshops to obtain views from experts and senior implementation people; 15 1-day community workshops as a basis for community dialogue regarding community recommendations on the specific changes; reports based on the dialogue from all the workshops and summarized into a final report; 30 communications sessions informing communities of the 2011 - 2012 dialogue results and recommendations submitted to decision-makers, decision-maker influencers, communities and concerned citizens.
$20,000.00
2012

Healthy Forests - Healthy Communities

Healthy Forests - Healthy Communities is an initiative to engage a wide range of stakeholders from across the Province in a conversation about the long-term health and vitality of the forest sector. The series will include professional foresters, conservationists, environmentalists, First Nations, business, academic and community members.
$10,000.00
2011

Pacific Parklands Foundation

Restoration of Guichon Creek - Bioswale Building & Bank Restoration

Guichon Creek, situated on the BCIT campus, has been undergoing restoration work by the BCIT Fish, Wildlife, and Recreation program and the Rivers Institute. Catching the Spirit youth will work with these organizations on the restoration efforts, in particular, work on the interception of sediment and urban runoff pollution that is currently affecting the health of the creek; home to both cutthroat trout and coho salmon. This hands-on project is an opportunity for youth to help restore the creek and its habitat. The project includes the building of a bioswale, a native vegetated drainage ditch that catches and filters sediment and pollutants from urban runoff, providing cleaner less polluted water for the creek. The banks of the creek will be restored through removal of invasive species and planting of native species to improve the creeks biodiversity. Fence building along the creek's riparian area will help delineate the sensitive area of the creek. CtS Youth will learn planning, leadership and restoration techniques important for the stewardship of fish and wildlife habitat.
$2,500.00
2012

Paws for Hope Animal Foundation

Coalition of BC Animal Welfare Organizations

To build a sustainable animal welfare system in B.C., Paws for Hope is spearheading the BC Animal Welfare Coalition, a network of organizations who will work together to create a more sustainable approach to animal welfare and vastly improved outcomes for animals in BC. Twenty-one organizations, including municipal and SPCA shelters, launched the coalition in 2016 with two primary purposes: 1. To create professional operational and practical standards for rescue organizations in BC 2. To enable organizations to work together to fund and implement regional or provincial strategies to address the greatest challenges we face that lead to pet abandonment, abuse, and overpopulation Through the Coalition we will work to make systemic change to our animal welfare system by: 1. Shifting societal values: a. Changing both how citizens in our communities care for their pets and how rescue and welfare organizations carryout their work b. Influencing legislation, bylaws, and regulations that govern animal welfare to ensure they are based on research and best practices 2. Increasing organizational capacity: a. Securing greater levels of funding and applying these on a broader scale to achieve the greatest impact b. Developing common practices and increasing knowledge of those working in animal welfare to ensure the highest standards of care for our pets 3. Reaching remote and under resourced communities
$144,500.00
2016

Pembina Foundation for Environmental Research and Education

Social Housing Revitalization Pilot

The Pembina Institute is working with BC Housing, the BC Non-Profit Housing Association, construction and manufacturing companies, and non-profit partners to adapt and pilot the Energiesprong retrofit approach in B.C. The project will evaluate the potential to aggregate social housing and work towards creating the first competitive request for proposals for energy efficiency retrofits of multi tenant buildings in BC. This approach rethinks the conventional resource flows of green building initiatives by focusing benefits on low-income and marginalized communities while incentivizing industry to invest in research and development to deliver low-cost technologies and new delivery models.
$10,000.00
2017

Engaging British Columbians in shaping our collective climate legacy

This year, project staff met with 150+ organizations to better understand why & how these groups might wish to engage on climate policy. Several have become central allies. Clean Energy BC (power producers), Green Jobs BC (labour+NGOs), Climate Smart (businesses), the Bowen Group (high-emission industries + ENGOs), the Urban Development Institute (building developers), Union of BC Municipalities, Organizing for Change (ENGOs) and others have worked with us to highlight opportunities to advance climate policy collectively with their members. We are seeking funding for a 3-year Test Grant to strategically expand & deepen the participation of British Columbians in climate action. This will also allow us to respond to more requests from grassroots groups, First Nations and community leaders to provide analysis and assistance on development issues relevant to them. With climate policy windows officially open federally and provincially, groups can now advocate effectively (using a GHG emissions lens) on issues such as pipelines, tankers, fracking, LNG, etc. We will test & expand our engagement, by partnering with key allies across strategic sectors (e.g., buildings, industry, ENGOs, labour, local government, First Nations, grassroots groups and media) to engage their networks in shaping climate policy. This work will change “how we act”, “money, knowledge & people”, and “laws, policies & rules”, and in promoting a more engaged society, will inform our “values & beliefs".
$50,000.00
2016

Communities, Water & Carbon: Mitigating shale gas impacts in northeast BC

Shale gas development in northeast BC will significantly increase with the emergence of an export-oriented LNG industry. At the same time, the current regulatory framework is insufficient to protect communities from the negative impacts of hydraulic fracturing (fracking). Initial conversations with First Nations and community leaders in the northeast indicate that impacted communities would welcome information to enhance understanding of technologies, policies and best practices that could reduce the impact on water (quality and quantity – which are serious local concerns) and climate (GHG emissions). We propose to undertake research and engagement to reduce upstream shale gas development impacts in northeast BC: to provide accessible research findings and communications tools to First Nations and communities; to undertake coordinated outreach to strengthen networks across the north and to increase public awareness across the province; and to promote policies and practices with the provincial government and industry in collaboration with leaders in northeast BC.
$60,000.00
2014

Water and Energy: A Critical New Intersection

In the past several years, new energy developments - be they gas production practices or renewable electricity projects - are having an impact on water resources throughout British Columbia. The Pembina Foundation seeks the support of the Vancouver Foundation to increase the public understanding of threats that energy developments pose to our water resources. There are two specific opportunities in 2011 to do so. The first is the B.C. government's plan to introduce legislative changes to the 100 year old Water Act, through its Water Act Modernization process, and the second is the recent passage of the B.C. Clean Energy Act and the requirement for BC Hydro to develop an Integrated Resource Plan for renewable electricity development by the end of 2011.
$35,000.00
2010

PHS Community Services Society

Creating Bee Space

Our mandate is to enhance community through apiculture and to connect people & pollinators. We believe in the therapeutic value of beekeeping, its ability to connect all people to community, to nature and to themselves. We bring bees into marginalized urban communities and manage them side by side with community members through our mentorship program; we create green spaces and green opportunities for training, employment and education; we diversify our ecosystem by supporting pollinators and increase our food security by pollination of local food and production of local honey. The bee hive is the centre point of our programming, out from which a spectrum of opportunity radiates. The bees are an incredibly fertile substrate for meaningful connection, green skills training and access to nature. Our programming is socially innovative in its ability to reach out and connect to those considered hard-to-reach, welcoming and supporting individuals and their communities, building bridges of communication, de-stigmatizing bees and people and taking leadership in environmental stewardship. There is a wealth of opportunity in the city for bees and people of all kinds, and our project is helping our city to realize its potential and be a model for other cities. This project will grow our ability to offer meaningful programming that builds community capacity to support native pollinators & honey bees; extend our programming to new geographies & peoples; and embeds us in our community.
$50,000.00
2015

QQS (EYES) Projects Society

Building capacity for salmon stewardship - traditional fish weir in the Koeye

The weir project aims to build capacity, and increase engagement in resource stewardship in the Heiltsuk community of Bella Bella by resurrecting the traditional practice of building fish weirs on the Koeye River. Fish weirs were used for thousands of years by First Nations as a means of selectively harvesting salmon in large rivers; however the practice has been dormant in Central Coast communities for more than 100 years. The project stems from Qqs’ core mission of engaging youth in Heiltsuk culture and their environment, and builds upon existing youth and environment programs at Koeye, creating a unique opportunity to involve young people in a project that provides critical data for the conservation of Heiltsuk resources. The Koeye is among the most important salmon producing streams in Heiltsuk territory. Enumeration of salmon using the traditional fish weir, would greatly enhance our understanding of salmon within Koeye, and would have broad relevance for understanding salmon populations throughout the region.
$30,000.00
2012

Quamichan Watershed Stewardship Society

Restoring Wetlands in the Quamichan Watershed

The water quality of Quamichan Lake is negatively impacted by surface runoff. This project will involve watershed residents in the restoration of wetlands that will trap pollution, improve water quality, provide habitat for wildlife and offer a meaningful opportunity for the community to be involved in a local stewardship initiative.
$15,000.00
2011

Raincoast Conservation Foundation

Restoring Governance for Salmon Conservation in the Lower Fraser River and Estuary

This project addresses the failure of governments and agencies to protect salmon habitat in the Lower Fraser River and Estuary. This failure has come at the detriment of globally significant salmon runs and the First Nations, local communities, economies and other wildlife that rely on these fish. A huge opportunity now exists to test governance and funding models for delivering a First Nations and community-lead initiative that envisions salmon resilience in the Lower Fraser. Using salmon as the indicator for freshwater sustainability, an initiative focused on habitat conservation will guide planning, restoration and management, facilitating recovery of a degraded river and its salmon.
$70,000.00
2017

Creating a vision for salmon in the lower Fraser River

We will approach individuals, groups, First Nations, academics, business and municipalities who understand the landscape (ecologically and politically), and can identify the geographical and political focus required for the lower river and estuary to be a vibrant region that sustain salmon, people and local economies 30-50 years from now. Creating the document will bring disconnected groups together to share ideas and identify solutions to systemic issues including: Resources – Federal government budget and resource cuts to DFO have affected science, enforcement, habitat protection and knowledge transfer at all levels. First Nations, community groups and ENGOS are left to deal with this void. Authority – More progressive Fraser River co-coordinating bodies have been dissolved. In their place, agencies like Port Metro Vancouver now drive political and economic agendas. With legislation weakened, governing bodies removed and replaced, and policy mandates like Wild Salmon Policy unimplemented, serious losses to salmon habitat are occurring. Community groups, First Nations and municipalities cannot respond adequately. Fragmentation – There is no broad coordination around conservation planning in the lower Fraser and regional collaboration is required. Beliefs –There is a mind set that environmental protection is a choice between the economy and the environment. The opportunity to envision Salmon in the Fraser in 2050 is not yet realised.
$10,000.00
2015

Oil Free Coast: Protecting The Salish Sea

Raincoast’s Oil Free Coast initiative focuses on the threats to BC’s marine and coastal environment posed from its potential conversion to an oil tanker energy corridor. Enbridge’s Northern Gateway project and Kinder Morgan’s Trans Mountain pipeline expansion are both proposing to ship Alberta’s tar sands oil through the coastal waters of BC. These proposals raise serious concerns at global, regional and local scales. They introduce the threat of chronic and potentially catastrophic oil spills in regions that host rare, endangered, vulnerable, and ecologically valuable species and ecosystems. Further, these routes provide outlets for the export of tar sands oil, exacerbating their staggering local impact and accelerating Canada’s contribution to atmospheric carbon. Raincoast is addressing this issue through several strategies tailored to the different proponents, processes and circumstances of the north and south coasts.
$20,000.00
2012

Keeping BC's North Coast Oil Free

This project will enable Raincoast Conservation Foundation and Living Oceans Society to participate in the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency review process. They want to research and identify the risks to ecosystems associated with Enbridge’s proposal to build a pipeline from the tar sands terminal in Alberta to the BC coast and transport this oil by tanker from Kitimat to offshore markets, which presents the likelihood of oil spills in some of world’s most ecologically valuable and unique ecosystems, including the globally renowned parks and waterways of the Great Bear Rainforest and Haida Gwaii.
$40,000.00
2010

RAVEN (RESPECTING ABORIGINAL VALUES AND ENVIRONMENTAL NEEDS)

Environmental Racism Education Development Project

At a recent strategic planning session, board and staff decided to move forward with the education element of our mission. With this development grant, we will explore ways to implement the second half of the mandate outlined in our Letters Patent “...to assist aboriginal peoples in protecting and restoring the natural environment for the benefit of all people within Canada by …developing and delivering education programs to advance knowledge and understanding of available legal rights and remedies.” The development project will consist of two steps: Step 1) Educate ourselves: train staff and board about the Canadian legal system regarding injunctions, judicial reviews, appeals court processes, etc; and learn from First Nations about their systems of ‘ancestral laws’; Step 2) Engage our First Nations partners in a collaborative learning process to outline a new education program that will help us meet our mandate, including: what information the curriculum needs to cover, how could the curriculum be most effectively delivered, does the proposed program meet CRA's criteria for "advancement of education". The Vancouver Foundation’s support will be used to fund Step 2. It will help move this project forward by providing funding for us to collaborate with our Indigenous partners and explore ways in which we can meet our mandate, and provide them with a service they can use to help advance their struggle for recognition of their indigenous rights and title in the courts.
$10,000.00
2015

Regional District of Central Kootenay

Kootenay Lake Shoreline Management Guidelines

The Kootenay Lake Partnership is producing shoreline management guidelines. Both the guidelines (captured in a document) and the process to arrive at them, are important components to changing how it is that shoreline impacts are managed, mitigated, or compensated for. The KLP has been working toward management guidelines for some time – ecological inventories, archaeological studies, GIS mapping etc. – and only recently has the KLP approached the shoreline management guidelines as the beginning, not the end. The development project is the completion (integration and production) and public outreach of the shoreline management guidelines. To do this now requires assembling the datasets from all the individual studies that were completed for the lake. Integrating these means creating an index of various parts of the shoreline using a 5 category system of very high to very low ‘overall’ value. This will form the basis of directing activities by decision makers. The production component will entail the visuals, text and mapping of the datasets in a coherent way. The process that is important here is assembling the ‘partners’ which are signatory to the KLP and creating a streamlined approach to service delivery, compliance and enforcement, legislative changes, and public outreach.
$10,000.00
2015

Regional District of Okanagan- Similkameen

SOSCP Transition Planning and Capacity Innovation

This project will develop a transition planning process reflective of the current and anticipated realities for conservation and the region for the next three to five years; and a capacity innovation initiative to develop a significant resource base and accomplish biodiversity conservation goals identified in the Regional Biodiversity Conservation Strategy (in prep) for the South Okanagan Similkameen.
$27,700.00
2010

Rivershed Society of BC

Sustainable Living Leadership Program

The Sustainable Living Leadership Program (SLLP), our flagship program, trains, engages & inspires BC’s environmental leaders of tomorrow through a month long experiential learning program on the Fraser River. The SLLP equips them with skills to become effective leaders who identify & address challenging conservation & sustainability issues. The river becomes a floating classroom as they camp along its banks & experience firsthand its flora, fauna & ecosystems, and learn about watersheds (water cycle, watershed planning & management), the Fraser River (history, issues & challenges), salmon (lifecycle, issues, fisheries management) & resource use (forests, oil, value-added) while getting hands-on experience in ecology and biology. They identify changes in the landscape, discuss the impact and merits of power generation, engineering controls, energy conservation and sustainable choices. They develop leadership skills in team building, conflict resolution, communication & critical thinking, and each complete a community sustainability action plan, which they implement in their home town
$20,000.00
2013

Royal Roads University

Royal Roads University Wetland Ecosystem Restoration

This project aims to restore approximately 10 acres to a functioning wetland ecosystem with marsh, wet meadow, forested swamp, riparian wetland areas, creeks and ponds. Phase I of the project is a technical assessment of the site and public envisioning sessions. Technical experts and local artists, including Robert Bateman, will work with the community to discuss the diversity and complexity of the site and work with the public to develop a vision for the wetlands.
$19,000.00
2010

Ruby Lake Lagoon Nature Reserve Society Lagoon Society

Implementation of Sunshine Coast Biodiversity Strategy

In 2012, we launched a project to develop a Regional Biodiversity Strategy for the Sunshine Coast. Key achievements thus far include: (i) undertaking a biodiversity assessment to identify all existing data on local biodiversity; (ii) holding a 3-day long Biodiversity Summit attended by over 100 experts and stakeholders; (iii) drafting a Biodiversity Strategy, identifying common goals, objectives, and strategies to conserve biodiversity; and (iv) carrying out diverse public engagement activities reaching thousands of community members. We are requesting your continued support to build on the positive momentum, and move the Strategy from the development stage to the implementation stage. During this stage we will: (i) form Implementation Teams; (ii) create a detailed Action Plan with specific activities, timelines, targets, and lead organizations; (iii) develop a monitoring program; (iv) Publicly launch the Strategy; (v) initiate 6 pilot projects; (vi) undertake biodiversity surveys & mapping; (vii) create a Biodiversity Database, and (viii) continue public engagement activities.
$25,000.00
2012

A Regional Biodiversity Strategy for the Sunshine Coast

The Lagoon Society will work collaboratively with other organizations to engage residents in biodiversity conservation, conduct a biodiversity assessment, and develop a regional biodiversity conservation strategy. We will bring together existing information and conduct new inventories and assessments to evaluate the current status of biodiversity, assess threats, and identify high priority areas for conservation and restoration. We will bring together scientists, land managers and stakeholders at a 3-day summit to develop a biodiversity conservation framework with common objectives, coordinated strategies and effective measures to conserve, enhance and monitor biodiversity in the region. By carrying out diverse public outreach activities, we will encourage and enable residents to assist with biodiversity conservation. In the long-term, this project will increase the capacity of our community to undertake sound stewardship of biodiversity and ensure that our region maintains a connected, biologically diverse network of habitats, healthy, resilient ecosystems and ecosystem services.
$40,000.00
2011

Salal Foundation

Beyond Coal Canada

Beyond Coal Canada is a collaborative project to oppose the export of US thermal coal through Canadian ports aimed at averting accelerated climate change for the benefit of future generations and the natural world. Beyond Coal Canada is the Canadian partner in the Power Past Coal coalition that is opposing the transshipment and export of coal from Montana’s Powder River Basin. When Fraser Surrey Docks and Lafarge Quarries first proposed their coal transshipment project in 2012 most observers thought permits would be issued within months and predicted our odds of defeating the project were slim. Our primary goal was to delay approval and construction. Three years later, the proposal is stalled, with important permits in limbo, widespread municipal opposition, organized and grassroots opposition, and a number of lawsuits working their way through the courts. The changed political circumstances have opened up promising new paths to victory, as well as new options for building a foundation to prevent future coal export expansions.
$75,000.00
2015

Beyond Coal

Vancouver has pledged to be the Greenest City on Earth by 2020 (http://vancouver.ca/greenestcity)and has adopted an ambitious conservation agenda that enjoys broad support amongst its residents. British Columbia can be duly proud that it derives none of its electricity from coal-fired generation. However, the Port of Vancouver has become the largest exporter of coal on the continent and exports are expanding rapidly. In the United States concern about Climate Change and opposition to coal generation has successfully reduced the domestic market for thermal coal. This huge surplus of US thermal coal is now making its way to Asian markets through Vancouver, making our region complicit in the dirtiest industry on earth. In the past year the Beyond Coal campaign has attracted the support of 24,000 residents of the lower mainland and 13 area municipalities have adopted resolutions opposed to the expansion of coal ports. With the support of Vancouver Foundation we can prevent the expansion of thermal coal exports and gain greater local control over Port Metro Vancouver.
$25,000.00
2014

Building a Freshwater Constituency in B.C.

Dogwood Initiative proposes a twelve month intensive base-building project for North Vancouver Island and the Lower Mainland that will develop a large, mobilized constituency deeply concerned with freshwater, protecting fish habitat and strong fisheries protection. The opposition to tankers on the B.C. coast that is evident in polling results is tied closely to concern for aquatic habitat and species. Commercial and sport fisheries are major economic forces that contribute to the economic sustainability of this region and recently proposed changes to federal fisheries regulations pose a serious threat to the resilience of these communities. Fish and fisheries are an important a part of the local identity which transcends differences and has the potential to unite public opinion in such a way as to compel protection of the resource. This provides a values-based approach to generating awareness of and opposition to pipeline development that threaten the ecological integrity of the coast.
$20,000.00
2012

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