Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

Tides Canada Initiatives Society

Campaign Accelerator

Campaign Accelerator (“CA”) seeks to change how people act in the political arena to ensure their environmental values are a key part of the debate. CA’s theory of change is that if organizations visibly mobilize pro-environment voters on election day, then government and opposition will be more inclined to strengthen environmental protection because they believe those voters can be decisive in elections. As parties see how their stance on various environmental issues helped or hurt them in the election in key parts of the Province, government will become more positively responsive to those issues and see the value of a strong environmental track record, resulting in better laws and policies. Engagement organizing (“EO”) is based on the belief that “organized people beats organized money.” BC’s tanker campaign is a prime example, particularly the work of Dogwood Initiative to mobilize thousands through locally-grounded organizing nodes across the Province. The 2013 BC election saw all parties wanting to “look strong” on tankers in response to this force. CA flips this approach on its head: training and mentoring grassroots leaders so they can apply EO tools on local environmental issues. CA is building a network of community leaders using EO to enable local citizens to hold their elected officials to account and ensure government recognizes that environmental values (beyond big campaigns like tankers) are widespread and can move voters. The 2017 election is a first test.
$70,000.00
2016

Green Legacies 2.0 Guide – Laying the Groundwork for Secure & Affordable Land Access for Agriculture

British Columbia faces significant challenges related to secure and affordable land access for food production, especially for a new generation of farmers interested in building alternative and sustainable food networks that utilize environmental best practices to enable regional food security. This project will provide key context and essential information to potential donors and professional advisors about important forthcoming work and the need to establish a sustainable food future in British Columbia. Farmers face challenges around the transfer of land from one generation to another. 50% of today's farmers will be retiring in the next ten years. Research by the Community Farms Project and the Farmland Access for Food project has identified an urgent need for innovative land access and governance models. We are in the process of developing an updated and revised edition of our original Green Legacies Guide, published in 2002, (https://www.for.gov.bc.ca/hfd/library/documents/bib89033.pdf) which will have both a print and online edition. We require funding in order to develop a new section on the foodland/farmland initiatives in BC so as to ensure donors and professional advisors are aware of this vital work. Once models are put in place by the foodland / farmland community, the details of the gifting and succession options will be incorporated into future updated editions.
$5,000.00
2015

Hartley Bay Great Bear LIVE

The Gitga’at First Nation, located in Hartley Bay on the north coast of B.C., have developed land and marine use plans for their territory that include as key principles: protecting ecosystem integrity, ensuring their unique and rich culture is preserved and enhancing their capacity to engage in research and resource management. Gitga’at entities have requested that PWI collaboratively develop and deploy a Great Bear LIVE remote camera project in Gitga’at territory. Great Bear LIVE is a technologically advanced remote monitoring system developed by PWI to monitor terrestrial and marine wildlife through video and audio which can be streamed live online for broader public engagement and education. This project will meet 2 key community-identified objectives: 1. To employ non-invasive research and broad-based public education tools to further environmental protection, understanding and long term monitoring of Gitga’at traditional territory. 2. To engage and prepare youth as future stewards of Gitga’at territory by providing training in technology,wildlife monitoring and stewardship.
$60,000.00
2014

Clean Energy Transition Project, Clean Energy Canada at Tides Canada

Our organization is working to encourage provincial leadership on climate disruption, while lowering overall energy use and diversifying the provincial economy. We are building consensus on how British Columbia might best reduce its dependence on carbon-based commodities such as oil, gas, and coal, and instead create an ecologically responsible low-carbon society that creates prosperity through clean-energy innovation. We created the project after identifying a significant gap in the climate and energy advocacy landscape; there was no NGO focused on accelerating Canada’s transition to a low-carbon society. Our scope is national, but energy is provincially regulated and we are in Vancouver, so we devote special attention to British Columbia—which has a strong base of policy leadership to build upon. We primarily work with thought leaders and policy makers to build support for policy action among a powerful and diverse array of business, government, and civil society actors, but we are also engaging with citizens to support leadership on climate change, clean energy, and efficiency.
$35,000.00
2013

BC Transboundary Headwaters Conservation Initiative

Northwest BC and the adjoining strip of Alaska embrace a premier North American ecological hotspot. Here 6 spectacular watersheds, all with BC headwaters, link remote upland, boreal, temperate rainforest and marine ecosystems. Still mostly intact, they are exceptional salmon strongholds and biodiversity reservoirs as well as home to First Nations. Mining development on a scale not unlike the Alberta tar sands will impact the transboundary watersheds. A new transmission line bringing industrial power north is the driver. Rivers Without Borders (RWB) promotes visionary, balanced, ecosystem planning for this region which includes First Nations, communities and stakeholders, and is international in scope. In contrast, BC government appears to be pursuing a pro-development agenda without appropriate regulatory oversight. Our proposal lays groundwork to create a regional International Watershed Board under the auspices of the Boundary Waters Treaty. This will provide balance to a mining boom, creating a framework and expectation to focus on water quality and habitat protection.
$25,000.00
2013

Strengthening Leadership for Freshwater Protection

We propose to launch a water leaders program to facilitate the implementation of a robust outreach and communications plan around opportunities to protect and enhance British Columbia's freshwater ecosystems. The program will engage a minimum of 5 freshwater organizations throughout BC with the specific mandate to educate and engage the BC public in efforts to protect, enhance and restore the provinces freshwaters. A core element of the project is the development of a sophisticated outreach and communications plan that connects with the values of British Columbians. Designed with the help of public opinion research, the final product will inspire BC residents to become water champions. The overall goal of our efforts is to protect clean and sufficient freshwater in British Columbia to sustain a healthy economy and support vibrant ecosystems. As the Province of British Columbia seems poised to make changes to its century old Water Act, there is an important opportunity to create dialogue in the public on how best to prioritize and allocate water, while protecting healthy flows.
$20,000.00
2012

Protecting Fish Habitat and Freshwater in the Upper Fraser Basin

This project will further the work between the First Nations of the Yinka Dene Alliance (YDA) and Dr. Jack Stanford, a Professor of Ecology at the University of Montana specializing in river and freshwater ecology. It will combine Dr. Stanford’s impact assessment of the proposed Northern Gateway Pipeline on the Sutherland, Stuart, and Salmon Rivers within the YDA traditional territories with the traditional ecological knowledge holders of the YDA First Nations. The final results will inform the YDA traditional decision-making process.
$40,000.00
2011

Climate & Conservation in BC: Baseline Mapping and Communications Development

Since our founding in 2000, ForestEthics has helped secure agreements to protect more than 26 million hectares around the world. We are currently working to build awareness in government and communities across British Columbia (BC) about the importance of conserving forests, wetlands, and other ecosystems to mitigate the ecological and economic impacts of climate change. Through targeted public outreach, we are helping BC protect its unique natural resources today to create a buffer that will help future generations stave off challenges related to human-caused shifts in the environment. With the support of the Vancouver Foundation, we will undertake two important steps toward this effort; we will: 1) develop a geographic information system (GIS)-based map detailing the total land area in British Columbia currently managed by various conservation designations (parks, wildlife reserves, etc.); and 2) produce analysis and sample communications materials for future focus-group testing to help us better inform and engage communities in the province.
$5,000.00
2010

Organizing for Change

This project's goal is to build the political and public prominence of environmental issues and strengthen the ability of organizations to effect change in BC. Their focus is on environmental issues that are the greatest priority in BC. Their organization has emerged as the only forum where a significant part of the BC environmental community can coordinate and collaborate on various issues, and develop strategies to enhance collective power.
$15,000.00
2010

Tofino Botanical Gardens Foundation

Cigarette 'Bio-Digester' Development Project

Cigarette butts are a widespread and highly toxic watershed pollutant; and while community support for addressing this issue is strong, there is some disagreement about the best approach, and few natural, community-based solutions. We have identified a model which shows promise in turning cigarette waste into non-toxic soil and need support to develop it further and test for effectiveness and scalability. This project aims to offer a system of local and community-based remediation of cigarette waste that is low-cost, low-tech, and scientifically sound that empowers citizens, businesses, organizations and government to effectively reduce the amount of cigarettes affecting water quality.
$10,000.00
2017

Treaty 8 Tribal Association

First Nations Site C Leadership Summit

The Treaty 8 First Nations (Doig River, West Moberly, Prophet River, and Halfway River) are proposing to host a gathering on Sep. 16-17 at the Fort St. John Curling Club that places emphasis on BC, AB, and NWT First Nation leaders within the Peace River watershed, Peace-Athabasca and Mackenzie Deltas. Environmental groups and non-government organizations will also be invited. The purpose of this 1.5 day Summit is to further support and acknowledge participants common relationships and unique dependence on the water flows of the Peace River. The cumulative impacts associated with the past and future hydroelectric developments on the Peace River are the core issues that will summon everyone to share stories, network and foster relationships, mount common strategies and messaging, and build a strong alliance. Activities will include an inventory of the human capital within the participants’ organizations, their assets, and inputs into future action and education plans. Keynote speakers on energy policies/climate change and a field trip to the proposed Site C dam location.
$7,500.00
2010

UBC - Faculty of Forestry

Visualizing Urban Futures with Community Energy

Public understanding and behaviour change on energy use is critical to reducing carbon footprints and building resilient communities. Since the idea of low-carbon community-wide energy systems is new in Canada, most people have little idea how typical neighbourhoods in Metro Vancouver can be retrofitted to be climate friendly. CALP proposes to engage communities, using compelling new visualisation tools to actively involve non-experts in learning about community energy. This proposal builds on an ongoing research study with Neptis Foundation and the GEOIDE Network Centre of Excellence, which is developing prototype visualization tools - "digital stories" about community energy, based on data in two pilot BC municipalities: Richmond and Surrey. This project will help build awareness and community capacity for climate change solutions. It will involve multiple stakeholders in developing a visual information toolkit for use in demonstrations, workshops, and web media to reach the "silent majority" who are often not engaged in social learning and community decision-making.
$30,000.00
2012

University of Victoria

The Ocean Soundscape

June 16, 2014, the Vancouver Aquarium and ONC co-hosted a workshop for BC hydrophone experts/owners to discuss how best to coordinate, manage, interpret, and monitor the soundscape of our ocean. This coalition devised a cohesive vision to create a combined digital coastal network that would foster a safe and sustainable marine environment through the creation of four working groups (Research, Technical Development, Data & Products, and Policy). It is imperative to understand the impact on marine life of the volume and frequency of human-made sound in the sea, which is rapidly increasing. This coalition is comprised of scientists, industry and coastal communities working together to quantify how the ocean soundscape is changing and developing solutions to influence policies. ONC seeks funding for a 1-year Ocean Soundscape Coordinator to facilitate the four working groups and deliver their results based on sound scientific principles and document them in a report. The report will form the basis of a larger combined funding proposal targeting other entities to deliver their results.
$25,000.00
2014

University of Victoria - Faculty of Law

Mining Law Reform in British Columbia

While mining has been a key industry in BC, outdated regulations that are now below Canadian standards means that mining poses grave environmental and public health risks. Mine-affected communities and First Nations bear a disproportionate burden of this risk. This project aims to fix the root of mining challenges in BC by reforming old mining laws. In addition to raising public awareness about mining’s impact and the urgent need for law reform, it will deliver workshops to enhance public participation and highlight the need to take Indigenous rights into account. New mining regulation in BC will protect people and the environment, and decrease public liability for mining operations.
$150,000.00
2017

UVIC - POLIS Project on Ecological Governance

Achieving Water Sustainability: BC Water Law and Policy Reform

This project seeks to enable a comprehensive approach to water law and watershed governance in BC. Public policy and law reform on water resources and management is on the verge of a major leap forward. There is an opportunity to affect laws, policy and governance resulting in lasting impacts on the ground through organizing a range of actors and communicating leading practices from around the world.
$90,000.00
2011

Victoria Immigrant and Refugee Centre

Multicultural Environmental Education Program (MEEP) Transition Phase

In 2008, VIRCS became the first immigrant service agency in Canada to incorporate environmental education into its operations by creating the Multicultural Environmental Education Program (MEEP). MEEP functions by linking newcomers to community environmental programs and services which both engage newcomers in environmentalism and add cultural diversity to the work of environmental agencies. The ultimate objective is to promote a more inclusive and multicultural environmental movement. The initial funding structure of MEEP provided an adequate budget for the program development over a two-year period. The two-year period resulted in a well-developed program with a great public profile; however, funding for a full-time coordinator is no longer sustainable and we will no longer be able to retain a coordinator come late-March. To overcome these challenges we propose to create a sustainable program by interweaving environmentalism into the entire operations of VIRCS rather than continuing to run MEEP as an autonomous program.
$5,000.00
2011

Watershed Watch Salmon Society

Connected Waters: Reconnecting lower Fraser Valley waterways for healthy salmon and communities

This project aims to upgrade water flow and flood risk management of local waterways to better account for social/ecological values like wild salmon, clean water, and natural beauty. It will change: Basic routines: Landowners and municipalities will use fish-friendlier flood control systems, improving habitat quality and fish abundance, while maintaining flood control and agricultural functionality. Socially, restored ecological connectivity will improve community enjoyment and recreation. Resource flows: Restoration of ecological connectivity within the lower Fraser floodplain will become a higher priority in federal, provincial, and municipal flood management studies and spending. Authority flows: Federal laws (e.g. Fisheries & Navigation Protection Acts) and provincial laws (e.g. Water Sustainability Act) meant to protect salmon, water, and community access will be better applied to these formerly high-value habitats that are now primarily governed by BC’s Diking Act. First Nations’ rights and title may also be applied. Beliefs: Citizens will increasingly view these degraded waterways as vibrant sources of community enjoyment. Improvements to our initial target waterways—along with regional, provincial, and federal policy improvements—should create a systemic “ripple effect” across the region as more citizens, stewardship groups, First Nations, and municipalities see that changing the status quo in flood management is possible on their local waterways.
$196,981.00
2016

West Coast Environmental Law Research Foundation

Climate Law in our Hands

What if climate impacted communities could demand accountability from the fossil fuel industry? BC is uniquely placed to force a conversation about industry responsibility for climate change and its costs. We will foster legal and community action aimed at demanding accountability from fossil fuel companies, ultimately leading to a local government class action against fossil fuel companies. By focusing on harm suffered by BC communities, we can hold Chevron, Exxon and similar companies responsible for the impact of their global share of emissions. Public demands for accountability and especially a lawsuit will both require and result in broader public education and discussion. Convincing local governments to take such action will require British Columbians to understand and support fossil fuel industry accountability. The success of litigation depends on a broad societal shift in understanding the role of the fossil fuel industry in causing climate change. We will undertake provincial coordination, support and networking between groups seeking to promote public discussion of the harm caused to their communities by the fossil fuel industry and the potential for litigation, including providing legal educational materials;* and provide submissions and assistance to local governments that might act as plaintiffs in a class action. *Any tasks involving activities considered political by the CRA will be carried out to a large extent by our sister organization, WCELA
$225,000.00
2016

Protecting the Communities and Ecosystems of the Salish Sea

Zoom online meeting software Meeting the challenge of climate change impacts like sea level rise has created an opportunity to deepen regional collaboration and improve environmental management and protection in the Salish Sea. A scientific report commissioned by West Coast in 2014 from the Fisheries Centre at UBC presents the “business case” to protect our coastal ecosystems, and documents case studies from other coastal areas around the world showing how coastal “green” infrastructure has effectively managed the impacts of extreme weather events. However, the effectiveness of green infrastructure measures is relatively limited if only implemented in a single municipality, and planning and implementation at a regional scale is necessary, which is what we will facilitate through this project. Our own legal research and analysis to date has helped identify examples of mechanisms and structures that would be effective in planning, co-managing, monitoring and enforcing environmental protection at a regional scale using an integrated approach, and there is willingness among key actors for regional collaboration.
$30,000.00
2014

Environmental Strategy Retreat

We are collaborating with other organizations and First Nations involved in the Tar Sands Campaign (TSC) to implement a training, networking and information sharing retreat to bring together individuals working on tar sands issues. The TSC is a complex campaign that includes native and non-native activists from across BC, related campaigns in Europe, the US, and Canada, on diverse topics of pipelines, markets, and tar sands production. Ensuring our wide range of campaigners have the capacity to collaborate effectively been a challenge. In 2012 we overcame this through a retreat for over 80 activists that focused on skill building, learning, and network strengthening. It was an incredible success and led to significant cross border organizing, cross sector collaboration and better practices in communications. In 2013, we would like to hold the Retreat again with a focus on new priorities as identified from 2012 evaluations, such as more in depth strategic planning and training on how to connect and engage BC residents and communities. We will offer a minimum of 30 scholarships.
$7,500.00
2013

Managing Cumulative Impacts on BC's Ecosystems and Communities: Legal Solutions

Many rural regions are simultaneously dealing with proposals for mining, forestry, hydroelectric, oil and gas development, and related roads, power-lines and other infrastructure, while urban areas face increasing populations and demands for land use, yet BC currently lacks a legal framework to proactively and comprehensively manage the cumulative impacts of these issues to protect the environment and human well-being. In this project we will focus on two ‘hot button’ issues where political, economic and public attention is bringing the question of cumulative impacts management to a head, in order to create momentum behind needed reforms: 1) liquified natural gas development, particularly as it impacts multiple values in the Northwest; 2) sea level rise in the Lower Mainland. We will rely on West Coast’s multi-year research of best practices in cumulative impacts management from around the world, including our analysis of more than 25 regional governance models as a foundation, and work with a range of allies to support the development of collaborative solutions in these 2 regions.
$28,000.00
2013

Enabling a Greener BC Economy: Law Reform for Forest Ecosystems & Climate Change

Policies are urgently needed in British Columbia to protect the environment and sustain BC communities in an era of climate change. This multi-year project will assess the existing laws governing BC forests (approximately 80% of BC's land base) and advocate for corresponding law and policy reform.
$40,000.00
2011

Enabling a Greener BC Economy: Law Reform for Forest Ecosystems & Climate Change

To develop a law reform proposal on evolving forest policy and legislation to address climate change and enable new revenue streams for forest-dependent communities. This project would refine and advance this proposal by engaging with opinion leaders from conservation groups, First Nations, industry, local governments and senior government decision-makers (both provincial and First Nations).
$30,000.00
2010

West Kootenay Environmental Centre

Engaging West Kootenay Industry Stakeholders in a Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Future

To avoid global warming beyond 1.5C by 2100 we need to decarbonize by 2050. Each country and community needs to do its fair share to transition to a 100% renewable energy economy to avoid the worst climate impacts. Cities are leading the transition at the community-level, which includes transportation, electricity and buildings. As cities lead, industry’s carbon pollution must be addressed to reach 100% renewable. We’re working with local governments and industry workers to clarify the government’s relationship with industry in the transition to renewables, and with local residents to garner support for renewable energy in communities that rely on carbon-intensive industry for local jobs.
$10,000.00
2017

Western Canada Wilderness Committee

The Time is Now - Legislation for BC’s Endangered Species

The goal of this project is to engage in extensive outreach and mobilization to further increase awareness about species at risk in British Columbia, and to advocate for strong endangered species legislation. Using and building on our outstanding educational resources from the past year – including video footage of species at risk, stunning photos, striking child and youth-produced artwork, compelling presentations, and our educational report – the Wilderness Committee proposes to extend our outreach and mobilization to a broader audience. Specifically, we will focus on three areas: children, youth, and young adults (through their educational institutions); a broader geographic focus; and increased outreach to the general public. With the upcoming BC election, this is a politically strategic time to put endangered species on the agenda. If the election results in a government committed to endangered species legislation, which is likely, this 18-month period will be instrumental in achieving strong, effective stand-alone legislation to protect endangered species.
$35,000.00
2013

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