Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

Access Pro Bono Society Access Pro Bono

Rural and Disabled Access to Pro Bono Legal Services Project

The project would extend pro bono legal advice services to people in unserviced rural and remote communities, and to people with mobility issues. Using Skype-based televideo clinics, local clients could connect to a pro bono lawyer in a distant location. For individuals who cannot attend a clinic, and/or whose qualifying legal issues are urgent, the project would offer a hotline for limited civil legal matters. The project would fund the design and modification of systems for the hotline, intake staffing, and the purchase of televideo and hotline equipment.
$40,000.00
2010

ACORN Institute Canada

Strengthen Communities by Closing the Digital Divide

AIC, partnered with ACORN Canada, will explore the links between the digital economy and health outcomes for low income people. Systemic change will be influenced by connecting community members with leadership development, community engagement, and opportunities to inform policy to address root causes of inequality in health and prospects. Evidencing lived experience to challenge the current telecommunications policy architecture, the project aims to unlock the various health benefits resulting from digital inclusion. Overall, we seek to address the intersections between poverty, health and the digital economy to close the digital divide and improve health outcomes for low income Canadians.
$10,000.00
2017

Housing Policy Impact - Action Research Project

To increase knowledge of the social determinants of health related to precarious sub-standard housing in an effort to have an impact on housing policy in BC. This will be done by (1) creating a better understanding of the social determinants of health related to living conditions in low income market housing in BC; (2) building and strengthening the bridges tenants have with the staff and decision makers at the provincial ministry responsible for housing, regional health authorities and municipal bylaw departments, and (3) increase the inter-agency knowledge between social, public and private organizations about the negative health impacts on low income renters in BC. The target population of the project will be primarily the staff and decision makers at the provincial ministry responsible for housing, regional health authorities and municipal bylaw departments, and secondarily low and moderate income families in rental properties in Surrey, New Westminster, Burnaby and Richmond.
$50,000.00
2013

Healthy Homes Project

Tenants in Surrey often have to live in housing that has detrimental effects on their health and well being due to poor maintenance of the rental property. This project will create dialogue between city staff and politicians, tenants and other key stakeholders, starting civic debate, and conversations that include effected low and moderate income tenants, about policy solutions that the city can enact or amend to build a livable city for everyone.
$27,000.00
2011

Adoptive Families Association of British Columbia

Social Innovation Cohort: Adoption Expo

A grant towards participation in a development process to explore the concept of an Adoption Expo and assess the impact of such an event for ourselves and for our prospective partners. Following the development phase we will then have a clearer understanding of the logistics and the outcomes that can drive a decision to hold an Adoption Expo.
$7,500.00
2016

Alberni-Clayoquot Continuing Care Society

Co-operative Elder Care Initiative

One of the most critical social issues facing Canadians is the nation's rapidly aging demographic and the absence of affordable care for seniors. This project addresses the lack of high quality, affordable and responsive elder care to seniors and their families. Community-based co-operatives are proven to provide care that is more responsive and affordable because they are controlled by users and their families. By utilizing the tools and knowledge developed in this project, care givers and community groups will greatly increase their capacity to provide alternative forms of elder care by replicating community-based, user controlled models piloted in this project. The project also addresses the serious problem of isolation and loneliness faced by a growing number of seniors as well as the lack of support to their caregivers. The project will strengthen social capital in local communities and lessen the isolation of seniors by helping communities to develop co-operative models for the provision of care and the development of social networks for the support of the elderly.
$106,000.00
2012

SENIORS HEALTH INFORMATION PROJECT (SHIP)/ TRAINING THE TRAINER

This project will adapt and deliver four educational workshops for seniors in three key rural/suburban areas on Vancouver Island. Planned and delivered in collaboration with local project partners, the workshops will aid participants in developing skills and strategies to effectively navigate the Home and Community Care System, as they engage with health professionals and support one another in accessing care. Participants will receive a session binder containing information specific to their region and information on provincial services and associations for seniors.
$40,000.00
2011

Alberni-Clayoquot Regional District

A Protocol for Collective Action: Steps towards an Airshed Management Plan for the Alberni Valley

This projects aims to improve air quality in the Alberni Valley. Air pollution is a complex problem that crosses political boundaries and involves everyone. The Alberni Valley is particularly vulnerable to air pollution due to its geography and climate. The Alberni Air Quality Society intends to partner with government bodies, organizations, and the local community to create and formalize a process by which to manage air quality. This will provide an overarching framework to address air pollution in all its forms, whether that be from backyard burning or industrial emissions. This collective action would reduce the human illness and the economic impacts that are associated with air pollut
$10,000.00
2017

Arts in Action Society

Groundswell: Grassroots Economic Alternatives

Our proposal comes in two parts: first a training institute where young people (up to age 35) can come together for a year's intensive program to imagine, design and build new enterprises including cooperatives, collectives, non-profits, arts and artisanal enterprises, self-employment scenarios and other grassroots configurations: all explicitly contributing to a community economic fabric of reciprocity. Each program will run for ten months: 4 months of intensive work, a month of strategizing and proposal planning, then 5 months of supported project development. Participants will develop the comprehensive skills - individually and collectively needed to run their own enterprises. The second piece is that we will link graduates and their new initiatives into a network of mutual aid and support. Each graduating participant and enterprise will be a member of the Groundswell Co-op relying on and supporting one another, and being supported by the collective institutional, organizational and financial resources. Ongoing reciprocity and interconnectedness is the key to our proposal.
$70,000.00
2012

Association of Neighbourhood Houses of British Columbia

Resurfacing History: Land and Lives in Mount Pleasant

Resurfacing History addresses how living in urban centred affects the cultural continuity for Aboriginal people and explores how to build resilience to increase social connection and belonging. The project focuses on developing a community process for promoting understanding between cultural value systems, and to build capacity for Aboriginal people to be part of a mechanism that preserves culture, explores knowledge and integrates actionable steps that can make social ecosystems and infrastructure work for urban communities. Creating onversations focused on land use from Aboriginal worldview & shared pathways are critical for nurturing solidarity & connection.
$10,000.00
2017

West End Community Food Centre

Over a third of people in the West End of Vancouver live on a low and inadequate income and are food insecure. Historically society has responded to hunger (food insecurity) with charity, even though we know that quick fixes do not change the circumstances for people who are living in poverty. Gordon Neighbourhood House is working with partners to shift the conversation and action towards justice and away from charity. As a community, we have the power to spark long lasting changes, whether within our community or at a policy level, that ensure everyone’s right to good food by eliminating poverty. We do this work by bringing people together through food programs, dialogues, and training.
$150,000.00
2017

Sharing Homes and Lives; Aging, Affordability, and Happiness

Our project involves: 1. Convening seniors and their families, young people and youth leaving care, and other potential stakeholders, in order to understand their very diverse contexts and to begin (a) articulating a value-base and vision that will ground how shared lives models are to be conceived and supported, (b) imagining and co-designing variants to life-sharing models that would fit individual's own, diverse circumstances, (c) beta-testing things like risk-sharing agreements, matchmaking/meetup formats and events, new screening and monitoring frameworks, and so on. 2. Investigating match-making services and algorithms to prototype more effective matching tools than conventional application and assessment processes 3. Designing the right infrastructure/container that will support these activities, including the roles, policies, practices and technology components. 4. Investigating the power of peer-to-peer models like Air BnB and Uber in order to see how these sorts of emerging solutions might apply or be adapted to our context, Through these sorts of activities, we (1) change the ownership of the model and begin to build participation in a movement (2) create an opportunity to build a new discourse around risk that we jointly share and mitigate, (3) create diverse solutions and models; (4) establish policy and infrastructure AFTER we know what works, versus services patterned after existing policies and system cultures.
$131,000.00
2016

Mount Pleasant Food Recovery Project

Research the feasibility of food cycle intervention to recover usable food from multiple sources, facilitate remanufacturing by local participants and volunteers into a quality source of food for vulnerable populations, specifically seniors, aboriginal, youth and immigrants. We have observed a large amount of fresh produce moving from the local shops to food waste and recycling mechanisms and also aware of large food insecure populations in Mount Pleasant, especially the vulnerable. The feasibility study will scope out: • potential sources of usable waste food produced by businesses and retailers • existing local food recovery practices (e.g. Fruit Tree project) • existing service providers, community based groups, and other groups involved in the local food system, and other potential partners • ascertain ideas and potential projects that would result in a value added conversion process (e.g. explore opportunities to engage the vulnerable in the process; ie provide training and job opportunities, life skills, capacity building and community development) • barriers or challenges faced by stakeholders in food recovery processes, and recommendations on how to address barriers to undertake the a food recovery program • ways to redistribute food that meets stakeholders needs • recommendations for moving forward on plan implementation
$10,000.00
2015

Cedar Cottage Community Advocate Project

It is our intention with this Develop Grant to explore a community based Advocate model. We want to develop a neighbourhood infrastructure to bridge community to systems. The long term goal of this social innovation idea is to train community residents in systemic issues and develop advocate skills. These trained residents will host a Community Advocate hours, a time residents can go to for neighbours to support engagement in systemic support systems like disability and housing. This advocacy support is intended to bridge, navigate, ask questions and reach resolutions. It is the intention of the Neighbourhood House with the support of a Vancouver Foundation Development grant to explore this resident-to-resident community advocate model community to build resiliency, support networks and solidarity of the whole community. By bridging the flow of system knowledge through community-based relationships it will increase the ability of the Neighbourhood House to support individuals to navigate and engage in complex systems necessary to improve upon our communities social determinants of health in the areas of income and social status, social support networks and education and literacy. In our development year we will seek to document and analyze experiences of residents within systems and develop community specific advocate training through a project collective made up of partner organizations and residents guiding the outcomes with the Project Coordinator.
$10,000.00
2015

West End Community Food Centre

The Community Food Centre we envision in Vancouver's West End takes a 3-pronged approach to addressing inequities in our food system, in a way that is rooted in the right to food. We will work with existing emergency food resources in our community to transition to providing people who access them with healthy, fresh food in a dignified environment. We aim to develop community capacity, skills and engagement for producing and preparing food through a comprehensive suite of skill-building and educational programs offered at various locations in our community, and we aim to hire, develop, train and support a group of peer advocates to operate in our community to challenge the systemic issues which create and entrench poverty. While each of these approaches has the potential to drive change on one scale or another, a community's level of food security is generally understood to embody each of the three prongs working in synergy. By providing individuals with multiple points of access to varying levels and scales of support and advocacy, we create the necessary conditions for a nimble response to the specific issues and concerns of our community. The West End Community Food Centre will be based on a model in which programs and initiatives are animated in various locations throughout our community (this may change down the road). Starting with programs in satellite sites throughout a community is also the model of growth for most of Vancouver's Neighbourhood Houses.
$110,000.00
2015

South Vancouver Seniors Hub: Innovations in Seniors -led community development.

Working collaboratively with seniors, community service partners, multiple funders & academic researchers, SVNH is developing a Hub to address seniors’ vulnerabilities in SE Vancouver. Rigorous evaluation during the 1st phase of the Hub’s development demonstrated built capacity resulting in: a broader scope of senior’s activities; increased ability of seniors from all cultural backgrounds to act as leaders; & increased capacity for operating a seniors led participatory hub model. We identified the need for a 2nd phase of development focusing on sustainability & expansion of the model into other neighborhoods to be achieved by: developing a larger & more skilled volunteer base; expanding the hub’s diversity outreach strategies to include new groups of underrepresented seniors; developing tools & training seniors to disseminate information about the model with other organizations; & building capacity for SVNH to independently undertake evaluation to inform ongoing development of the model & for demonstrating its value for seniors & potential to inform policy for determinants of health.
$135,000.00
2013

Frog Hollow Neighbourhood House Pathways Out of Poverty

Pathways Out of Poverty pilots a strength-based collaborative project to build capacity among immigrant women & their families to: -Understand possible pathways out of poverty & for achieving a living wage. -Navigate training/employment services & related community supports -Develop problem solving, networking & assertiveness skills needed to address personal & systemic barriers. -Develop leadership & speaking skills to facilitate participation in public dialogue to address systemic barriers & key employment issues. The need for programming to support local immigrant women to move into paid employment was identified in 2006 and 2009-10 through the Frog Hollow Community Connections Project. In 2009, Jennifer Chun, Department of Sociology at UBC, broadened this exploration by facilitating 4 city wide neighbourhood cafes to identify the issues prevent women obtaining a "living wage" or work in their field of expertise. Pathways Out of Poverty is a collaboration between organizational stakeholders & immigrant women to positively address issues of personal & systemic exclusion.
$76,302.00
2012

Mount Pleasant Neighbourhood Houses: A Sturdier Neighbourhood Fabric: Weaving Policy, People and Place Together

The project will connect diverse residents of Mount Pleasant more deeply to their local area, while enlarging their capacity to positively influence the way in which Mount Pleasant develops. The need was identified through participation in the local area planning process (2007-10); consultation (2011-12) with City staff and simultaneously with grassroots groups (focused on public realm, food security, community development and the arts), local business and service agencies; plus research from external bodies. The project (over 3 years) will develop and implement collaborative skills modules for policy-focused Working Groups; coordinate and support efforts of local area stakeholders through policy implementation regarding the built environment, public realm and social and economic development; facilitate effective partnership with municipal staff and academic teams in implementing the Mount Pleasant Community Plan; develop effective protocol for early engagement of local stakeholders by property developers; and create a toolkit to benefit multiple neighbourhoods and municipalities.
$100,000.00
2012

Kitsilano Neighbourhood House: Seniors for Seniors Project: Building a One-Stop Place for Westside Seniors

The Seniors for Seniors Project is a senior-led initiative that will address the Health and Wellness & Belonging and Inclusion of seniors living on the Westside. The project will engage local seniors and community partners to help design, develop and implement a new one-stop Seniors Resource Centre for vulnerable seniors and individuals with physical disabilities to access info and referral services, navigate systems of care and support, and participate in programs that promote healthy living and social connection. The Kits House Seniors Resource Centre is centrally located on 8th & Vine Street, close to public transit and is wheelchair accessible. The Westside has one of the highest concentrations of seniors in Vancouver, and many are living alone with a low income, lacking support systems, feeling isolated and facing many health challenges. The Seniors for Seniors Project will address community-identified needs by providing advocacy, information and peer support services, health and social programs, and opportunities for seniors to volunteer and contribute in meaningful ways.
$60,000.00
2012

Kitsilano Neighbourhood House - Welcoming Neighbours Initiative

The Welcoming Neighbours Initiative aims to provide newcomers to Vancouver’s westside with much needed opportunities for meaningful social inclusion, language practice and increased community literacy. This is one of the only programs on the westside to facilitate access and inclusion for isolated, vulnerable newcomers and will provide a welcoming and inclusive environment for newcomers and new immigrants. The project includes volunteer training in cross-cultural community literacy, inclusive approaches and language support.
$20,000.00
2010

South Vancouver Neighbourhood House - Seniors Hub: Working with Seniors Using the Neighbourhood House Approach

Three neighbourhood houses (NH) documented their model for working with and building the capacity of seniors in a report titled Sustaining Seniors Programs through the Neighbourhood House model, 2009. A Union of BC Municipalities Grant in partnership with the City of Vancouver and United Way supported this project. Resulting from this report a collaborative relationship was formed between the NH and the Seniors Funders table- including Vancouver Coastal Health SMART Fund, City of Vancouver Social Planning, United Way, New Horizons, and Vancouver Foundation. The hub vision includes a place where seniors: gather and make connections across generations; find neighbourhood- based activities that support aging in place; are valued for their skills and abilities; and engaged in active roles in the community. To implement this model a coordinator is required along with resources to support seniors capacity building. An evaluation framework will allow us to monitor our progress and share our learnings
$120,000.00
2010

Aunt Leah's Independent Lifeskills Society

Bootstrap Project: Employing Youth from Care

Very rarely do young people get their first jobs and employment experiences due to ‘merit’. Instead, social connections and mentoring are the actual bridging mechanisms for entering young people into first jobs, thus giving them the opportunity to learn essential employment skills (e.g. interpersonal skills, time management, work ethic, etc.). Foster youth necessarily, and through no fault of their own, come from upbringings of poverty, abuse and neglect and are removed from their family. They do not have the necessary strong social and familial networks in order to get these first job experiences. This project will find empathetic employers who will provide this mentoring role.
$58,905.00
2017

B.C. Society of Transition Houses

Increasing Access for Aboriginal Women

The project, Increasing Access for Aboriginal Women, has two major aims. First, to consult with transition houses that serve Aboriginal Women on and off reserve and to consult with Aboriginal women who have either previously accessed transition house services or those who have been turned away from accessing transition house services in a minimum of two communities across BC. Second, based on the research, to develop and implement promising practices to better serve Aboriginal Women, to pilot these practices and to externally evaluate these practices to see if Aboriginal Women are able to access transition houses and if they are served in a culturally appropriate manner while accessing these services. All aspects of the project will be led by a project Advisory Committee and overseen by a Project Coordinator. The project Advisory Committee will be comprised of transition houses that serve a large number of Aboriginal Women, Aboriginal Women with lived experience, BC Housing, Aboriginal Housing Management Association, Provincial Office of Domestic Violence for BC and other groups.
$25,000.00
2013

Toward a Learning Centre

This project seeks to develop an online knowledge resource where programs can share best practices and policies in helping women and children fleeing violence. It will identify and provide access to online training tailored to meet workers’ needs. It will transform existing training modules into an accessible on-line format to enable the training of workers to meet their clients needs.
$50,000.00
2010

BC Aboriginal Child Care Society

Transitions for Urban Indigenous Children and Families: Documentation and Partnership Development

This project responds to parent and early childhood educator concerns about transitions to formal schooling for urban Indigenous children, and the difficult conversations that are necessary—especially concerning cultural safety—among urban Indigenous early childhood education and schools. It is important to document challenges and gather invested partners to create changes to systems to properly support urban Indigenous children and families’ transitions on their terms, and those of UNDRIP. The project also explores the challenges of supporting requisite Indigenous leadership and related partnership development in an era of reconciliation among Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples.
$44,000.00
2017

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