Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

ACORN Institute Canada

Strengthen Communities by Closing the Digital Divide

AIC, partnered with ACORN Canada, will explore the links between the digital economy and health outcomes for low income people. Systemic change will be influenced by connecting community members with leadership development, community engagement, and opportunities to inform policy to address root causes of inequality in health and prospects. Evidencing lived experience to challenge the current telecommunications policy architecture, the project aims to unlock the various health benefits resulting from digital inclusion. Overall, we seek to address the intersections between poverty, health and the digital economy to close the digital divide and improve health outcomes for low income Canadians.
$10,000.00
2017

Adoptive Families Association of British Columbia

Social Innovation Cohort: Adoption Expo

A grant towards participation in a development process to explore the concept of an Adoption Expo and assess the impact of such an event for ourselves and for our prospective partners. Following the development phase we will then have a clearer understanding of the logistics and the outcomes that can drive a decision to hold an Adoption Expo.
$7,500.00
2016

Alberni-Clayoquot Regional District

A Protocol for Collective Action: Steps towards an Airshed Management Plan for the Alberni Valley

This projects aims to improve air quality in the Alberni Valley. Air pollution is a complex problem that crosses political boundaries and involves everyone. The Alberni Valley is particularly vulnerable to air pollution due to its geography and climate. The Alberni Air Quality Society intends to partner with government bodies, organizations, and the local community to create and formalize a process by which to manage air quality. This will provide an overarching framework to address air pollution in all its forms, whether that be from backyard burning or industrial emissions. This collective action would reduce the human illness and the economic impacts that are associated with air pollut
$10,000.00
2017

Association of Neighbourhood Houses of British Columbia

Resurfacing History: Land and Lives in Mount Pleasant

Resurfacing History addresses how living in urban centred affects the cultural continuity for Aboriginal people and explores how to build resilience to increase social connection and belonging. The project focuses on developing a community process for promoting understanding between cultural value systems, and to build capacity for Aboriginal people to be part of a mechanism that preserves culture, explores knowledge and integrates actionable steps that can make social ecosystems and infrastructure work for urban communities. Creating onversations focused on land use from Aboriginal worldview & shared pathways are critical for nurturing solidarity & connection.
$10,000.00
2017

Mount Pleasant Food Recovery Project

Research the feasibility of food cycle intervention to recover usable food from multiple sources, facilitate remanufacturing by local participants and volunteers into a quality source of food for vulnerable populations, specifically seniors, aboriginal, youth and immigrants. We have observed a large amount of fresh produce moving from the local shops to food waste and recycling mechanisms and also aware of large food insecure populations in Mount Pleasant, especially the vulnerable. The feasibility study will scope out: • potential sources of usable waste food produced by businesses and retailers • existing local food recovery practices (e.g. Fruit Tree project) • existing service providers, community based groups, and other groups involved in the local food system, and other potential partners • ascertain ideas and potential projects that would result in a value added conversion process (e.g. explore opportunities to engage the vulnerable in the process; ie provide training and job opportunities, life skills, capacity building and community development) • barriers or challenges faced by stakeholders in food recovery processes, and recommendations on how to address barriers to undertake the a food recovery program • ways to redistribute food that meets stakeholders needs • recommendations for moving forward on plan implementation
$10,000.00
2015

Cedar Cottage Community Advocate Project

It is our intention with this Develop Grant to explore a community based Advocate model. We want to develop a neighbourhood infrastructure to bridge community to systems. The long term goal of this social innovation idea is to train community residents in systemic issues and develop advocate skills. These trained residents will host a Community Advocate hours, a time residents can go to for neighbours to support engagement in systemic support systems like disability and housing. This advocacy support is intended to bridge, navigate, ask questions and reach resolutions. It is the intention of the Neighbourhood House with the support of a Vancouver Foundation Development grant to explore this resident-to-resident community advocate model community to build resiliency, support networks and solidarity of the whole community. By bridging the flow of system knowledge through community-based relationships it will increase the ability of the Neighbourhood House to support individuals to navigate and engage in complex systems necessary to improve upon our communities social determinants of health in the areas of income and social status, social support networks and education and literacy. In our development year we will seek to document and analyze experiences of residents within systems and develop community specific advocate training through a project collective made up of partner organizations and residents guiding the outcomes with the Project Coordinator.
$10,000.00
2015

Britannia Community Services Centre Society

Britannia Community Carving Pavilion

Our social innovation is to test an integrated recreation, education, cultural and social service programming model that builds resilience and empowerment in areas that affect lives in this culturally relevant facility. The objective is to create community driven types of activities that follow values established by the community to guide the stewardship of this important and unique facility. Objectives which focus on 3 core themes: Adhering to specific cultural protocols: 1. Consult and involve Aboriginal Elders 2. Showcase the history of First Peoples 3. Promote cross-cultural sharing and learning Creating standards of practice that are in keeping with the community’s desired values: 4. Build effective governance 5. Make the Carving Pavilion a gathering place 6. Practice inclusivity & embed low-barrier protocols Designing a wide range of programs that promote Aboriginal arts and culture, and provide opportunities for intercultural and intergenerational learning and sharing: 7. Create a community carving project 8. Create for-credit opportunities 9. Showcase Aboriginal art 10. Offer programs beyond carving This is innovative because this model requires formal institutions such as the City of Vancouver, Vancouver School Board, Vancouver Public Library and Vancouver Board of Parks and Recreation to endorse, adopt and participate in non-Western governance and decision making in the delivery of services.
$10,000.00
2015

British Columbia Law Institute

Older Womens Dialogue Project Development Grant (Ms. Krista James/Ms. Kasari Govender)

In 2012 the CCEL received funding from the United Way Lower Mainland for the Older Women’s Dialogue Project, a 1-year project identifying the pressing law and social policy issues impacting older women. We started this work because while there has been much focus on seniors’ issues, there has been little consideration of how these issues may differently or disproportionately affect older women. After meeting with over 350 women we appreciate that some women are very marginalized and hard to reach, and that women want to do more than identify problems; they want to do something about them. The CCEL and West Coast LEAF are developing a project concept and further collaborations to continue this work involving older women. The project will involve: (1) Further community-engaged research—focus groups, interviews—aimed at reaching marginalized older women (e.g. Aboriginal women, women with disabilities) 100-200 women; (2) Compilation, analysis of findings—including plain language summary of work in multiple languages; (3) Community-engaged resource development, involving 2-4 different communities of older women (50-200 women).During the development phase we will identify strategies for connecting with especially marginalized older women, identify appropriate knowledge-sharing and dissemination strategies that respond to community-identified priorities, and work with 2-4 communities to develop project plans focused on the pressing law and policy issues they want to work on.
$9,960.00
2013

Burnaby Community Connections Society Burnaby Community Services

System Navigation for Burnaby’s Working Poor

10% of Burnaby residents are working but still living in poverty. They are struggling with low wages, under-employment and a high cost of living. The patchwork of available programs are hard to access and aren’t enough to help them break the cycle of poverty. To empower people with low incomes to change their lives, this project will test a supportive self-advocacy approach, including training on navigating the system, coaching on employment and housing, a community of practice, peer-to-peer mentoring, transportation assistance and temporary housing if needed. To promote system change, a Steering Committee composed of system representatives will share and act on the learnings.
$10,000.00
2017

Campbell River Beacon Club

Computer Training

The project for which the Campbell River Beacon Club is asking funding is to offer weekly computer classes in house to the membership at no cost to the participants. Members will learn how to access the Internet and the services it offers, including on line mental health peer communities and mental health related websites (e.g. Mood Disorders Association of BC, Canadian Mental Health Association, BC Schizophrenia Society), job search sites and educational opportunities. Weekly sessions will include training for Windows and related Microsoft Office programs (e.g. Word, Excel, Access, Power Point and Publisher). They will learn how to use email, from setting up an account, to attaching documents to using proper etiquette. As more businesses are using social media to promote themselves, the project will also include sessions about Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn. They will also learn how to safely navigate the Web, being made aware of predators and scams.
$6,500.00
2010

Canadian Centre For Policy Alternatives

Getting it right: structuring, implementing & evaluating an effective poverty-reduction plan for BC

Thousands of British Columbians experience poverty and struggle to care for their children, participate in their communities and fulfill their aspirations. Our 2008 report, A Poverty Reduction Plan for BC, identified the key elements of an effective public policy strategy to significantly reduce and eventually eliminate poverty. We seek to build on this work and meaningfully engage with BC’s new government as they launch a basic income pilot and develop a poverty reduction plan. A well-designed, transparent and accountable strategy that targets the root causes of poverty has the potential to be game-changing and greatly improve the health and well-being of communities across the province.
$10,000.00
2017

Canadian Nurses Foundation

BC Indigenous Community Based Mentorship Program Supporting Indigenous Nurses for Success

Indigenous Peoples are committed to advancing the health and wellness of communities. Given the current health care crisis, the numbers and retention of Indigenous nurses must increase to provide needed culturally safe care. A BC Indigenous community based mentorship program proposes strategies to ensure success of Indigenous nursing students and retention of employed Indigenous nurses. Partnerships with Indigenous community leaders and organizations, and BC schools of nursing will build on a community needs based framework. Ensuring Indigenous peoples are fully represented in healthcare roles, has far-reaching implications for the health of Indigenous individuals and communities.
$10,000.00
2017

Carnegie Community Centre Association

Social Innovation Cohort: Our Community Vision for Mental Health

A grant to participate in a development process to explore ideas around utilizing the experiential knowledge of participants and includes two key components: community participatory research and a grassroots visioning process. Through the participatory research portion of the project we are seeking to contribute to a broadened understanding of the societal and social determinants of mental health, especially the issues and barriers specifically faced by low-income DTES resident with mental illness. This first phase has already started and we have been having regular weekly meetings to plan the research process. Building on research findings emerging from the first phase, our second objective is to co-create a shared community vision of mental health in the DTES. By engaging in practical community research and knowledge production, participants not only learn new skills but see themselves in a position of competence, as experts of their own health and wellbeing, while also obtaining valuable knowledge and information about the structures surrounding them. This approach will combine participation and knowledge to foster DTES residents confidence and leadership abilities to meaningfully participate in decision-making forums and processes, sustain broader community involvement, and work with related community groups to build consensus, strength and new relationships towards improving their own mental health as well as the wider health of their families and community.
$7,500.00
2016

Our Community Vision for Mental Health

The project is based on the recognition that housing is a primary and fundamental social determinant of mental health. It seeks to give low-income Downtown Eastside residents living with mental illness, trauma, and disability the power to contribute to—and seek knowledge about—their health by developing a new “residents first” approach to supportive housing provision and management. Their influence is integral to bettering social housing. We will facilitate spaces to draft and establish best practices and guidelines for meeting and decision-making. We observe an urgent need to work well in coalition, in good communication with other organizations, groups, networks, and services and we can contribute to their longevity. Part of our work will be to strengthen our community member's capacity to participate in decision-making structures. Through visual description, creative form, mapping, media we will address language barriers related to literacy and translation. We can influence the representation of our community. This work will advance our knowledge of supportive housing provision. Amplifying residents' voices and experience informed and grounded in the experience and needs of existing and future social housing residents. As a peer-led project, this plan will have at its core the fundamental belief that people living with mental illness, addictions, and poverty should be able to make basic decisions concerning the day-to-day activities in their lives and homes.
$10,000.00
2016

Christ Church Cathedral

Social Innovation Cohort: Transforming Food Outreach Programs

A grant to participate in a development process ito explore the connection between and amongst volunteers, participants, and outside supports, with the goal of re-designing our programs to increase connectivity and reduce social isolation. This will be achieved by: • Reviewing the Cathedral’s existing food outreach and its suitability for the homeless population in the downtown business district through - Consulting with existing participants to determine their own needs and reasons for participating in the Cathedral’s food outreach programs - Consulting with existing volunteers to determine their own needs and reasons for participating in the Cathedral’s food outreach programs - Consulting with other downtown churches and service providers to assess current services in the immediate area • Prototyping, workshopping and designing opportunities – with the assistance of volunteers and participants – new or re-envisioned program offerings that respond to the most clearly articulated needs - Surveying the Cathedral’s volunteer database to determine availability and willingness to serve in these ways - Developing and/or strengthening partnerships with other service providers and voluntary organizations in downtown Vancouver that will help respond to these needs - Identifying trained professionals who can assist with new initiatives as identified in project plan
$7,500.00
2016

The Maundy Cafe

Systemic change beyond the Cathedral relies on vulnerably sharing the lessons learned through our year-long program transformation process with faith-based organizations seeking a way to deepen community engagement. This project will catalyze systemic change by building on faith leaders’ recognition of social isolation as a major issue facing their communities and neighbourhood networks. By sharing our experiences we will encourage other organizations to take similar risks to address the bigger issues of loss of community and economic bifurcation. The project will create toolkits, training programs, and workshops that will help other faith-based organizations to transform the entire process of food preparing, serving, composting, and cleaning into the vehicle by which inclusion, participation and community resiliency can be strengthened. We will also influence systemic change through the provision of focused opportunities for study and practical hands-on learning. In collaboration with our partners including other non-profits and local businesses, we will host public keynote events focused on how others can address social isolation, as well as workshops and voluntary opportunities for enterprises looking to channel their corporate social responsibility.
$10,000.00
2016

City of New Westminster

New Westminster Food Summit and Food Security Action Plan & Sustainability Framework - DEVELOP GRANT

A key social issue that the project is trying to address is the lack of equitable access to healthy, nutritious and culturally-appropriate food in New Westminster. A key focus of the food security summit is to identify gaps, needs and opportunities; enhance access and expand availability and choice of food; and, facilitate capacity, collaboration and relationship-building among food providers, as well as to share information about new models and delivery systems. The final product will be a food security action plan and sustainability framework, which will guide the City and its community partners into the future, and assist in implementing the City's Community Poverty Reduction Strategy.
$4,810.00
2017

Clayoquot Biosphere Trust Society

Alberni Clayoquot Food Security Action

Food security exists when everyone has physical and economic access to adequate amounts of nutritious and culturally-appropriate food. In the Alberni Clayoquot region, food security is a significant concern, with high rates of poverty and one of the highest rates of child poverty in BC. We have many rural and remote communities, high food prices, transporation barriers and a high cost of living. Our goal is to create a collaborative action plan including our communities, First Nations, organizations, schools, and businesses to find innovative but practical action for policy and social change to meet the food security needs identified in poverty reduction planning with our local leaders.
$6,444.00
2017

Columbia Valley Community Foundation

Columbia Valley Non-profit Capacity Building Program

Local non-profits are often best positioned to respond to communities, however, in rural settings they face a number of challenges. Small populations face common issues and challenges but have few human resources to deliver programs and projects. In order to be effective, they must be more efficient. The Columbia Valley Community Foundation wants to develop a strategy to build the capacity they need. Ongoing support may allow them to react faster and more effectively to needs; communicate, collaborate, and celebrate success together; equip passionate people within organizations with the tools they need to serve their communities, and help to fill gaps when community members move on.
$10,000.00
2017

Community Foundations of Canada

BC Food Systems Symposium - March 7, 2014

The purpose of this initiative is to bring together BC Food Systems Network members, community foundations and other food funders, and other key stakeholders to explore and enable working together in more intentional, strategic and effective ways.
$10,000.00
2014

BC Food Systems Symposium - March 7, 2014

The purpose of this initiative is to bring together BC Food Systems Network members, community foundations and other food funders, and other key stakeholders to explore and enable working together in more intentional, strategic and effective ways.
$1,511.60
2014

Community Housing Land Trust Foundation

Aging in Place Project

The Aging in Place Project will assist housing co-ops and seniors living in co-ops to plan for a future in which: seniors remain in their co-op homes as long as possible; seniors’ homes are adapted, as far as practicable, to suit their changing needs; and seniors are connected to and actively participate in their co-op communities. The project will develop and model an active program of community supports for seniors living in housing co-ops and explore a range of options for improving seniors’ quality of life in co-ops by tackling the physical, social and financial obstacles they may face. The project will address issues of concern to seniors around the physical condition of co-op buildings, their financial security and their social connections within their co-op communities. Seniors will participate in decisions around the design, delivery and evaluation of the project to ensure that it will have an enduring impact on their lives and on the lives of their fellow co-op members as they age in place.
$10,000.00
2013

District of Invermere

Columbia Valley Shared Solar Initiative

The Imagine Invermere Implementation Committee is seeking to address energy security for the Columbia Valley by developing a Community Shared Solar Initiative, allowing community members to invest in solar energy production on municipal buildings to reduce their energy bills, reduce their municipal tax bills, and potentially see a future return on their investment. Community shared energy production can buffer rising energy costs and ensure more predictable energy costs for citizens, helping to ensure more secure financial futures in community households.
$5,000.00
2017

District of North Vancouver

Collaborating to Increase Access to Healthy and Sustainable Food for Children at School

We propose a breakfast program for children at Sherwood Park Elementary School that is prepared at the commercial kitchen at the TWN community centre, transported to and served at the school. We will create a system to rescue and utilize surplus grocery store food in the breakfast. The goal is to create a pilot that is replicable and scalable, incorporates Food Safe protocols for the rescued food, and to develop an operating manual for how to incorporate surplus food into food procurement practices for this and other healthy food access programs. We are looking for support from the Vancouver Foundation to allow us time to build the necessary partnerships, clarify roles and responsibilities and develop protocols and procedures. While we have had preliminary discussions with champions at some of the organizations (TWN and SD44), further work is required before final approvals are in place and there are more organizations and discussions needed to transition our idea into reality. This socially innovative project aims to: Change the resource flows in the social systems of the school and TWN community by redirecting grocery store food that might otherwise go to waste or compost; Change beliefs about the importance of food/nutrition in helping children achieve optimal educational outcomes; Preserve community ‘edible food’ surplus and demonstrate opportunity for higher use of this food; Create opportunities for training hours for PC1 Chefs who work at the TWN commercial kitchen
$9,550.00
2015

Downtown Eastside Neighbourhood House

Social Innovation Cohort: LET’S SPEAK UP! : VOLUNTEER DEVELOPMENT AND COMMUNITY LEADERSHIP PROJECT FOR THE DTES

A grant to participate in a development process in order to explore ideas around the structural barriers created by legislation of the Charity and Societies legislation that contribute to barriers. Analyze and articulate ways that organizations by-laws create barriers and create paternalism Assess whether there is an interest on the part of DTES Charity groups to meaningfully engage the resident population Set up workshop and focus group schedules, identify outside resource, contact guest speakers and facilitators to give the leadership training workshops to pilot a community voices project that trains and engages local residents in civic leadership and engagement Draft interview scripts based on findings from the initial research, and contact interviewees to develop a schedule. Launch workshops marketing and promotion by various channels, and recruit participants for the workshops. Conduct interviews Non-profit board chairs. Implement workshops and collect feedback. Analyze data of interviews. Implement workshops and collect feedback. Draft final research report. Develop volunteer training curriculum with the volunteer coordinator. Final research report due. Final volunteer training curriculum completed.
$7,500.00
2016

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