Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

ACORN Institute Canada

Strengthen Communities by Closing the Digital Divide

AIC, partnered with ACORN Canada, will explore the links between the digital economy and health outcomes for low income people. Systemic change will be influenced by connecting community members with leadership development, community engagement, and opportunities to inform policy to address root causes of inequality in health and prospects. Evidencing lived experience to challenge the current telecommunications policy architecture, the project aims to unlock the various health benefits resulting from digital inclusion. Overall, we seek to address the intersections between poverty, health and the digital economy to close the digital divide and improve health outcomes for low income Canadians.
$10,000.00
2017

Alberni-Clayoquot Regional District

A Protocol for Collective Action: Steps towards an Airshed Management Plan for the Alberni Valley

This projects aims to improve air quality in the Alberni Valley. Air pollution is a complex problem that crosses political boundaries and involves everyone. The Alberni Valley is particularly vulnerable to air pollution due to its geography and climate. The Alberni Air Quality Society intends to partner with government bodies, organizations, and the local community to create and formalize a process by which to manage air quality. This will provide an overarching framework to address air pollution in all its forms, whether that be from backyard burning or industrial emissions. This collective action would reduce the human illness and the economic impacts that are associated with air pollut
$10,000.00
2017

Association of Neighbourhood Houses of British Columbia

Resurfacing History: Land and Lives in Mount Pleasant

Resurfacing History addresses how living in urban centred affects the cultural continuity for Aboriginal people and explores how to build resilience to increase social connection and belonging. The project focuses on developing a community process for promoting understanding between cultural value systems, and to build capacity for Aboriginal people to be part of a mechanism that preserves culture, explores knowledge and integrates actionable steps that can make social ecosystems and infrastructure work for urban communities. Creating onversations focused on land use from Aboriginal worldview & shared pathways are critical for nurturing solidarity & connection.
$10,000.00
2017

Mount Pleasant Food Recovery Project

Research the feasibility of food cycle intervention to recover usable food from multiple sources, facilitate remanufacturing by local participants and volunteers into a quality source of food for vulnerable populations, specifically seniors, aboriginal, youth and immigrants. We have observed a large amount of fresh produce moving from the local shops to food waste and recycling mechanisms and also aware of large food insecure populations in Mount Pleasant, especially the vulnerable. The feasibility study will scope out: • potential sources of usable waste food produced by businesses and retailers • existing local food recovery practices (e.g. Fruit Tree project) • existing service providers, community based groups, and other groups involved in the local food system, and other potential partners • ascertain ideas and potential projects that would result in a value added conversion process (e.g. explore opportunities to engage the vulnerable in the process; ie provide training and job opportunities, life skills, capacity building and community development) • barriers or challenges faced by stakeholders in food recovery processes, and recommendations on how to address barriers to undertake the a food recovery program • ways to redistribute food that meets stakeholders needs • recommendations for moving forward on plan implementation
$10,000.00
2015

Cedar Cottage Community Advocate Project

It is our intention with this Develop Grant to explore a community based Advocate model. We want to develop a neighbourhood infrastructure to bridge community to systems. The long term goal of this social innovation idea is to train community residents in systemic issues and develop advocate skills. These trained residents will host a Community Advocate hours, a time residents can go to for neighbours to support engagement in systemic support systems like disability and housing. This advocacy support is intended to bridge, navigate, ask questions and reach resolutions. It is the intention of the Neighbourhood House with the support of a Vancouver Foundation Development grant to explore this resident-to-resident community advocate model community to build resiliency, support networks and solidarity of the whole community. By bridging the flow of system knowledge through community-based relationships it will increase the ability of the Neighbourhood House to support individuals to navigate and engage in complex systems necessary to improve upon our communities social determinants of health in the areas of income and social status, social support networks and education and literacy. In our development year we will seek to document and analyze experiences of residents within systems and develop community specific advocate training through a project collective made up of partner organizations and residents guiding the outcomes with the Project Coordinator.
$10,000.00
2015

Kitsilano Neighbourhood House - Welcoming Neighbours Initiative

The Welcoming Neighbours Initiative aims to provide newcomers to Vancouver’s westside with much needed opportunities for meaningful social inclusion, language practice and increased community literacy. This is one of the only programs on the westside to facilitate access and inclusion for isolated, vulnerable newcomers and will provide a welcoming and inclusive environment for newcomers and new immigrants. The project includes volunteer training in cross-cultural community literacy, inclusive approaches and language support.
$20,000.00
2010

BC Association of Community Response Networks

Forming Community Response Networks to address adult abuse and neglect

As our population ages, there is more abuse, neglect and self-neglect among vulnerable adults. Financial abuse is the most common form of senior abuse. Community Response Networks (CRNs) are a proven vehicle for service providers and community members to develop a coordinated response in the detectection, intervention and prevention of abuse. Currently, there are no CRNs in Vancouver and the Lower Mainland (except on the North Shore). This project is designed to work with local communities within the city and surrounding municipalities over a three-year period to form up to 10 CRNs.
$15,000.00
2011

Britannia Community Services Centre Society

Britannia Community Carving Pavilion

Our social innovation is to test an integrated recreation, education, cultural and social service programming model that builds resilience and empowerment in areas that affect lives in this culturally relevant facility. The objective is to create community driven types of activities that follow values established by the community to guide the stewardship of this important and unique facility. Objectives which focus on 3 core themes: Adhering to specific cultural protocols: 1. Consult and involve Aboriginal Elders 2. Showcase the history of First Peoples 3. Promote cross-cultural sharing and learning Creating standards of practice that are in keeping with the community’s desired values: 4. Build effective governance 5. Make the Carving Pavilion a gathering place 6. Practice inclusivity & embed low-barrier protocols Designing a wide range of programs that promote Aboriginal arts and culture, and provide opportunities for intercultural and intergenerational learning and sharing: 7. Create a community carving project 8. Create for-credit opportunities 9. Showcase Aboriginal art 10. Offer programs beyond carving This is innovative because this model requires formal institutions such as the City of Vancouver, Vancouver School Board, Vancouver Public Library and Vancouver Board of Parks and Recreation to endorse, adopt and participate in non-Western governance and decision making in the delivery of services.
$10,000.00
2015

Burnaby Community Connections Society Burnaby Community Services

System Navigation for Burnaby’s Working Poor

10% of Burnaby residents are working but still living in poverty. They are struggling with low wages, under-employment and a high cost of living. The patchwork of available programs are hard to access and aren’t enough to help them break the cycle of poverty. To empower people with low incomes to change their lives, this project will test a supportive self-advocacy approach, including training on navigating the system, coaching on employment and housing, a community of practice, peer-to-peer mentoring, transportation assistance and temporary housing if needed. To promote system change, a Steering Committee composed of system representatives will share and act on the learnings.
$10,000.00
2017

Burnaby Seniors Outreach Services Society

ManTalk

The ManTalk project aims to reduce social isolation and expand a faltering support network for the most vulnerable of the oldest-old population in our community, men who are not able to independently change their own situations. Facilitated group activities which include education, discussion and emotional support will be established in community and residential venues designed to foster new social connections and encourage meaningful activity.
$10,175.00
2012

Canadian Centre For Policy Alternatives

Getting it right: structuring, implementing & evaluating an effective poverty-reduction plan for BC

Thousands of British Columbians experience poverty and struggle to care for their children, participate in their communities and fulfill their aspirations. Our 2008 report, A Poverty Reduction Plan for BC, identified the key elements of an effective public policy strategy to significantly reduce and eventually eliminate poverty. We seek to build on this work and meaningfully engage with BC’s new government as they launch a basic income pilot and develop a poverty reduction plan. A well-designed, transparent and accountable strategy that targets the root causes of poverty has the potential to be game-changing and greatly improve the health and well-being of communities across the province.
$10,000.00
2017

Canadian Mental Health Association - BC Division

Developing Socially Inclusive Strategies: Policy Implications of Innovative Community Programming - A Knowledge Exchange Event

$12,782.85
2013

Canadian National Institute for the Blind

Ensuring Accessibility for British Columbians with Vision Loss

Canada is a prosperous and technologically advanced society yet many Canadians with vision loss are excluded from social and economic opportunities. The lack of skills training and support results in 65% unemployment of working age adults with vision loss and 50% earning less than $20,000 annually. The harsh reality is only 45% of blind or partially sighted Canadian children graduate high school compared to 90% of sighted kids. To tackle these challenges, CNIB Specialists train those with vision loss to access information using assistive devices. These devices coupled with the skills taught by CNIB Specialists increases self-reliance, personal capacity and the ability to be productive, contributing community members. Our project, Ensuring Accessibility for British Columbians with Vision Loss, ensures no one in our province with vision loss is denied the fundamental right to access information. With your support we will expand our stock of assistive devices to eliminate our wait list and meet the increasing demand for vision rehabilitation services and equipment in British Columbia.
$20,000.00
2014

Canadian Nurses Foundation

BC Indigenous Community Based Mentorship Program Supporting Indigenous Nurses for Success

Indigenous Peoples are committed to advancing the health and wellness of communities. Given the current health care crisis, the numbers and retention of Indigenous nurses must increase to provide needed culturally safe care. A BC Indigenous community based mentorship program proposes strategies to ensure success of Indigenous nursing students and retention of employed Indigenous nurses. Partnerships with Indigenous community leaders and organizations, and BC schools of nursing will build on a community needs based framework. Ensuring Indigenous peoples are fully represented in healthcare roles, has far-reaching implications for the health of Indigenous individuals and communities.
$10,000.00
2017

Carnegie Community Centre Association

Our Community Vision for Mental Health

The project is based on the recognition that housing is a primary and fundamental social determinant of mental health. It seeks to give low-income Downtown Eastside residents living with mental illness, trauma, and disability the power to contribute to—and seek knowledge about—their health by developing a new “residents first” approach to supportive housing provision and management. Their influence is integral to bettering social housing. We will facilitate spaces to draft and establish best practices and guidelines for meeting and decision-making. We observe an urgent need to work well in coalition, in good communication with other organizations, groups, networks, and services and we can contribute to their longevity. Part of our work will be to strengthen our community member's capacity to participate in decision-making structures. Through visual description, creative form, mapping, media we will address language barriers related to literacy and translation. We can influence the representation of our community. This work will advance our knowledge of supportive housing provision. Amplifying residents' voices and experience informed and grounded in the experience and needs of existing and future social housing residents. As a peer-led project, this plan will have at its core the fundamental belief that people living with mental illness, addictions, and poverty should be able to make basic decisions concerning the day-to-day activities in their lives and homes.
$10,000.00
2016

Christ Church Cathedral

The Maundy Cafe

Systemic change beyond the Cathedral relies on vulnerably sharing the lessons learned through our year-long program transformation process with faith-based organizations seeking a way to deepen community engagement. This project will catalyze systemic change by building on faith leaders’ recognition of social isolation as a major issue facing their communities and neighbourhood networks. By sharing our experiences we will encourage other organizations to take similar risks to address the bigger issues of loss of community and economic bifurcation. The project will create toolkits, training programs, and workshops that will help other faith-based organizations to transform the entire process of food preparing, serving, composting, and cleaning into the vehicle by which inclusion, participation and community resiliency can be strengthened. We will also influence systemic change through the provision of focused opportunities for study and practical hands-on learning. In collaboration with our partners including other non-profits and local businesses, we will host public keynote events focused on how others can address social isolation, as well as workshops and voluntary opportunities for enterprises looking to channel their corporate social responsibility.
$10,000.00
2016

Columbia Valley Community Foundation

Columbia Valley Non-profit Capacity Building Program

Local non-profits are often best positioned to respond to communities, however, in rural settings they face a number of challenges. Small populations face common issues and challenges but have few human resources to deliver programs and projects. In order to be effective, they must be more efficient. The Columbia Valley Community Foundation wants to develop a strategy to build the capacity they need. Ongoing support may allow them to react faster and more effectively to needs; communicate, collaborate, and celebrate success together; equip passionate people within organizations with the tools they need to serve their communities, and help to fill gaps when community members move on.
$10,000.00
2017

Community Foundations of Canada

BC Food Systems Symposium - March 7, 2014

The purpose of this initiative is to bring together BC Food Systems Network members, community foundations and other food funders, and other key stakeholders to explore and enable working together in more intentional, strategic and effective ways.
$10,000.00
2014

Community Housing Land Trust Foundation

Aging in Place Project

The Aging in Place Project will assist housing co-ops and seniors living in co-ops to plan for a future in which: seniors remain in their co-op homes as long as possible; seniors’ homes are adapted, as far as practicable, to suit their changing needs; and seniors are connected to and actively participate in their co-op communities. The project will develop and model an active program of community supports for seniors living in housing co-ops and explore a range of options for improving seniors’ quality of life in co-ops by tackling the physical, social and financial obstacles they may face. The project will address issues of concern to seniors around the physical condition of co-op buildings, their financial security and their social connections within their co-op communities. Seniors will participate in decisions around the design, delivery and evaluation of the project to ensure that it will have an enduring impact on their lives and on the lives of their fellow co-op members as they age in place.
$10,000.00
2013

Downtown Eastside Neighbourhood House

Welcoming Spaces Project

The development of our Community Council in 2013 initiated a process of more active involvement in the programming and running of the NH. Residents clearly identified that one of the things that set the NH apart within the many services offered in the DTES, was the fact that the NH embraced and welcomed them in a variety of capacities: member, visitor, contributor, programmer. Because of this exciting feedback we are mindful that our success lies in the critical dimension of allowing those involved to shape and control their lives in meaningful ways. Our projects engage a “many hearths theory” or a multiple small groups approach to build community capacity. We also recognize that healing is a necessary part of development in our community. Our project involves piloting program development through 6 key projects: 1. Support group for Fathers 2. Healing and wellness days 3. Support group on Death and Loss 4. Social Nights--outreach– Music/arts groups 5. Re-connection with Nature: Field Trips, Walking Groups 6. Social justice Indian Residential Schools Survivors’ Support Group
$20,000.00
2014

Ecotrust Canada

Green Building with Clayoquot Sound First Nations

Green Building with Clayoquot Sound First Nations
$10,000.00
2011

Elizabeth Fry Society of Greater Vancouver

In the Best Interests of the Child

EFry seeks to raise the issue of homeless women and children through the lens of BC Legislation, and government responsibilities to see that homeless women and children are not disproportionately disadvantaged by their relative small numbers. The project seeks to rationalize resources to see that the most vulnerable - homeless children - are prioritized; and that homeless and at risk of homelessness women are provided equal opportunity to access supports as their male counterparts to find or remain housed. Doing so will reduce the generational legacy of homelessness in the lives of children as they grow, and provide women fairness, equality and opportunity.
$10,000.00
2017

Family Support Institute of B.C.

Personal Information Booklet

When information needs to be shared with team members (gov, health care teams, therapists,...) the end result is often inconsistent & clinical. Parents of children with disabilities find themselves constantly repeating their child’s story. Not only does this add undue stress to the family, it also further perpetuates a non person centered approach to their loved ones' care & they often get described with jargon & labels. This frustration is most apparent during the transition period of a youth’s life when they leave high school and enter adulthood - arguably, the most difficult time in a families' life. A Personal Information Booklet will address these challenges and build cohesive teams.
$10,000.00
2017

Fraser North - Community Volunteer Connections Society

Through Seniors Eyes - Building a Tri-Cities Seniors Planning Network

We will form the "Tri-Cities Seniors Network," the first seniors-led regional planning group for seniors in the Tri-Cities, involving seniors, seniors-serving organizations and businesses. The Network will explore the Tri-Cities "through seniors eyes" and develop collaborative solutions towards an Age-Friendly Tri-Cities. Our project will involve: * Developing an ongoing seniors planning network that ensures everyone's voice is heard, including developing a Terms of Reference and procedural guidelines *Organizing monthly meetings starting January 2013 on topics identified in our focus groups, to review existing service and initiatives, gaps, and develop initial action plans; topics identified include housing, social inclusion, transportation, access for socially isolated and immigrant seniors, lifelong learning, and coordinated services *Organizing seniors-led subcommittees to move forward on action plans *Conducting survey of seniors, particularly isolated seniors, and inventory of current services (depending on New Horizons funding).
$15,000.00
2012

Gabriola Commons Foundation

Gabriola Commons Community Kitchen

A 26 acre parcel in the ALR, the Gabriola Commons contains large well-built structures dating from its former existence as a thriving goat farm. These include a 1200 sq.ft. cheese factory now in the process of being transformed into a community kitchen to be recognized by Provincial Health authorities as achieving commercial standards. Several stages have been completed in this transformation, including the donation of the elements of an entire commercial kitchen (from the renovation of a local children's camp), replacement of the roof, and upgrading of the infrastructure to meet current codes and to serve the plan for a future kitchen able to permit several teams of chefs to function concurrently, as well as a refrigerated room, dry storage room and means for dehydrating island produce. A grant will lead into the final stages of the renovation, transforming the donated kitchen into fully functioning elements fitting within a facility able to satisfy a broad spectrum of community needs as detailed in Section 15 : Goals and Objectives.
$10,000.00
2012

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