Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

CCEDNet

Social Finance for Community Health and Well Being in British Columbia

Firstly we will compile a summary of existing research on impacts and models of place-based social finance in Canada and BC, and use that evidence to invite participation in and inform a "Learning Community" of practitioner and policy stakeholders in BC that will be convened over the lifetime of the project. Secondly we will support the implementation of two investment vehicles by the Vancouver Island Community Investment Cooperative that are currently in development. One is a Community Loan Fund in partnership with an Island based Credit Union that will invite contributions to a dedicated GIC the deposits in which will serve as collateral for loans to affordable rental housing, renewable energy, sustainable agriculture and fisheries, First Nations economic development, and other local owned ethical enterprises that create social benefits and community impacts. The other vehicle is a securities regulated investment fund that is RRSP eligible that will be implemented in partnership with a Securities Registered Investment Management Company to support the same types of community benefits. Thirdly we will evaluate both the social and economic impact of the funds and use that information to inform stakeholders and the Learning Community and assist with dialogue with the BC Government, the media, the finance sector, the Securities Commission, and municipalities on enabling public policy needed to help a place-based retail social financing to grow to scale in BC.
$225,000.00
2016

Christ Church Cathedral

The Maundy Cafe

This project aims to initiate a cultural shift in faith-based food programs from one that favors arms-length charity to a justice-based approach that combines a focus on food and social inclusion. This project will share learnings gained in the Cathedral’s transformation from emergency food provider to facilitator of food security committed to honoring the agency, creativity, dignity, intellect, and worth of all participants. Since faith communities play a significant role in the city’s food system, this project will have direct effects in progressing towards a more just, inclusive, and participatory food system.
$225,000.00
2017

City of Surrey

All Our Relations: Indigenous Children and Families Thriving in Surrey

45% of Indigenous children in Surrey live in poverty. We are compelled to act. Multiple systems interact in complex ways to create Indigenous child poverty. Band-aid solutions will never get at the deep systemic change required. We are proposing a Social Innovation Lab process, bringing all parts of the system together to gain insight into the roots of Indigenous child poverty in Surrey and identify a range of opportunities with the potential for high impact and uptake. We will test solutions, designing, implementing and evaluating together. We envision a ripple effect of change throughout the system, ultimately creating a city where all Indigenous children and families thrive.
$225,000.00
2017

Disability Alliance BC

The Right Fit Pilot Project: Facilitating Occupancy of Wheelchair Accessible Housing

DABC and our RFPP steering committee partners are seeking to change the system of wheelchair accessible housing provision in Metro Vancouver. Our desired outcome is the removal of the systemic barriers we have highlighted, so that wheelchair users can obtain the housing and supports they need through an accessible, timely and efficient process. The 3-year RFPP is designed to be a systemic intervention to test the development of fast track policies and procedures in MSDSI, the region's Health Authorities, linking and growing an enhanced registry of available accessible housing, and utilizing financial incentives for housing providers to maintain vacancies until wheelchair users can occupy their available accessible units. The RFPP will accommodate a constant caseload flow of 20 wheelchair users with the expectation that 60 or more will be served over the 3-year period. The RFPP aims to test the following system changes in Metro Vancouver: • Health authorities pre-screen and pre-approve home support and occupational therapy needs assessments; • MSDSI streamlines existing equipment allocation processes for eligible RFPP participants; • Housing providers funnel all accessible housing vacancies through the RFPP; • BC Housing makes funding available to housing providers to hold appropriate units until a RFPP participant can occupy a unit; • RFPP participants receive specialized case management and peer support to enable them to access units as quickly as possible.
$223,538.00
2016

Federation of Community Social Services of British Columbia

Community Based Social Services Innovation

Many BC communities face a patchwork of government services that are neither integrated nor holistic. These often fall short of what citizens need and lack community-specific requirements. Provincial governments struggle to bridge silos of regulation, funding, and administration. Our project offers an alternative to such centrally-designed and -managed services based on four successful community pilot programs that took place over the past 2 years. By empowering existing networks of community-based organizations, local governments, and First Nations, we are establishing new ways of organizing, coordinating, and delivering social services to even the smallest and most remote BC communities.
$225,000.00
2017

Fraser Basin Council Society

Rural Housing First

The project is to pilot a rural HF program, and to test the model on a small scale with a targeted group prior to scaling up the approach to meet the broader community needs. Ultimately, the entire process of housing and support will be redesigned as per the principles of HF: 1. Immediate access to permanent housing with no housing readiness requirements 2. Choice and self-determination 3. Recovery orientation 4. Individualized supports 5. Social and community integration We will redesign housing access processes and protocols to maximize the use of existing resources for a test group of clients. Current access for marginalized and vulnerable clients is based on individuals seeking housing services directly from each service. The proposed approach will coordinate access, and utilize existing outreach staff to identify clients who are need of housing and supports. We will work directly in partnership with landlords to ensure appropriate placement and ongoing support of the landlord-tenant relationship. The Housing and Homelessness Committee will serve as program advisors, redesign intake and case management protocols, and assist with client eligibility assessments. We will aim to complete integrated intake and assessment and housing for a maximum of 20 clients annually and provide ongoing supports as needed. The pilot will be evaluated from the perspective of clients, workers, community partners, landlords, and other relevant stakeholders.
$221,750.00
2016

Institute of Families for Child & Youth Mental Health

FamilySmart Network - Ready, Set, Collaborate

The World Health Organization developed a Framework for action that speaks to the necessity for interprofessional education in order to achieve collaborative practice & the Institute of Families believes this can be broadened by testing the inclusion of young people & families in collective learning that results in all being collaborative practice ready. We have tangible experiences, skills and examples that will be built on in our proposed test. For research expertise we will partner with the McCreary Centre & Stigma & Resilience Among Vulnerable Youth Centre (SARAVYC). Our project is to test & prove our belief that there is a pre-step before implementation of collaborative practice, which we refer to as being ‘Practice Ready’ & offer recommendations & practical practices for how to ensure professionals & youth & families are ready & able to collaborate successfully together. We will build on the current knowledge & experience that we have in engagement, empowerment, collaborating & connecting & invite all disciplines to come along-side young people & families to collectively learn from each other & prepare to be collaborative practice ready. We believe that professionals & lay people can & should be empowered & supported to be contributors & influencers. Everyone has distinct & specialized knowledge that is valuable & necessary to build communities where children, youth & families are safe, included, connected & supported. They are all interdisciplinary team members.
$225,000.00
2016

Network of Inner City Community Services Society

The Restoring Right Relationship Circle Training Project

Systemic racial discrimination against Indigenous peoples, resulting in extensive violence, harm, marginalization and inequity that causes institutionalized ill-health, trauma, poverty and violence for Indigenous peoples, will be countered with the growth of community-based Indigenous Restoraing Right Relationship skills and tools infrastructure amongst over 18 Indigenous-focused urban aboriginal agencies in the Vancouver Inner City. The pilot connects personal and interpersonal Indigenous restorative skills and behaviours with agency, policy and structural supports to develop a critical mass of healing, positive, restorative Indigenous and Indigenous-Ally relationships and community.
$225,000.00
2017

Pacific AIDS Network

Collective Collaboration : An Initiative to Build Capacity & Engagement to Impact BC’s HCV Landscape

People living with hepatitis C (HCV) in British Columbia want to contribute to the development of public health strategies. However, community-based organizations lack resources to ensure their involvement in leadership & decision-making. Establishing a Peer Leadership Development program to build capacity of People with Lived Experience of HCV will enable equitable participation. The foundation is the principle ‘Nothing About Us, Without Us’; it aims to articulate the rights of people living with HCV, impact policy changes & maximize the potential for reducing new infections.
$225,000.00
2017

Phoenix Transition Society

Harmony House: Holistic Perinatal Supportive Housing for Women Struggling with Substance Use

The proposed project aims to provide upstream prevention and early intervention supports to women struggling with substance use, especially Indigenous women, while they are pregnant and during the post-partum period using a decolonizing approach. The project will 1) provide safe and supportive housing in Prince George that will deliver a harm reduction, holistic model of care that has only previously been modeled in large urban centers and, 2) provide comprehensive services targeted at pregnant substance-using women adressing medical, mental, emotional and spiritual health. The program will assist women to gain life-skills, Elder mentorship, ready access to pre and postpartum education and support, assistance in moving into independent living with their infants, and break generational cycles of substance-use and child apprehension in communities. An important, and unique aspect of this project will be incorporation of Indigenous traditions and approaches to health with Aboriginal grandmothers at the center of our approach. Our project will influence systemic change towards health and well-being by targeting social determinants affecting vulnerable, pregnant women. More than solely housing, our approach aims to model culturally safe, wrap-around care for at risk women in a way that is highly scalabe to other rural and remote settings. Furthermore, this project follows a holistic and decolonizing approach to care - an emergent approach to providing care accross the north.
$225,000.00
2016

St. Paul's Foundation of Vancouver

Expanding Peer Involvement in Substance Use Care

Our project seeks to expand the involvement of the affected population – people who use drugs (PWUD) – within the substance use system of care. We see this as important and timely given the present overdose-related public health emergency. Our goal is to affect change by: • Reducing the stigma surrounding PWUD by involving them more extensively within the system of care; • Training peer health navigators to be present on site at treatment facilities and to serve as linkages to care, thereby offering further support to those seeking substance use treatment; • Providing valuable feedback to health care providers by soliciting the feedback of PWUD on presently available treatment options.
$223,998.00
2017

T'Sou-ke First Nation

T'Sou-ke Centre for Sustainability Housing Innovation

The T’Sou-ke Centre for Sustainability Housing Innovation project aims to address the housing crisis that exists within Canada’s First Nations communities. There are multiple systemic barriers that result in common issues such as overcrowding, mould contamination, poor construction and high energy costs. While there are many innovative technologies available, we believe that social innovation is needed prior to technical innovation. We are proposing to begin with community first. Our project will embody the traditional values and principles of the people. In this way, we’re bringing back traditional values in a modern context.
$225,000.00
2017

Tides Canada Initiatives Society

re-VALUE 2.0

The binning population - characterized by self-reliance - is often overlooked and harmed despite its obvious positive environmental impact. Binners, also called urban recyclers, are an essential part of the fabric of a well-functioning city. They are a resilient group that have actively contested ideas and perspectives on their place in urban areas. Binners’ Project fosters grassroots leadership that is by and for binners. Over time, the Binners Project’s emerging initiatives are fostering the potential of this community. We work with binners to shift systems that currently leave binners at the margins of society. Re-VALUE vs. 2 enables binners to create change from the bottom up.
$225,000.00
2017

Vancity Community Foundation

Code Red: Tackling B.C.'s Affordability Crisis

Squeezed by high costs for housing and child care, precarious work, and mounting debts, many younger British Columbians feel trapped and unable to reach their potential. Far too many believe that the problem must be them… That they are failures. Gen Squeeze’s work begins with a powerful socioeconomic analysis that shows young people they are not alone, and that the problem is a multi-faceted and generational “squeeze." Combining evidence-based policies, broad-based collaborations, and grassroots organizing, our Code Red project is focused on reining in sky-high housing costs in Metro Vancouver, Victoria and elsewhere, which are hitting young British Columbians particularly hard.
$225,000.00
2017

Community Impact Coop (CIC)

The CIC is a co-sharing training hub for unfunded advocacy groups of people in poverty lacking access to available resources due to poverty barriers and our charitable system. The CIC creates one entity that meets the needs of many excluded groups, redirecting the flow of established resources and building bridges across communities. The CIC Ethics of Engagement Project identifies barriers to inclusion of those with the lived experience of poverty in public-policy planning, partnering with government developing poverty reduction plans to create best practises and measurable outcomes that move people from ‘screaming’ to be heard on the outside of decision-making tables to leading the process.
$225,000.00
2017

Regional Poverty Reduction Hubs: Connecting Communities for Upstream Action

There's nothing like meeting face to face and building relationships in local communities. We learned that when we travelled around the province hosting community workshops and we want to build on that to become a truly engaged provincial network. We have developed a very productive coalition of groups working on anti-poverty initiatives within Metro Vancouver and we plan to take the best practices of this work and test them in 2 other regions in BC (Okanagan and North). These regions have been selected because of their differences in public and political support for this systemic change so they will provide a productive comparison for growing the network in the future. Our work is focused on three streams: building capacity of our member organizations, including increased opportunities for collaboration (with the aim of impacting the resource flows of a social system, how knowledge and people can interact in different ways); increasing public awareness of these issues and the need for systemic change (to influence beliefs and routines); and political advocacy (to change the authority flows of a social system). We plan to take these into other regions by setting up 2 Regional Poverty Reduction Hubs with provision of regional coordinators and expansion of our programs, including a Leadership Development program, regional Speaker Series events, coordinating action research with local partners, and producing outreach material (video, online, print) that resonates locally.
$225,000.00
2016

Vancouver Native Health Society

Innovating a Primary Healthcare System to Reduce Structural Violence

The social innovation of this project is the inclusion of Indigenous Elders in genuine partnership with primary care providers in urban clinic environments. Although this sounds simple, genuine partnership with Indigenous Elders necessitates tackling the systemic challenges of discordant values and epistemologies, that underlie the perpetuation of structural violence and associated lack of infrastructure and resources for Indigenous health services. Although this process has already begun at VNHS, there are still significant system challenges that need to be addressed. VNHS's attempt to address systemic challenges will include creating more opportunities for Elders, primary care providers, community members, and administrators to engage in meaningful dialogue. The dialogue will focus on establishing a clear set of shared health system values and identifying and addressing causes of structural violence. Resources can then be used to draft a shared clinic mission statement, and collaboratively seek solutions to systemic barriers such as inadequate space for ceremony within the clinic. We also aim to foster increased opportunities for meaningful participation by patients, community members, clinic staff and physicians in Elder-led ceremonies, which we have identified as a key cultural process with strong potential to diminish power inequalities.
$224,040.00
2016

Williams Lake Indian Band

Circle of Strength Community Safety Project

Residential school and generational trauma have impacted First Nations communities and families in a range of different ways. When a family crisis occurs, or when a family is struggling, our usual approach has been to remove children from their families to protect them from further harm. This traumatizes both the children and their families. This project is about finding a different way. We want to work together with all the services in our community identify and reach out to families who are struggling sooner, provide support and resources to help them resolve the challenges they face, keep their children and the community safe, and support health family development.
$224,720.00
2017