Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

Arts in Action Society

Groundswell: Grassroots Economic Alternatives

Our proposal comes in two parts: first a training institute where young people (up to age 35) can come together for a year's intensive program to imagine, design and build new enterprises including cooperatives, collectives, non-profits, arts and artisanal enterprises, self-employment scenarios and other grassroots configurations: all explicitly contributing to a community economic fabric of reciprocity. Each program will run for ten months: 4 months of intensive work, a month of strategizing and proposal planning, then 5 months of supported project development. Participants will develop the comprehensive skills - individually and collectively needed to run their own enterprises. The second piece is that we will link graduates and their new initiatives into a network of mutual aid and support. Each graduating participant and enterprise will be a member of the Groundswell Co-op relying on and supporting one another, and being supported by the collective institutional, organizational and financial resources. Ongoing reciprocity and interconnectedness is the key to our proposal.
$70,000.00
2012

Association of Neighbourhood Houses of British Columbia

Frog Hollow Neighbourhood House Pathways Out of Poverty

Pathways Out of Poverty pilots a strength-based collaborative project to build capacity among immigrant women & their families to: -Understand possible pathways out of poverty & for achieving a living wage. -Navigate training/employment services & related community supports -Develop problem solving, networking & assertiveness skills needed to address personal & systemic barriers. -Develop leadership & speaking skills to facilitate participation in public dialogue to address systemic barriers & key employment issues. The need for programming to support local immigrant women to move into paid employment was identified in 2006 and 2009-10 through the Frog Hollow Community Connections Project. In 2009, Jennifer Chun, Department of Sociology at UBC, broadened this exploration by facilitating 4 city wide neighbourhood cafes to identify the issues prevent women obtaining a "living wage" or work in their field of expertise. Pathways Out of Poverty is a collaboration between organizational stakeholders & immigrant women to positively address issues of personal & systemic exclusion.
$76,302.00
2012

Collingwood Neighbourhood House Society

Expanding Curriculum for Change to Lower Mainland Municipalities

In 2011-2013, Living in Community (LIC) developed and delivered a Vancouver Foundation funded sex work sensitivity curriculum that addressed the gap in awareness, knowledge and skills for front-line service providers in Vancouver - service providers who do not always know how to effectively respond to the unique needs of sex workers nor address the impacts of sex work and sexual exploitation on neighborhoods. In this project, LIC will build on the successful public education initiative we have created. We will expand the training to key stakeholders in neighboring municipalities that are ready for action and education. Training will be provided to municipal government, law enforcement, business, health and social service providers and residents. We hope that education on sex work and sexual exploitation issues will also encourage neighbouring municipalities to adopt Living in Community’s model of community development strategies in regard to issues related to sex work and sexual exploitation as recommended by the Missing Women’s Commission of Inquiry Report.
$75,000.00
2014

Family Services of the North Shore

Connecting a Caring Community - Supporting Quality of Life

This innovative new community based volunteer project was identified and is being developed in partnership with 30+ local residents, volunteers and community partners in order to improve the quality of life for those who are marginalized and isolated as a result of being disabled, nearing end-of-life, or bereaved. It will reduce isolation, advance the health and well-being of individual adults and families, mitigate the effects of poverty, and improve access and linkages to systems of care and support. The volunteers will provide weekly in-home visits, bereavement support groups, telephone companionship calls, walking groups, therapeutic healing modalities (e.g. foot rubs, therapeutic touch, guided meditation) and social activities in collaboration with the needs and wishes of the participants. Volunteers will also gather data through case studies and surveys over 1-3 years to support and inform the development of public policy solutions, in collaboration with our community partners, to create long term systemic change within our community.
$75,000.00
2013

Hope in Shadows Inc.

Developing the Hope in Shadows and Megaphone Vendor Program

This project will substantially develop the Hope in Shadows and Megaphone vendor program by expanding its reach while filling gaps in the support and training that vendors receive. The project's objectives - to increase vendors' sales and the number of active Megaphone vendors, to help vendors build their skills and to provide them with meaningful social connections - were developed after consulting with vendors and staff from successful North American street newspapers. This project will achieve its objectives through hiring a full-time vendor coordinator who will organize training workshops, team-building events and meetings for vendors. In addition to these group activities the coordinator will support and encourage vendors through field visits and individual check-ins. The co-ordinator will also do outreach to make vendor opportunities accessible to homeless and low-income people while building support for vendors among residential and business communities. This project will allow for the continuation of a Vendor Advisory Board, which had a successful three month trail in 2011.
$80,000.00
2012

Lu'ma Native Housing Society

Traditional Healers/Elders Project at Lu'ma Medical Centre

The disparity in health for Indigenous people is no longer acceptable. In order to improve health outcomes we must reconcile how health care is delivered to Indigenous peoples. who have experienced a much higher amount of consistent trauma over long periods of time from systemic discrimination and removal of children. Traditional Healers/Elders can engage Indigenous patients to actively participate in healing their body, spirit, mind and emotions to restore their health. Culturally integrated health care is innovative because the teachings and practices of ancient traditional healing is applied to empower individuals & families to solve health challenges today.
$74,983.00
2017

Planned Lifetime Advocacy Network

Network for Belonging

The Network for Belonging Initiative aims to extend PLAN's Personal Support Network Model in the broader community, in particular we will work with partners from the Brain Injury, Drug and Alcohol addictions, and mental health communities. The common theme of isolation is deeply felt in these communities and through initial explorations our partners believe that the Personal Support Network model, when tailored to address their unique needs will be an important strategy to increase belonging and decrease the devastation of living life in isolation. The Initiative is not just about sharing the concept of personal support networks; it is about developing financially sustainable models to support their application. Building sustainable PSN models across our partner organizations will yield rich learning which we will capture and share. This learning will both guide future PSN model replication as well as inform the public policy aspects of the Network for Belonging Initiative.
$75,000.00
2012

Proton Foundation

Honour:Health to Hand - "Totems in the Forest"

Honor:Health to Hand is OMVC’s commitment & response to community requests to aid with healthy development, diversify the economic base for homes & community & offer a culturally appropriate exemplary positive initiative to transfer skills & knowledge from Elder to youth, as it is well recognized that all on-reserve aboriginal youth are at risk & the oral traditions are at risk of dying. We will engage 8 Haida youth, including male & females & those with disabilities, with 3 Master Carvers in a 27-week cultural training/skill development initiative. It includes certification courses, mentorship, health & entrepreneurial aspects; offered at NorthWest Community College Campus in Masset, the high school trade shop, OMVC’s education/ eco-tourism facility-Hiellen Longhouse Village, the carving studio in Old Massett, & Emily Carr UofAD. Endorsed & mentored by Master Carvers Chief 7idansuu Jim Hart & Christian White youth will earn certificates, learn Haida art design/carving/business skills & assist in 2 projects; replication of the historic heritage Hliialang’inagee gyaa’ang Totem that stood in Hiellen Village 150+ years ago & develop a “Welcome Sign” with two small 8’ totems for the entrance to Hiellen Longhouse Village, approved by the Haida Repatriation Society. This will be exemplary, inclusive & engaging. At completion both will be erected during a high Haida celebration during Canada 150. Youth & elders will participate. Healing & reconciliation for all will be profound.
$75,000.00
2016

The Arthritis Society, BC & Yukon

Electronic Arthritis Triage Strategy (EATS)

The EATS Program serves to reduce barriers to treatment for people with arthritis. It will ensure appropriate treatment for their properly diagnosed arthritis by the appropriate healthcare professionals (HCPS), in a timely way that will help to reduce disease progression and disability. Earlier treatment will reduce the need for more invasive treatments including medications with higher side-effects and the need for surgery. This will be achieved through the development and implementation of an online triage tool that uses standardized examination questions where the responses are processed through a decision support system (based on BC Rheumatology guidelines) to determine the best route to treating their arthritis. EATS will generate a report summary of the patient responses combined with other key patient data from the healthcare system. This will be accessible by the primary care provider, rheumatologist and/or allied HCP. The result is the expedited referrals of high priority patients to rheumatologists, which improves specialist access, increases positive health outcomes for patients due to early disease intervention and reduces the need for costly medications. This will generate significant cost savings for the MoH. Our partnerships with healthcare professional bodies (rheumatologists, GPs & allied HCPs) will assist in the adoption and utilization of EATS.
$75,000.00
2017

Tides Canada Initiatives Society

Reconciliation Canada - New Way Forward

Reconciliation Canada is engaging Canadians in reconciliation through experiential transformative change processes delivered by the following: Reconciliation Dialogue Workshops & Action Plans Targeted at community and organizational leaders, these workshops provide the opportunity for participants to engage in meaningful dialogue, build relationships and develop reconciliation action plans. Workshops will include a youth specific stream. Leadership Training & Core Competencies Assessment - Targeted to existing and emerging youth, community and organization leaders to develop reconciliation values-based leadership skills. In conjunction Reconciliation Canada will assist organizations with assessments of core reconciliation competencies and development of roadmaps to guide reconciliation initiatives. Sustainable Economic Reconciliation Dialogue & Action Plans - Workshops focused on economic reconciliation bring together stakeholders for creative dialogue to build meaningful partnerships and the co-development of Sustainable Economic Reconciliation Action Plans.
$70,000.00
2014

Vancity Community Foundation

Code Red: Testing a “CARP” approach to B.C.’s affordability crisis

Political systems respond to those who organize and show up – at the ballot box and in between elections. While aging Canadians have long had umbrella advocacy groups persistently advancing their interests, younger Canadians have not. Our "CARP for younger Canada" approach tests what we can achieve by filling that gap. We'll influence systemic change via 4 key levers: How we act - we'll engage younger British Columbians in non-partisan, evidence-based political organizing. Our public Code Red campaign will be a catalyst. Beliefs – along the way we'll tackle the belief that younger people are entitled, lazy, etc. (i.e. individually at-fault) and replace it with a belief that society is holding us back by failing to invest in us; via earned media, extensive community presentations, and our website, social and email channels. Resource flows – we'll channel the above to spur increased public investment in younger Canadians, guided by an annual analysis. Laws & policies – we'll mobilize support for policies that ease the squeeze, e.g. adequately funded universal child care, extended parental leave, housing market reform and investments. * * Rather than inflexibly committing to a SINGLE policy, we seek opportunities to advance whatever evidence-based policies have in-the-moment traction WITHIN our realm of research & expertise on the social determinants of health. This project has a clear emphasis on housing and family/affordability policy.
$75,000.00
2016