Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

Abbotsford Community Services

CREATE COMMUNITY and CASH through CRAFTS

• This project originated from: o Life Chats (LC)is a youth led peer support group and was developed through the HECC initiative to engage and connect youth with lived care experience (WLCE) to each other in Abbotsford. o Learned through LC that youth: • Were still not aware of the supports that they could access after 19 and wanted one on one information from other youth. • Benefitted from having something to do with their hands while connecting with each other. Crafts provided this outlet. • Wanted to make crafts that were marketable. HECC youth developed the following idea and were involved in all aspects of the proposal, including development of the budget. This new proposed project provides 1. Continuation and expansion of Life Chats including connection to resources 2. Research opportunity on social craft enterprise 3. Development of resource for youth leaders to start LC in their own area. a. Purpose: i. To build community within youth WLCE and develop young leaders. ii. To provide youth WLCE with helpful resources in their community. iii. To provide an opportunity to participate in building skills in craft making. iv. To learn about craft making as a social enterprise v. To facilitate youth connection to craft markets to feature their art vi. To share with other youth leaders in other communities how to create a Life Chats group.
$10,000.00
2017

Community Connections

In place of service delivery to youth who have aged out of care, we will increase readiness in the community to support these youth. A part-time staff will focus on: • Youth friendly landlord engagement • Youth friendly employer engagement • Community connections for youth We will build on existing landlord relationships by: • Establishing a youth friendly landlords group • Hosting regular landlord events • Promoting a tenant readiness program to landlords (i.e. ready to rent, existing Autumn House curriculum) We will partner with previously identified youth friendly employers to develop: • Employer & youth developed workshops, delivered at companies employing a high number of young people on: expectations for employees and a “how to communicate with young people” • Education & awareness for employers of challenges/barriers faced by young people • Completion of curriculum and workshops, with employer participation, for youth, to increase employment readiness We will support youth in building natural supports in the community through: • Creating a regular opportunity for young people & those who want to support them to spend time together • Developing a sponsor network: Former youth in care who are doing well, are interested in being “sponsors” for struggling youth. We will recruit more “sponsors” through our relationships with youth and the MCFD Youth Team • Using settings that youth are already comfortable with i.e. Abbotsford Youth Health Centre
$49,437.00
2015

Bridges to Adulthood

When youth in care turn 19, they lose the support they have been receiving from the Ministry and from other youth service providers. Due to the intensity of our caseloads, our ability to offer follow up services after youth age out of government care is limited. During two pilot projects, we were able to continue services beyond youths' 19th birthdays; some of the outcomes of these pilot projects include youth getting and staying out of drug and sex trades, reduced street-entrenchment and increased natural support for youth. Such outcomes inspired us to create the Bridges to Adulthood project. In this project, we will offer support to young adults (ages 18.5 to 20) through our adulthood preparation groups, young adults support groups and individualized outreach services. Our aim is to increase natural supports for these young adults by involving former foster parents, recruiting mentors, building a peer support network and possibly involve families. We also intend to increase youth and community engagement through focus groups and in advocating for relevant policy changes.
$165,000.00
2013

Access to Media Education Society

Mentor Me at Indigenous Fashion Week (MMIFW)

Mentor Me (MM) at Indigenous Fashion Week (IFW) (MMIFW) will engage urban Aboriginal youth in care in traininga nd mentorships to empower their identities, community relationships, and employability skill development, through IFW's celebration of Indigenous pride in the creative regalia arts that story Indigenous identity in collective cultural meaning. IFW will gather 30 Indigenous-Canadian designers and artists for the first national showcase of these international clothing artists. The ongiong Mentor Me weekly group engages 15 young Indigenous women transitioning from care. MMIFW will recruit, engage, train and mentor 30 Indigenous youth-in-care in 4 urban and 2 rural training workshops, mentorships and employment. Indigenous youth, all systemically affected by the foster system will develop cultural identity, relationship, and employment skills. They be mentored with the IFW team and cultural advisory networks, and will be employed as presenters and producers at the event. Workshops after the event will gather the knowledge of these engaged youth to evaluate and design an enhanced Mentor Me program. MMIFW will create strong relationships between young people and their community members. Their experiential research into effective mentorship and skills development, focused through the creative art of IFW, will build community knowledge of how to support youth transitioning from care, activated in the MMIFW network.
$24,000.00
2016

Access to Music Foundation

Death in a Dumpster: The impact arts engagement has on youth aging out of care

This project is a collaborative venture between youth, our organization, and professional mentors in association with Directions Youth Services that supports our theory of change that sustained arts programming is a viable engagement method that has lasting benefits for street involved youth and youth aging out of care. Research suggests that the arts provide a positive entry point for youth to develop personal agency and is useful in redirecting inappropriate behaviors and ameliorating depression and suicidal ideations. We have evidence of this through our 2 year relationship with DYS where significant numbers of youth expressed a strong need to access creative activities that help them self-assess personal benchmarks. This project responds to that need and also provides a vehicle whereby youth can develop social, leadership, and applied job related skills as they transition into independence. It is critical that youth do not incur any economic burden while participating in this project and that their efforts are recognized through monetary expression. Long range plans are to amass qualitative, quantitative and narrative data; the last of which is documented on film. Research, anticipated outcomes, film documentation and methodology will be shared with other agencies working with these youth populations to encourage a multi-nested systems change to increase funding for arts and media programs and training, program implementation, heightened issues awareness, and advocacy.
$9,875.00
2015

Adoptive Families Association of British Columbia

Permanency Project for At Risk Youth

For the first time, AFABC would like to host a 3-day family finding bootcamp for homeless youth, and former youth in care experiencing loneliness. Every child has a family/network, and they can be found. Family Finding Boot Camps are a three day immersion for up to 50 youth and former youth in care learning the philosophy, framework and skills of Family Finding practice. Participants work in small and medium sized teams, actually practicing Family Finding for youth currently homeless, at risk of becoming homeless, or are experiencing loneliness. We would invite lead practitioner Kevin Campbell to host. In his previous bootcamps across the USA participants have successfully completed the Discovery and initial Engagement steps of Family Finding. The goal for the teams by day three of the training is to have found relatives and other connections, identified family members with functional strengths, engaged two lead family members, and invited found adults to a Preparation and Planning Meeting to be held following the bootcamp. Participants leave the immersion experience having learned and practiced the skills of Family Finding, developed a sense of confidence in their use of the skills, and feel confident in their ability to develop a personal support network. Our focus at AFABC includes following up with youth to ensure they are supported as they connect. Partnership opportunities: Broadway Youth Centre, Covenant House, Aunt Leah's, Federation of BC Youth in Care.
$25,000.00
2016

Speak-Out Youth Group

The Speak-Out Youth Group fills a vital gap in existing resources by supporting and encouraging youth in-and-from government care to continue exploring permanency options. This youth led program engages and empowers youth to share their stories, build networks, create resources, gain valuable life skills, advocate for systematic change, and raise awareness about the need for permanent families for all children in government care. The Speak-Out Youth Group is an established program that provides peer support and a vital sense of permanence to its members while facilitating youth participation in community outreach.
$15,000.00
2014

Speak-Out Youth Group

In 2009 AFABC partnered with MCFD to plan and implement a project aimed at increasing the number of permanency plans for youth in government care. The Speak-Out Youth Group evolved from this pilot in recognition of the value that both individual and collective perspectives and experiences played in the successful delivery of the initiative. 15 youth participants expressed an adamant interest in remaining connected to AFABC and the project in order to continue exploring options for permanence and develop more resource materials about teen adoption. The Speak-Out Youth Group is an empowering youth led program with 25 active members and consists of youth-in-care, former youth-in-care, and adoptees aged 13-24 from BC’s Vancouver Coastal and Fraser Regions. By focusing on youth engagement, this program gives a powerful voice to those who have experiences with the foster care system. Monthly meetings also give youth an opportunity to develop transferable life skills by working with career professionals, child and youth care representatives, and clinical counselors.
$20,000.00
2013

Alouette Home Start Society

Route 29: The Road Home

Imagine facing the transition from adolescence to adulthood while, at the same time, struggling just to survive because you don’t have a home. The 2011 Homeless Count found 29 homeless youth in Maple Ridge. Over three years, this project will find and improve youth access to housing and build connections and continuing relationships with youth aged 17 to 24. Each youth will be supported in their own unique journey to maturity and to becoming healthy, happy people, with a secure home and the capacity to keep it.
$260,000.00
2011

Art Starts in Schools Society

YoungStarters

YoungStarters is a free arts mentorship program provided by ArtStarts that invites teens to take the lead in arts based community projects. The program is designed for creative-minded, ambitious young people. For five weeks in Summer 2015, the group will meet every Sunday at the ArtStarts LAB. Partnered with mentors who range from professional artists, arts administrators and community organizers, young people participate in workshops as they individually develop their own art project ideas. Each individual project will be given a $500 budget and space to explore ideas through a process based, arts integrated approach. By providing young people with the right tools, support and knowledge, YoungStarters activates young people's creativities while providing them with lasting, relevant skills and experiences. By focusing on community based projects, YoungStarters aims to engage the community through youth-led collaborations exploring diverse art forms.
$15,000.00
2014

Arts in Action Society

19th Birthday Party Exhibition Tour

To plan, facilate, and curate an exhibition tour of the 19th Birthday Party, an interactive media installation that serves as a central provocative agent for public dialogue and education surrounding issues relating to youth in government care. The tour will work with between 4 to 7 host organizations in municipalities across the lower mainland, including: Aunt Leah’s Society in New Westminster, Lu’Ma Native Housing Society in East Vancouver, and community organizations and partners in Surrey, Burnaby, North Vancouver and Abbotsford. Co-directors of Housing Matters Media Porject will work closely with partnering host organizations in each municipality to create an art engagement and/or social event that accompanies the installation to further encourage community dialogue.
$52,385.00
2016

We Are Everywhere

We Are Everywhere is a community engaged art project led by artists Corin Browne and Patti Fraser, advocate and project coordinator Violet Rose Pharoah and communication professionals to mentor a small group of youth with lived foster care experience to collaboratively create a high-quality book, featuring interviews, stories and photographs of community members from across the lower mainland who are former youth in care, exploring their daily lives and sharing what has helped them survive and thrive. The project will include a post-project evaluation process with research and planing for longterm distribution of the book, including the potential social enterprise development with youth participants The mainstream narrative associated with foster care is a negative, recycled story that speaks about the issue without the actual voice of those with lived experience. The foster care population carries the social stigma of “failure” and even those closest to them usually have very little expectations for their futures. While crucial to acknowledge the realities that individuals from foster care face, many are carving out lives defined by their own personal definition of success; quietly creating new narratives that defy the preconceived notions about life after foster care. These stories deserve the opportunity to be shared and have the potential to inspire youth aging out of the system, as well as shift the current perpetuated narrative.
$50,000.00
2016

Enterprising Youth

Through this project we will utilize a small cohort of youth to demonstrate their potential for independence and the existing capacity within youth exiting care to participate in, and eventually manage, visible mainstream spaces in Vancouver - spaces such as business, alternate and post secondary education, and community discussions of social issues affecting youth directly. This will be done by recruiting 4-6 young people between 17-24 who have experienced government care to participate in the Groundswell Business Alternatives Program. Through the program, youth will develop a project (ex. a socially-conscious small business, branded product, a non-profit or campaign) which at the end of the program will be presented as a Gala comprised of potential funders, community advocates, alumni and financial mentors. After the Gala, youth will use the mentors, alumni, and staff to carry out their project in the chosen community. The youth will be supported to find a project that will succeed, and will be supported by a wraparound community committed to their success in their chosen venture.
$30,000.00
2014

The Housing Matters Media Project - The Renovation working title

The Arts in Action Society in partnership with the Housing Matters Media Project is seeking funds in order to further our ongoing work in building and sustaining informed networks of youth and concerned adults who are involved in seeking solutions to issues relating to affordable housing for youth, particularly for former youth in care. This community engaged media art project will increase the community's ability to voice its own ideas and seek its own solutions in ways in which the public parent can support youth to successfully transition out of care into the community. This project will continue to educate members of the community on the particular issues youth in care face as they transition to adulthood. This project will create opportunities for mentorship, learning, and employment for participating youth. And it intends to create new knowledge to aid in ways in which adults can involve themselves in the role of the public parent.
$50,000.00
2014

Youth Care Media Project (WORKING TITLE ONLY)

This digital storytelling project will work with a group of youth and youth technical mentors to create a series of digital stories. The themes of this project will centre around the participant's response to the lack of support for youth in government care as they reach adulthood. This project will mentor the youth in community engaged digital video production skills with the intention of inviting the participants to create stories that relate to the project's inquiry. This work is intended to challenge and question the current mainstream narrative on homelessness and youth. This project seeks to create venues and opportunities for youth from diverse backgrounds to question, respond, and provoke a greater public awareness of the issues facing youth and housing issues. Community video is created through collaboration with skilled artists and and sees production values as an inherent part of the process. The project will create these digital stories in a series of workshops. We are committed to a collaborative, respectful, and democratic working environment
$20,000.00
2013

Association of Neighbourhood Houses of British Columbia

Frames Film Project: Increasing Community Connectedness for Youth in Care

The Frames Film Project provides training, support, and voice to multi-barriered youth ages 16-24. Each twelve week intake includes 15-20 youth participants, 3 Frame graduates/mentors, and 2 part-time staff. Youth meet one evening each week to provide peer support; receive life and employment skills training; and collaborate to conceptualize, film and edit stories for community change. Previous Frames' films addressed community issues of substance misuse, mental health, multi-culturalism, and crime prevention. Intake 9 films will focus on youth approaches to increase community connectedness for youth in care. All Frames films are shared at quarterly community screening events. Over the past two and a half years, our approach has proven to help youth with significant barriers develop a wide range of skills and take steps towards employment and community attachment. Frames is recognized by the Globe and Mail, CBC, partner organizations, and film industry professionals as a leading youth program.
$25,000.00
2014

Aunt Leah's Independent Lifeskills Society

Foster Youth Food Guide

Foster youths face a multitude of challenges after aging out of government care, from housing to education and employment. However, one of the most immediate and pressing obstacles youth face after losing support, is where they’re going to find their next meal. Due to a lack of support, we know that over half of BC foster youth will become dependent on income assistance (MCFD, 2015). This means that for the majority of foster youth, their weekly food allowance is approximately $18 after factoring in living expenses (Raise the Rates, 2015). As a result, many foster youths need to find alternative sources of free food or confront days of hunger. The good news is that there are many organizations, like Aunt Leah's Place, that offer free food and community supports in Metro Vancouver. Using youth experience and knowledge of these organizations, the Foster Youth Food Guide will create an online food resource that helps young people locate organizations that are transit accessible, safe and promote food security. The guide will be built using Google Maps’ API and include clear directions, detailed descriptions, and pictures or videos of each space. To gather this data, youth researchers will travel and review each location. We believe this project falls directly within Fostering Change’s small grants funding approach, as it is a youth-led project that fills a gap with actionable knowledge and builds relationships between foster youth and their communities in Metro Vancouver.
$4,480.00
2017

Community Sourcing: Crowd-Sourcing New Allies & Resources for Youth In-And-From Care

‘Community Sourcing’ creates multiple legacy projects to build upon and carry forward the work of the Fostering Change initiative through a bi-annual youth-led and youth-organized “crowdsourcing” dinner. Dinner attendees pay an entrance fee to get dinner and a vote. Attendees hear presentations on community-building projects from youth in-and-from foster care. At the event, attendees eat, talk, share resources, and vote on the project they think benefits the community and youth-from-care the most. At the end of the night, ballots are counted and the winning presenter goes home with all money raised (around $2,000) to carry out the project. Thus, youth in-and-from foster care raise money, build community support and get connections to local resources that can help carry out their project. This Community Sourcing dinner occurs twice a year with opportunities for presenters to receive speaking & engagement training in preparation for their presentation. Two youth in-and-from foster care are hired to run the project, including organizing and building capacity of presenters, promotion of the bi-annual dinners, plus sourcing sponsors and supporters. The premise of this project is largely borrowed from SOUP, a model of community project ‘dinner’ crowd-sourcing that has proven successful around the world. People want to engage and participate in this type of community-building activity and this project opens up this important opportunity to youth in-and-from foster care.
$37,500.00
2017

Thresholds Program: Interrupting the Intergenerational Cycle of Foster Care

Thresholds Program provides supported housing for pregnant and parenting moms who, due to homelessness, are at risk of losing child custody. Moms live in a warm, home-like and supported environment during their stay, moving to supported independent housing when ready. Priority is given to moms who have a history of being in foster care. Youth from care are at heightened risk of early pregnancy and loss of child custody to the child welfare system. In BC, no collated record is kept on the number of youth-in-care who experience pregnancy. The best data on this issue comes from McCreary's work, ‘Fostering Potential’ (2008). The "report is based on the responses of almost 1,000 young people in Grades 7 through 12 who had been in care" and finds "among [foster] youth who ever had sex, 19% reported having been pregnant or caused a pregnancy, with a further 6% not sure if they had". Aunt Leah's 28-year history of working with young people transitioning from foster care corroborates this data; for example, of the 164 former foster youth that Aunt Leah’s worked with last year, 28 (17%) have dependents of their own – representing an additional 39 babies and children that receive Aunt Leah’s support. Thresholds works preventatively at the ‘entry’ point of the foster care system by giving pregnant & parenting young women from care the skills and resources they need in order to become successful parents, thus barring a new generation of children from entry into foster care.
$67,500.00
2016

The Friendly Landlord Network

Aunt Leah’s is asking Vancouver Foundation to fund the next 3 years of The Friendly Landlord Network (FLN). FLN is a Metro Vancouver-wide network of landlords who are interested in renting to youth from care, plus a network of youth-serving organizations who are interested in giving supports to youth from care in order to help them attain/maintain their tenure. The main connection point is to be a searchable online database resource (friendlylandlordnetwork.com) for Metro Vancouver youth from care, foster families, social workers and youth-serving organizations. FLN creates a platform for landlords to exclusively direct their rental properties to youth from care in need of quality housing. Twenty-five youth-serving organizations from across the Lower Mainland have committed to supporting their youth who use FLN. This coalition of youth-serving organizations works to mitigates landlord concerns regarding issues such as lack of references, immaturity, low-incomes, or credit history. These organizations are geographically dispersed across the Lower Mainland and sign-up to the network on the condition that they'll give basic outreach and support to the their youth. In addition, this project will partially fund the work of Link Support Workers who help maintain the tenure of Aunt Leah's youth using FLN through regular youth check-ins, landlord relationship-building, procurement of stable income sources for rent payments, and long-term goal-setting/planning with youth.
$205,000.00
2015

The Canoe Project

The Canoe Project will be designed, organized and implemented by Aunt Leah’s Youth Advisory Committee (YAC). The Cano Project has two core aims: First, we (YAC) will participate again in a week-long canoe journey with the stated goal of "recognizing the past by Pulling Together to enhance understanding between Public Service Agencies and Aboriginal Peoples by canoeing the traditional highway, strengthening our future relations". Our journey last year, from Harrison Lake, down the Fraser, to Semiahmoo was a powerful journey which reconnected us culturally on the water, together eating food and listening to Elders around the fire. It also enhanced our understanding of ourselves as youth from care and our connection to public service agencies. We rowed for 5 days with MCFD Social Workers, RCMP Officers, Chiefs and Elders. We will row again in Summer 2016, but this time we will bring a new cohort of young people with us, expanding the representation of youth from care on the 2016 Pulling Together Canoe Journey (www.pullingtogether.ca) by a factor of two! Second, we plan to present the story publicly of who we are as youth from care, using the Canoe Journey as a metaphor. We hope to work on a small presentation that we can take on the road as a workshop in settings such as schools, service clubs, service agencies and conferences. We will make a small video of our proposed presentation and deliver it at TEDx Kids in hopes of getting our message out to a larger audience.
$10,000.00
2015

The Friendly Landlord Network

The Friendly Network will create and systematrize a private sector network of resources specific to youth transitioning from care to adulthood. In addition this project will create a communication tool to enhance the increased inter-organizational coordination desired through the Fostering Change project.
$41,322.00
2014

The Link

Aunt Leah's provides semi-independent housing for sixteen foster teens, 15-18 years of age, who are preparing to live on their own when they 'age out' of care at 19. We provide a basement suite with a supportive landlord as well as pre-employment and life skills training. Despite this intervention, many of these children are not fully prepared to make a full and successful transition to adulthood. Many go through a series of tenancy breakdowns and couch surfing ending with a large percent on income assistance or experiencing homeless. In 2010, Vancouver Foundation began 3 years of funding for a second-stage program called The Link which provides transition workers, food & housing, and education opportunities for 30 youth (annually). Today, the demand for this program has risen with over 80 former foster kids served per annum. The Link mimics the care that parented youth receive well into early adulthood; over half of 20-something Canadians choose to live at home. Over 40% of BC foster youth experience homeless after age 19; yet 90% of Link youth maintain safe affordable housing.
$100,000.00
2013

The Link

Aunt Leah's provides semi-independent housing for sixteen foster teens, 15-18 years of age, who are preparing to live on their own when they 'age out' of care at 19. We provide a basement suite with a supportive landlord as well as pre-employment and life skills training. Despite this intervention, many of these children are not fully prepared to make a full and successful transition to adulthood. Many go through a series of tenancy breakdowns and couch surfing ending with a large percent on income assistance or experiencing homeless. In 2010, Vancouver Foundation began 3 years of funding for a second-stage program called The Link which provides transition workers, food & housing, and education opportunities for 30 youth (annually). Today, the demand for this program has risen with over 80 former foster kids served per annum. The Link mimics the care that parented youth receive well into early adulthood; over half of 20-something Canadians choose to live at home. Over 40% of BC foster youth experience homeless after age 19; yet 90% of Link youth maintain safe affordable housing.
$100,000.00
2013

British Columbia's Children's Hospital Foundation

Health Transitions for Youth in Care

Given the acute and lifelong health vulnerability for youth in care, it is vital to have the health sector as a leader in promoting health and wellness in this population. This project will improve connections between the health sector and youth transitioning out of care through participatory research with youth that will guide development of an interactive workshop, transition toolkit and health navigator program. The proposed project will use a grassroots, strength based, youth driven framework to improve long term health and wellness outcomes and reduce negative health outcomes. There are 2 phases. Phase 1 will contribute empirical data from youth transitioning from care.. Youth will participate in an interactive workshop followed by qualitative interviews over the course of 6 months as youth turn 19, to gather data about the health related barriers and facilitators available to youth. Results will inform further intervention development and dissemination in phase 2. Developed with youth and stakeholder input and input from phase 1, phase 2 involves information technology, so that youth all over BC will have access. It will also pilot a peer navigation program of youth paired with a health student (medical students, nursing students, etc) to assist with health related access to care. Health navigators will build health and wellness life skills including but not limited to access to family physician, blood work, prescriptions, and/or gym access.
$15,000.00
2015

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