Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

Access to Media Education Society

Mentor Me at Indigenous Fashion Week (MMIFW)

Mentor Me (MM) at Indigenous Fashion Week (IFW) (MMIFW) will engage urban Aboriginal youth in care in traininga nd mentorships to empower their identities, community relationships, and employability skill development, through IFW's celebration of Indigenous pride in the creative regalia arts that story Indigenous identity in collective cultural meaning. IFW will gather 30 Indigenous-Canadian designers and artists for the first national showcase of these international clothing artists. The ongiong Mentor Me weekly group engages 15 young Indigenous women transitioning from care. MMIFW will recruit, engage, train and mentor 30 Indigenous youth-in-care in 4 urban and 2 rural training workshops, mentorships and employment. Indigenous youth, all systemically affected by the foster system will develop cultural identity, relationship, and employment skills. They be mentored with the IFW team and cultural advisory networks, and will be employed as presenters and producers at the event. Workshops after the event will gather the knowledge of these engaged youth to evaluate and design an enhanced Mentor Me program. MMIFW will create strong relationships between young people and their community members. Their experiential research into effective mentorship and skills development, focused through the creative art of IFW, will build community knowledge of how to support youth transitioning from care, activated in the MMIFW network.
$24,000.00
2016

Adoptive Families Association of British Columbia

Permanency Project for At Risk Youth

For the first time, AFABC would like to host a 3-day family finding bootcamp for homeless youth, and former youth in care experiencing loneliness. Every child has a family/network, and they can be found. Family Finding Boot Camps are a three day immersion for up to 50 youth and former youth in care learning the philosophy, framework and skills of Family Finding practice. Participants work in small and medium sized teams, actually practicing Family Finding for youth currently homeless, at risk of becoming homeless, or are experiencing loneliness. We would invite lead practitioner Kevin Campbell to host. In his previous bootcamps across the USA participants have successfully completed the Discovery and initial Engagement steps of Family Finding. The goal for the teams by day three of the training is to have found relatives and other connections, identified family members with functional strengths, engaged two lead family members, and invited found adults to a Preparation and Planning Meeting to be held following the bootcamp. Participants leave the immersion experience having learned and practiced the skills of Family Finding, developed a sense of confidence in their use of the skills, and feel confident in their ability to develop a personal support network. Our focus at AFABC includes following up with youth to ensure they are supported as they connect. Partnership opportunities: Broadway Youth Centre, Covenant House, Aunt Leah's, Federation of BC Youth in Care.
$25,000.00
2016

Speak-Out Youth Group

In 2009 AFABC partnered with MCFD to plan and implement a project aimed at increasing the number of permanency plans for youth in government care. The Speak-Out Youth Group evolved from this pilot in recognition of the value that both individual and collective perspectives and experiences played in the successful delivery of the initiative. 15 youth participants expressed an adamant interest in remaining connected to AFABC and the project in order to continue exploring options for permanence and develop more resource materials about teen adoption. The Speak-Out Youth Group is an empowering youth led program with 25 active members and consists of youth-in-care, former youth-in-care, and adoptees aged 13-24 from BC’s Vancouver Coastal and Fraser Regions. By focusing on youth engagement, this program gives a powerful voice to those who have experiences with the foster care system. Monthly meetings also give youth an opportunity to develop transferable life skills by working with career professionals, child and youth care representatives, and clinical counselors.
$20,000.00
2013

Arts in Action Society

Enterprising Youth

Through this project we will utilize a small cohort of youth to demonstrate their potential for independence and the existing capacity within youth exiting care to participate in, and eventually manage, visible mainstream spaces in Vancouver - spaces such as business, alternate and post secondary education, and community discussions of social issues affecting youth directly. This will be done by recruiting 4-6 young people between 17-24 who have experienced government care to participate in the Groundswell Business Alternatives Program. Through the program, youth will develop a project (ex. a socially-conscious small business, branded product, a non-profit or campaign) which at the end of the program will be presented as a Gala comprised of potential funders, community advocates, alumni and financial mentors. After the Gala, youth will use the mentors, alumni, and staff to carry out their project in the chosen community. The youth will be supported to find a project that will succeed, and will be supported by a wraparound community committed to their success in their chosen venture.
$30,000.00
2014

Youth Care Media Project (WORKING TITLE ONLY)

This digital storytelling project will work with a group of youth and youth technical mentors to create a series of digital stories. The themes of this project will centre around the participant's response to the lack of support for youth in government care as they reach adulthood. This project will mentor the youth in community engaged digital video production skills with the intention of inviting the participants to create stories that relate to the project's inquiry. This work is intended to challenge and question the current mainstream narrative on homelessness and youth. This project seeks to create venues and opportunities for youth from diverse backgrounds to question, respond, and provoke a greater public awareness of the issues facing youth and housing issues. Community video is created through collaboration with skilled artists and and sees production values as an inherent part of the process. The project will create these digital stories in a series of workshops. We are committed to a collaborative, respectful, and democratic working environment
$20,000.00
2013

Association of Neighbourhood Houses of British Columbia

Frames Film Project: Increasing Community Connectedness for Youth in Care

The Frames Film Project provides training, support, and voice to multi-barriered youth ages 16-24. Each twelve week intake includes 15-20 youth participants, 3 Frame graduates/mentors, and 2 part-time staff. Youth meet one evening each week to provide peer support; receive life and employment skills training; and collaborate to conceptualize, film and edit stories for community change. Previous Frames' films addressed community issues of substance misuse, mental health, multi-culturalism, and crime prevention. Intake 9 films will focus on youth approaches to increase community connectedness for youth in care. All Frames films are shared at quarterly community screening events. Over the past two and a half years, our approach has proven to help youth with significant barriers develop a wide range of skills and take steps towards employment and community attachment. Frames is recognized by the Globe and Mail, CBC, partner organizations, and film industry professionals as a leading youth program.
$25,000.00
2014

Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society

Get Outside BC 2017 – Fostering Change Edition

CPAWS-BC believes that in order to ensure conservation is a long-term priority, we need to equip the next generation of youth to feel safe exploring nature; to defend socially, culturally and biologically important spaces; and to lead their peers along a similar journey. We also need to ensure that all youth have these skills and experiences, and not just a privileged few. Get Outside BC (GOBC) is a longer term youth-led leadership program that supports young people gain the mental and physical health benefits of being in wilderness, while also being a leader in a larger social and environmental change movement. After speaking with young people and social service organizations, we learned that youth in care were craving the opportunities that GOBC offered but faced many barriers to participation. For example, some programs were prohibitively expensive for youth, or social service organizations didn’t have the capacity to start these programs on top of their regular programming. CPAWS-BC will work with youth in care, youth agencies and other experts to redesign GOBC specifically to meet the needs of youth in care. In doing so, we will amplify youth voice and engage young people and youth-serving orgs in creating a program formula that ensures full access and participation. Our longer-term goal is to demonstrate our outcomes for the larger community in order to make more inclusive and accessible spaces.
$25,000.00
2016

DIVERSEcity Community Resources Society

Finding Balance: Understanding the cultural needs of youth exiting care

The Finding Balance project is a response to challenges that have been identified by individuals and families, who access DIVERSEcity's services, identify as immigrants/newcomers and have involvement with the Ministry of Children and Family Development. The specific challenges are related to the response to cultural needs with an emphasis on youth who are at risk of disconnecting from their culture by virtue of their own choices but also because of the stigma attached to their access to the care system and community support. In our preliminary inquiries, we confirmed that information regarding culture or ethnicity is not currently tracked by MCFD with the exception of Aboriginal or non-Aboriginal identity. We concluded that in order to eventually serve the needs of immigrant/newcomer youth in the care system, a general understanding of whose these youth are is necessary. Our project will engage youth in the Surrey region in community based dialogue sessions with a particular focus on youth aged 16 years and older and who are currently or once were involved in MCFD care.
$25,000.00
2014

Fraser Region Aboriginal Friendship Centre Association

Awakening Our Spirit: Strengthening Cultural Connections for Aboriginal Youth

With our Vancouver Foundation Project, we will to engage with Aboriginal youth who have or currently are experiencing homelessness and foster care. Through our engagement, we will provide a bi-weekly Aboriginal culture sharing with Aboriginal youth who are, or were, affected by homelessness and foster care. The cultural sharing will lead up to our Coming of Age Ceremony. We have contacted local First Nations explaining our initiative, that we recognize their traditional territory and asking if they would like to host our ceremony in their longhouse. Additionally we are also building a relationship with another local that also plans to host a Coming of Age Ceremony. Our project and work is intended to evolve into a significant partnership and/or sharing ideas. In addition, we will support our youth in their development of an awareness resource, a video portraying their perspective of transitioning from youth to adulthood. FRAFCA will also support the youth in another resource development of a photo book with their stories of experiences of homelessness and foster care.
$25,000.00
2014

Global Youth Education Network Society

Ready to Lead: Organizing and Campaigning Skills for Youth

As Fostering Change sunsets from its leadership role, the baton needs to be passed to new leaders, and youth need to be at the forefront. Ready to Lead offers youth the skills to maintain the momentum created by Fostering Change, and run campaigns that create meaningful change for youth in care. It has four parts: 1)Annual 2-day tailored training. 2)Scholarship Fund to nurture skills of training alumni and train new activists. Provides ~25 spaces in full suite of Organize BC programs (see organizebc.ca). Includes $2,000/yr in trainee travel to Vancouver programs from elsewhere in BC. 3)Coaching for training alumni to support them in implementing new skills into campaigns. 4)The development of the training skills of 1-4 youth as trainers via OBC’s Train the Trainer program. We’ve discussed our proposal with staff at First Call BC, Aunt Leah’s Place, and Society for Children and Youth of BC. Each told us that they thought the training and coaching we propose would be valuable to support youth effectively engaging in advocacy. They all suggested that members of their, or other organizations’, Youth Advisory Councils would be the best candidates for training and support. One person said that many YACs seem to have trouble maintaining focus, and lack needed leadership training, while organizations struggle to find the resources and provide support. Each felt that more support and skills training for YACs would allow them to more effectively organize and advocate for change.
$25,000.00
2017

Greater Vancouver Regional District

Metro Vancouver 2011 Homeless Count

Since 2002, the Regional Steering Committee on Homelessness has conducted a triennial homeless count in metro Vancouver. The research process gathers detailed information on people who are homeless, allowing policymakers and service providers to target programs according to housing and support needs in each community. The next regional homeless count is planned for March 2011. Goals to improve count methodology include increasing the involvement and representation of typically marginalized and invisible homeless populations such as youth.
$20,000.00
2010

Hollyburn Family Services Society

Youth Unedited

Based on current research that youth in government care often feel powerless during the transitional process, the idea of 'Youth Unedited' was born. Youth Unedited, is an organic and youth driven process with short and long term goals that provide leadership and skill development training to empower youth to be leaders and advocates for positive change in the foster system. It is an intentional three part process that acts as a continuum for youth to share, dialogue, express and then transform their experiences living in and transitioning from government care. Youth Unedited has three specific objectives - share experiences - document experiences - transform experiences.
$25,000.00
2014

Leave Out Violence "LOVE"

Unpacking Home - Mobile Exhibit

In the fall of 2013 LOVE and the Vancouver Foundation collaborated to host Unpacking Home, an art exhibit which showcased visual and media arts from youth, aged 15-24, who had lived in-care and/or experienced homelessness. Through the creation of the art pieces and subsequent community dialogue the needs of youth exiting care were highlighted. One of the most successful aspects of the project was the reaction from youth in seeing their art and media projects on display. It was deeply impactful to see their voice and perspectives honoured and recognized in that way. Not all of the participants have seen their work on display. In particular we heard interest from staff and youth from Aunt Leah's that a mobile project would be welcome in their space. To build off the success of this project LOVE would like to reengage project participants in the creation of a mobile exhibit and facilitated dialogue process. The main purpose of this project would be to generate awareness about the experiences of youth homelessness as well as the needs of youth exiting care.
$23,500.00
2014

Lower Mainland Purpose Society for Youth and Families

New Westminster/Burnaby Youth Transition Advisory Committee

The aim of this project is to draw together New Westminster and Burnaby stakeholders to develop a collaborative/comprehensive approach to assist youth transitioning from care to independence, focusing on homelessness and specific life functioning challenges. The proposed Youth Transition Advisory Committee will be comprised of both government and community-based organizations with an investment in addressing these issues for youth currently and/or previously in care. This will involve strengthening the working relationships between stakeholders, completing a community analysis of factors influencing effective transitions, developing strategies that will integrate and maximise available services (building on existing community skills/capacities/assets) organized in a Community Action Plan and engaging in a practice/policy review leading to innovative recommendations. The intent of these activities is to improve overall life outcomes, and specifically housing outcomes, for these youth. A part-time Coordinator will be hired to coordinate and facilitate the work of the Committee.
$25,000.00
2014

McCreary Centre Society

Changing outcomes for youth in care – A Collective Impact approach

Collective Impact is a process which can be used to bring about change in complex problems in our communities. The Vancouver based project is using the Collective Impact process to bring stakeholders, youth and service providers together around a common goal, to improve the unfavourable outcomes experienced by many youth leaving government care. There are five mutually reinforcing conditions that are essential to the success of a Collective Impact approach to addressing a complex problem: developing a common vision across all stakeholders; introducing shared measurement across a service system; creating mechanisms for coordinated planning of different parts of a service system; creation of continuous communication protocols across stakeholders; and investment in dedicated system coordination. Phase 1 of the initiative (2014-2016) entailed assessing if there was a shared vision as well as willingness and ability to move forward collectively to support youth transitioning out of care in Vancouver. An initial vision was established that no youth will "age out of care." This means the system will address the need for youth to have caring connections in place, before they reach the age of 19. In Phase 2 (2016-2018), shared measures will be developed, a governance structure will be finalized and implemented, and there will be a focus on ensuring youth “ageing out” of care will have five caring connections. Project participants will examine existing service provision systems and supports (both formal and informal) that would need to realign in order to meet the vision. The knowledge and momentum gained in Phase 2 will create the opportunity to implement real change moving forward into Phase 3 (the sustainable action and impact phase). This application is to support the first six months of Phase 2 (June – December, 2016).
$25,000.00
2016

Ready to Rent BC Association

Landlord Guarantee Fund Research

Ready to Rent BC (R2R) has adapted a successful model from Portland that combines tenancy education, a completion certificate that acts as a reference, and landlord guarantee fund (LGF). This combination helps youth who may face barriers access good housing and have successful tenancies. LGFs are key in reducing landlord concerns related to turnover and damages, and can be a positive deciding factor when choosing to rent to a young person. The Portland LGF demonstrates an increase in tenancy length, reduction in stigma and, since the introduction of the Landlord Guarantee Fund, only 0.6% of tenancies have ever had a claim submitted for damages. R2R, in partnership with communities, provides effective education and certificate recognized by BC Housing and BCNPHA members. Determining how to implement a Landlord Guarantee Fund is the next step. R2R will partner with Aunt Leah's Place, the Friendly Landlord Network (FLN) and youth advisers to research implementation, operation, and sustainability of an LGF for youth in care. While the FLN will serve as the primary case study for initial implementation, the research project will develop a 'How To' toolkit for broader use. The project activities will also engage key stakeholders including youth, community organizations, landlords and property managers. The scope of research will also include financial models for scaling and identify potential sources of seed funds for establishing an active LGF.
$25,000.00
2017

Society for Affordable Housing Education, Awareness and Development

2017 Homeless Count

The Regional Steering Committee on Homelessness (RSCH) has conducted a regional homeless count every three years since 2002. In 2014, the last regional count, a total of 2,777 homeless people were counted in Metro Vancouver. 410 homeless children and youth were counted, representing 20% of the total individuals who responded to the age question. This included 88 children who were accompanied by a parent and under 19. The actual number of youth who are homeless - or who need help and services to end and prevent homelessness - is assumed to be much higher. With regards to youth, the project's goal is to provide a more accurate assessment of the number and demographic profile of homeless youth in Metro Vancouver. Our objectives are to: 1. Engage all youth-serving agencies across the lower mainland to participate in the Homeless Count to ensure that all youth are able to ‘count themselves in’ and answer the survey questions 2. Update existing information about homeless youth in Metro Vancouver: the number, demographic profile and trends since 2002. The gathered information provides organizations and communities with the evidence-base for attaining resources to be better able to undertake meaningful youth engagement and service delivery. Reflecting on past experiences we have decided to focus all our efforts on the core function of 'counting youth' through a robust youth strategy that is focused on agencies serving youth.
$20,000.00
2016

Society for Children and Youth of BC

Youth Led Staff Awareness Training

SCY will recruit and hire 4 youth in-and-out of care (2 in each of 2 communities), to partner with us in a Staff Training Project. They will identify customer service providers (ex. financial institutions) with whom they interact and who may benefit from awareness about experiences of youth in care and the importance of connections between these young people and their community. They will learn about the UNCRC and about a youth’s right to have their voice heard & valued. They will learn communication and workshop facilitation skills. They will work together and in consultation with other groups of youth, to build a training document and presentation for customer service staff to be co-facilitated by SCY and the Youth Coordinators. During past workshops with youth who are in or “aging out” of care, we learned about the common discrimination they experienced from customer service staff when those staff members learn that the youth they are serving are in foster care. For example, youth referred to financial institutions as being the main customer service providers that witness a young person’s ministry cheque, thus revealing their circumstances. One solution voiced by youth was the need for greater awareness. Groups we’ve talked to said they would be interested in training for staff. For example, Vancity said they make membership experience for youth a priority and are open to receiving youth-led staff training relating specifically to awareness building about youth in care.
$25,000.00
2016

My Life Through the Lens: A Youth Rights Photovoice Project

This project will recruit 20 youth transitioning from foster care in the Lower Mainland to participate in a project using the technique of photovoice. Youth will learn to express their stories and become agents for change in their communities. Youth who participated in an earlier version of this project will be consulted on the development of this workshop and youth guest speakers/facilitators will be asked to help with the workshops. Participants will learn about the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, metaphorical photography, leadership, grassroots social movements, communication, and social media. With ongoing support from the project coordinator, youth will take photos that represent issues related to their transition from care to adulthood and their rights, select their best photos, and create quotes that express the idea in the photo. Using their photos, youth will engage in their own public awareness campaign using social media and other methods. Youth will help organize a photo exhibit and gala event to which local decision makers will be invited so that youth will have another opportunity to have their voices heard. Following the event, youth will meet up to strategize on how they can move their public awareness campaigns forward. Additionally, SCY will document this experience, create a toolkit, hold workshops and participate in events for community and Fostering Change partners on how to do this type of youth engagement work for change in the future.
$20,000.00
2015

The MacMillan Family Foundation

Growing the Discourse — Journalism for Systems Change

Discourse Media proposes an ambitious plan to create: a permanent full-time child welfare reporter position; a permanent youth in/from care media fellowship; a deeply researched guidebook to support better media coverage and a national, collaborative network of journalists reporting on child welfare. In 2017, Discourse employed the only full-time child welfare “beat” reporter in Canada. This position is unique due to our commitment to relationship-building, community engagement and collaboration with youth. After spending a year asking questions about this system, we’ve been humbled by the sheer complexity of the system and honoured by people with lived experience who have spent time teaching us and pointing us to the many important stories that have gone untold. We want to play our learnings forward. We are motivated to change people’s impressions of media as a barrier to progress, and redefine media as a catalyst for positive social change. This grant would allow us to build on the work that we’ve done and expand it to meet the strong demand for better storytelling and reporting on this complex system. We want to work with our colleagues in media and community partners to spark solutions-focused conversations about child welfare that transcend regional systems and borders. We’ve seen that there’s appetite for this kind of network. Through this radically different, engagement-driven approach, we believe we can continue to shift the way media report on child welfare.
$25,000.00
2017

Tides Canada Initiatives Society

Engaging the Public on Solutions for Helping to End Youth Homelessness

$29,960.00
2012

Vancity Community Foundation

Fostering Change in Surrey: Wrapping the Community Around Kids Leaving Care

The Surrey Poverty Reduction Coalition (SPRC) exists to foster collaboration in Surrey to address the unique challenges of people living in poverty. With our diverse membership and strong links with the City of Surrey, we are well placed to bring together the various sectors that will be needed to make a deep and lasting impact in the lives of some of our most vulnerable young people. Using the framework of “THIS is how we end poverty in Surrey”, which focuses on four key policy areas that affect people living in poverty: Transportation, Housing, Income and Supports, and working in partnership with youth in/from care, the SPRC will engage the community to do a radical rethinking of the ways in which youth are supported when they transition from the care of the MCFD, into adulthood. Bringing our whole community along, including business, philanthropists, unions, etc. we are keenly interested in rethinking the way that we meet the needs of these young people, and helping them to be supported in achieving their aspirations. Using a collective impact approach, we will: compile available information and research on youth in/from care in Surrey; convene two multi-stakeholder workshops toward developing a framework for further action; and host a public event that will include the "The 19th Birthday Party" art exhibit. All phases of the project will engage youth in/from care - "not about them without them".
$30,000.00
2015

Vancouver Coastal Health Authority

Downtown Vancouver Youth Housing and Health Services Collaboratory

The Youth Housing and Health Services Collaboratory is an action-oriented project to engage key stakeholders involved in delivering health and housing resources to youth in downtown Vancouver. The 'collaboratory' will be a problem-solving group working to address barriers and challenges that youth 16-24 face accessing housing and health services. A parallel youth engagement process will inform the trajectory of the project and we will strive to make a meaningful difference in the experience of youth who seek resources related to housing and health. In order to improve access and flow-through for youth to a wider range of resources, agency representatives who are excited to, and capable of working as part of a collaborative team, and have a high level of management over the resources attached to the agency, will be invited to participate. Phase one will be a convened dialogue to ensure the group is aligned and 'on the same page'. Barriers to collaboration will be identified and addressed. Phase two will be a pilot of a mechanism to smooth access pathways to care and housing.
$23,500.00
2014