Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

Aunt Leah's Independent Lifeskills Society

The Link

Aunt Leah's provides semi-independent housing for sixteen foster teens, 15-18 years of age, who are preparing to live on their own when they 'age out' of care at 19. We provide a basement suite with a supportive landlord as well as pre-employment and life skills training. Despite this intervention, many of these children are not fully prepared to make a full and successful transition to adulthood. Many go through a series of tenancy breakdowns and couch surfing ending with a large percent on income assistance or experiencing homeless. In 2010, Vancouver Foundation began 3 years of funding for a second-stage program called The Link which provides transition workers, food & housing, and education opportunities for 30 youth (annually). Today, the demand for this program has risen with over 80 former foster kids served per annum. The Link mimics the care that parented youth receive well into early adulthood; over half of 20-something Canadians choose to live at home. Over 40% of BC foster youth experience homeless after age 19; yet 90% of Link youth maintain safe affordable housing.
$100,000.00
2013

The Link

Aunt Leah's provides semi-independent housing for sixteen foster teens, 15-18 years of age, who are preparing to live on their own when they 'age out' of care at 19. We provide a basement suite with a supportive landlord as well as pre-employment and life skills training. Despite this intervention, many of these children are not fully prepared to make a full and successful transition to adulthood. Many go through a series of tenancy breakdowns and couch surfing ending with a large percent on income assistance or experiencing homeless. In 2010, Vancouver Foundation began 3 years of funding for a second-stage program called The Link which provides transition workers, food & housing, and education opportunities for 30 youth (annually). Today, the demand for this program has risen with over 80 former foster kids served per annum. The Link mimics the care that parented youth receive well into early adulthood; over half of 20-something Canadians choose to live at home. Over 40% of BC foster youth experience homeless after age 19; yet 90% of Link youth maintain safe affordable housing.
$100,000.00
2013

Hollyburn Family Services Society

Life Success Program

The Life Success Program (LSP) is a transitional housing program that supports homeless transitional aged youth, ages 18-24, to acquire the skills needed to live independently. Key areas of focus include life skills, employment, education, interpersonal relationships and community integration. The Life Success Program gives homeless youth a chance to get on their feet, build skills, and form a web of community resources around them while being encouraged and supported in creating a healthy and balanced lifestyle. Referrals come directly from the young persons themselves, other community resource providers, teachers, social workers, and families. The Life Success Program has access to a variety of groups from the Transition to Adulthood program in support of identified clients goals. The variety of programs provided include the Budget Chef cooking program, Girls Group, the Outdoor Education Program, the Hollyburn / Chill Snowboarding program, a community garden and Hollyburn Hockey Heroes.
$100,000.00
2013

McCreary Centre Society

Youth Research Academy: Post majority research pilot

A shortage of longitudinal data exists about the challenges, supports and successes youth aging out of care experience. McCreary aims to use the expertise gathered by conducting surveys such as the BC AHS and Homeless and Street Involved Youth Survey (HSIYS), and longitudinal studies (e.g., 3-year evaluation following youth leaving PLEA) to support the YRA to develop and deliver a pilot study tracking youth as they age out of care. The YRA have been trained in survey development, data entry, analysis and dissemination. They have also been involved in focus groups and consultations with youth in and from government care. They will apply their developing research skills to this project. The project will follow established research ethics protocols for data collection and storage consistent with those used in other McCreary projects. Established protocols are also in place to ensure the secure handling of identifying information. Following youth and adult stakeholder consultations and with support from McCreary, TRRUST Collective Impact partners, and the YRA advisory committee, YRA members will develop a pilot study about the experiences of BC youth who age out of care. This post majority survey will canvass responses from youth approaching their 19th birthday and at two future time points (6 and 12 months). The YRA will be involved in all aspects of the project, from survey design to data analysis and dissemination.
$100,000.00
2017

PHS Community Services Society

PHS Youth Research Iniative

Through the PHS Youth Housing First Project we became aware of the fact that the majority of youth in the DTES were exited prematurely from the foster care system and that the correlation between their drug use, homelessness, transition to IV drug use and the connection to a premature exit from care needed to be explored more extensively. For this new project we would like to assign a researcher and a youth research assistant to gather pertinent info using primary sites such as Insite, New Fountain Shelter, PHS housing sites for youth and our Overdose Prevention Sites to gather data, and disseminate the findings. The tools we would use are, surveys, qualitative interviews, internal age based confidential statistics from Insite, and other referral sites. The specific information we will be trying to extract is: which young people (who we come into contact with at these sites between 16-30) had involvement with the child welfare system, at which age they entered that system, what was the age and point of exit from the child welfare system, when the youth started using drugs, the correlation between drug use and insecure housing, and what the housing trajectory has been since.
$90,000.00
2017

Ready to Rent BC Association

Building Capacity through Education

Building Capacity through Education will build upon the recent Peers for Housing Stability initiative. Though Peers, R2R developed a youth-specific course and trained youth facilitators to co-facilitate 20 RentReady sessions in the Lower Mainland. Emerging feedback from community partners has indicated a demand for capacity building to deliver the training in-house, both the youth-specific RentReady course as well as the broader, certificate-backed RentSmart course. In speaking to youth, R2R has also identified the need to develop tools that address roommate living situations, often a requirement for affordability but legally in the grey zone and a source of many issues and conflicts. Finally, there is a need for increased awareness and expansion of the Ready to Rent model amoung landlords and housing providers in the Lower Mainland. The goals for Building Capacity are as follows: - to train community organizations in the Lower Mainland to become RentSmart and RentReady facilitators and be able to deliver the curriculum to their youth populations - to increase awareness of the RentSmart certificate amoung landlords and housing providers - to pilot and implement RentSmart within the public, alternative and aboriginal school systems - to develop tools, resources and supports to assist youth to identify and navigate successful roommate living situations
$100,000.00
2015

Vancity Community Foundation

Connecting Community to Surrey Youth Leaving Care, Phase 2

Building on the outcomes and learning from phase 1, this project will take the next step in engaging community members to support Surrey youth transitioning from care. The goals of the project are: youth engagement/voice; taking local action; raising public awareness; and collaboration with the local Aboriginal friendship centre. An advisory group of youth in and from care will guide every stage of the project. They will participate in a weekend retreat, where they will prioritize ideas from the key themes of education; skills training and employment; housing; physical and mental health; and connections with others, identified in phase 1. Phase 1 participants and others will then convene to develop specific action plans and mobilize the community to roll out initiatives for 3-5 priority activities, which will be evaluated and revised if necessary, to ensure that they continue after project completion. We will convene events in years 2 and 3 that bring together community stakeholders in Surrey, to share knowledge and solutions for youth aging out of care. A web-based resource will be developed and distributed widely, to profile the project, list current initiatives for use by practitioners and youth aging out of care, and describe systemic reforms needed for lasting change. Partnership with FRAFCA will enhance Indigenous cultural awareness and inform priority activities. The final activity will be a public engagement event intended to promote and sustain the projects.
$100,000.00
2016