Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

Arthritis Research Canada (ARC)

"It IS About Us". a reference manual for patients participating in health research.

Patient engagement in research occurs when patients meaningfully collaborate in the research process, taking an active role from the start in advising on a research project, project design or carrying out the research. This is important as it contributes greatly to research relevancy, credibility and accountability - issues important to patients. We propose to develop a comprehensive, user friendly manual “It IS About Us" based on over a decade of experience of ARC's Arthritis Patient Advisory Board (APAB). The Board is a diverse group of arthritis patients who have ample expertise with all aspects of arthritis research. In leveraging the knowledge and experience of their involvement in the research process, the manual will support growth and sustainability of infrastructure that will optimize patient engagement in health research. ARC has a strong history of involving patients and is believed to be one of the few research centres in the world that maintains a Patient Advisory Board to promote consumer involvement in research and knowledge translation activities. We will conduct a comprehensive and inclusive study to include all aspects of the patient concerns from their point of view to build capacity for consumer participation in research decision-making and knowledge translation activities through training and provision of ongoing education to new consumer collaborations. Currently, no standard published protocols written by patients for patients are available.
$10,000.00
2015

British Columbia's Women's Hospital and Health Centre Foundation

Exploring Marginalized Women's Physical Activity and Inactivity in BC - Development Phase

BC Women’s is requesting seed funding to support, in partnership with Promotion Plus (PPlus), BCCEWH's development of a community-based research (CBR) and knowledge exchange project on the social determinants of physical activity and inactivity for marginalized women in BC. The need for this project developed from previous research, knowledge syntheses, interventions, and policy dialogues conducted by BCCEWH and PPlus, all of which identified the need for community-engaged explorations of how to improve marginalized women’s opportunities for physical activity and health promotion. This pilot project focuses on a series of community consultation processes to inform the development of a more comprehensive proposal. During this development stage, our goals are to: 1) establish a Provincial Advisory Committee (PAC), 2) identify three diverse communities as sites for Participatory Action Research (PAR) projects, and 3) formulate a Community of Practice (CoP) inclusive of diverse women, service providers, policy-makers, and researchers interested in ongoing province-wide knowledge development, mutual learning, and action. These activities will provide the necessary groundwork and relationship building with community-based stakeholders across BC to inform the submission of a full research proposal and undertake a more robust community-based participatory research project.
$10,000.00
2010

Canadian Centre For Policy Alternatives

Addressing Inequities at the Intersection of Health and Climate Change (Co-lead researchers: Marc Lee, CCPA; Tim Takaro, SFU

This proposal is for a $10,000 development grant to explore how health, equity and climate change can be addressed in an integrated way that benefits vulnerable populations and communities. Since 2009, CCPA has been leading, in partnership with the University of British Columbia, a major academic-community research and engagement collaboration called the Climate Justice Project: Paths to an Equitable and Sustainable BC Economy (CJP). This proposed research project emerged out of a growing interest from multiple CJP partners to explore the potential for climate change mitigation and adaption strategies to also address determinants of health and health inequities. While a lot of research recognizes healthy environments and a healthy climate are important determinants of health, a more fulsome look at how climate change adaptation and mitigation strategies impact health inequities is needed. We are proposing to use this development grant to accomplish three broad goals: i) conduct preliminary research and review of existing, BC-specific, policy links between climate justice and health; ii) build capacities for collaboration and connectedness within and across diverse communities and sectors such as social justice, health, environmental and academic sectors and (iii) define specific research questions to be explored further in a collaborative community based research project. Reserach Team Member: Kerri Klien, Provincial Facilitator
$10,000.00
2012

Centre for Community Based Research

Social Media Based Knowledge Hub: Facilitating Access to Knowledge

Building on the momentum of CU Expo 2008, held in Victoria, BC, CU Expo 2011 aims to highlight the use of creative methods of research to meet community needs and produce results that are important and useful to community members, academics, and policy makers. The conference, running from May 10-14, 2011 in Waterloo, Ontario, is expected to bring together 800 people from six continents. Many of the people who were present in Victoria in 2008 are expected to attend. However many more people in British Columbia and around the world are passionate about the power of community-based research to effect change, yet are unable to attend the conference in person. This project seeks to extend and enrich the conference experience both for those who attend the conference and for those who are unable to attend in person by using readily accessible social media tools including Facebook, Twitter, blogs, and web conferencing technology to create a Knowledge Hub. The Hub provides a participatory, interactive and inclusive way to share and discuss knowledge presented at CU Expo 2011.
$3,000.00
2011

City of Richmond

Cultivating Wellness Connections in Richmond

Origin- In 2008 with seed funding from the Union of BC Municipalities, Minoru Seniors Society (MSS) together with City of Richmond Senior Services (CORSS) and key community stakeholders, undertook an innovative pilot program to promote social participation and inclusion among vulnerable and isolated older adults. Adapted from leisure education and participation framework Wellness Connections (WC) received a BCRPA Provincial Award of Program Excellence, and was sustained through Vancouver Coastal Health (VCH) funding. Need- WC has served more than 500 English and Mandarin/Cantonese speaking older adults over 7 years. WC plays a unique role in the network of community programs older adults facing multiple barriers to social participation and access to health services. While some are being served, many are not, and the need for high-quality programs that support independence and health is growing, while programs and services are decreasing. Project- With VCH funding for WC now at an end (March 2015), our project aims to harness and expand the successful collaborative approach to serving vulnerable older adults using a community-based participatory research (CBR) process. WC has enable us to build relationships with hundreds of vulnerable older adults in Richmond, providing an unique opportunity in involve them in further breaking down the barriers to social participation and inclusion together with a rich variety of community stakeholders.
$10,000.00
2015

Crisis Intervention and Suicide Prevention Centre of British Columbia

Advancing Lifesaving Enhancements to the Follow-up of Suicidal Individuals

Suicide is an important public health issue where an average of 10 people die by suicide each day in Canada. As identified in The Cost of Injury in Canada, a study funded by the Public Health Agency of Canada (June 2015), in 2010 there were 510 deaths by suicide in BC alone. In the same year, suicide and self-harm also resulted in 4539 emergency visits and 2855 hospitalizations, resulting in indirect and direct costs totalling $410M within the province. While the human cost of pain, grief and suffering are intangible, the economic costs of suicide are tangible and have resulted in significant economic challenges to the healthcare system. With a comprehensive case-managed 24/7 continuum of community support, the research shows that many of the 500+ deaths in BC can be prevented. Many suicidal people often do not seek support due to stigma around suicide. Crisis line contact, with its 24/7 accessibility and safety to reach out, can increase engagement and establish trust and further help seeking. With the already established rapport, our extended follow up process will help suicidal clients to better manage their own safety; however, phone and online service may not be sufficient to meet clients’ needs and face to face services are often required. Currently, fragmented service delivery processes exist for suicidal individuals. We are researching the impact of a structured follow up process over a period of time to determine the impact on connectedness and continuity of care.
$10,000.00
2016

Fraser Health Authority

Postpartum Cardiovascular Risk Reduction in South Asian Women

Pre-eclampsia is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease with up to seven times higher than unaffected women. This risk of cardiovascular disease can occur as early as ten years after the index pregnancy. The postpartum period is a unique window of opportunity to engage young women and address their long-term health needs. South Asian women have an already increased risk of cardiovascular and have a distinctive cardiovascular profile. South Asian women in the Fraser Health region are predominantly newly arrived immigrants who face complex socio-cultural and economic challenges and are therefore particularly disadvantaged. Our social innovation idea is to develop a specialized South Asian postpartum cardiovascular health program that respects culture and builds a treatment plan around the individual needs and values of South Asian women in the Fraser Health region. In order to design such a program, we seek to engage locally affected South Asian women in a participatory approach so that the design and delivery of the program is informed by the priorities and preferences of the women it aims to serve.
$9,932.00
2015

Improving Access to Primary Health Care in Aboriginal Communities in the Fraser Development Grant (Co-lead Researchers: Ms. Leslie Bonshor, Director, Aboriginal Health, Fraser Health Authority, and Dr. John O'Neil, Professor, Faculty of Health Sciences, SFU)

This proposal outlines activities to develop a research proposal for a community-based participatory research study to examine barriers and facilitators to accessing primary health care for Aboriginal communities in the Fraser Health region. Fraser Health communities were extensively involved in the 2011 CIHR project, which identified access to primary health care as a key issue. Further community engagement for the development of a new research proposal will be conducted and additional community members and representatives will be invited to join the research team. We propose a development project from January 2014 to December 2014. The initial phase of the project will focus on community engagement and consultation as well as building the research team and further developing partnerships. The second phase will focus on reviewing the literature, finalizing research questions and writing the grant proposal. Research Team members: Ms. Kelow Edehl and Mr. James George.
$10,000.00
2013

Nikkei Seniors Health Care and Housing Society

Dementia Outreach with Ethno-cultural Minority Communities: Addressing Issues of Culture, Stigma and Social Isolation (Co-lead Researchers Cathy Makihara, Nikkei Seniors Health Care and Housing Society; Dr. Karen Kobayashi, UVIC)

Dementia Outreach with Ethno-cultural Minority Communities: Addressing Issues of Culture, Stigma and Social Isolation (Research team: N/A)
$10,000.00
2014

Positive Women's Network Society

Women's Health Action Research Initiative

We will engage in a series of activities pertaining to the Women's Health Action Research Initiative. Action Research is research conducted to clarify and solve current problems as well as to reflect on the very process of problem solving carried out by individuals working with others collaboratively or as part of a community to improve their methods of approaching and solving issues. The areas of activity underpinning the process we would like to undertake are as follows: 1. Research—literature review, environment scan, focus groups. 2. Knowledge development and action planning with communities—participant scope and methodology. We will determine if and when external stakeholders may be consulted, based on questions such as: What are the opinions of women living with Hep C who are not currently accessing services? What do PWN's top donors think about how the expanded organization’s mandate to include prevention programming should be carried out? 3. Convening— 4 meetings with staff, female members of PWN, invested stakeholders, experts in the field of HIV and HepC 4. Report preparation—merger of mixed methods analysis using multiple information sources into final report that recommends program strategies for supporting the reduction of HIV rates for women living with Hep C. This report will be a template that can be used for other vulnerable populations of women (e.g. Aboriginal, newly immigrated, transgendered, etc.).
$9,525.00
2015

Shuswap Association for Community Living

Community Building Now!

The Community Building Now project will engage people with and without disability to work together to research and identify civic issues that can be addressed to build a better community through action influencing positive civic change in Salmon Arm and area. We plan to accomplish this with Participatory Action Research bringing together a diverse group of participants to co-research what they and other community members would like to see change in their community to better meet the needs of a broad community. The project team will work collaboratively to develop methodologies to survey the community of Salmon Arm utilizing Photovoice, written surveys and interviews to gather data related to community development possibilities and analyze the results to develop actions to promote change to support the needs of a diverse community. Participants in the project will develop their personal and collective capacities by working together exchanging mentorship to increase personal capacities to effect ongoing change in their community that positively impacts the quality of life in our community. The project will create long lasting mutually beneficial social relationships; build essential community building skills and valuable roles & working partnerships that include people with intellectual & other disabilities sustaining long term, ongoing influence leaving a legacy of an inclusive community that embraces diversity, quality of life and full civic engagement for all citizen
$10,000.00
2016

Community Building Now

The Community Building Now project will engage people with and without disability to work together collaboratively to research and identify common issues and concerns related to building better communities that creates action resulting in positive social change and ongoing influence in Salmon Arm and area that benefits the community collectively. We plan to accomplish this through Participatory Action Research to bring together a diverse group of participants to research what they and other community members would like to see change in their community that will result in a better, stronger community. Participants will receive formal training about how to create and sustain ongoing collaborative relationships, effective means to build better, stronger communities and how to implement action planning to meet the needs of diverse communities. Participants in the project will develop their personal and collective capacities by working together with the exchange of mentorship to increase their personal capacities to effect ongoing change in their community and positive impact on the community as a whole. The project will create long lasting mutually beneficial social relationships; build essential community building skills and valuable roles & working partnerships that will sustain long term influence and a legacy of a community that embraces diversity and full civic engagement.
$10,000.00
2015

Society for Affordable Housing Education, Awareness and Development

Surviving not Thriving: The Systemic Barriers to Housing for Women Leaving Violence

The Shedding Light on the Barriers to Housing for Women Fleeing Violence Photovoice project (Shedding Light) was previously funded by the BC Medical Services Foundation and was successfully completed as of March 2010. This community-based, feminist participatory action research project was conducted in four communities across BC and engaged forty-five diverse women in photo-taking, interviews and focus groups in order to share their experiences of seeking housing after leaving violence. The purpose of the current proposed project is to professionally produce an advocacy report that maximizes the impact of photo- and text-based data generated by participants to effectively translate the knowledge generated from the Shedding Light project. The provincial and community-based organizations who partnered to facilitate Shedding Light will use this report in their advocacy and awareness-building efforts with the ultimate goal of addressing barriers to housing and improving access to housing for women who have left violent relationships.
$10,000.00
2010

The Centre for Sustainable Food Systems

Intercultural Food Security and Health Study (Co-lead researchers Dr. Hannah Wittman, UBC; Colin Dring, Richmond Food Security Society)

Intercultural Food Security and Health Study (Research Team: N/A)
$10,000.00
2014

Tides Canada Foundation

Urban Aboriginal Peoples Study: City of Vancouver report and public engagement

The Urban Aboriginal Peoples Study is an extensive new research study that has gone beyond the numbers to capture the values, experiences and aspirations of Aboriginal peoples living in Vancouver, Edmonton, Calgary, Regina, Saskatoon, Winnipeg, Thunder Bay, Toronto, Montreal, Halifax and Ottawa. Speaking directly with a representative group of 2,614 First Nations peoples, Métis and Inuit living in these major Canadian cities, as well as 2,501 non-Aboriginal Canadians, the Environics Institute, led by Michael Adams, has released the Urban Aboriginal Peoples Study, which offers Canadians a new perspective of their Aboriginal neighbours. Guided by an Advisory Circle, Aboriginal people designed the research themes, methodology, and executed the main survey. City findings are now available, beginning with the Regina City Report, and the Toronto City Report, which takes a look at the Urban Aboriginal Peoples Study results specifically through a community based lens on each of those cities. Also available for download is a power point Regina presentation, and a Toronto presentation of the results. This project focuses on the City of Vancouver and compares Vancouver to the overall study results and to other cities. The Vancouver City Report will analyze the date generated by the overall study for city specific results and provide key insights in program and policy development.
$10,000.00
2011

UBC - BC Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS

A novel approach to innercity drug scenes: A participatory peer program utilizing community-mindness

Inner-city drug scenes are typically tackled with repression and eviction. Since drug cultures can only be modified but not eradicated, the effects of repressive measures are frequently counterproductive to the pursued goal: Individually and socially adverse phenomena related to the scene including violence, crime, ill health, and socio-economic marginalization tend to be aggravated and the scene to turn fragmented and underground. The latter implies that the subculture becomes even less accessible for external intervention and control. The fundamentally novel and pioneering aspect of this project is to explicitly utilize rather than destroy the social structure of the scene by assessing and promoting subcultural community-minded norms and behaviors. Subcultural community-mindedness can be fostered from the sides of all involved including drug intervention, prevention, and policy, police, criminal justice, health care, and education. The project focusses on participatory peer intervention, which lies within the domain of drug intervention and employs elements of community psychology. The project is novel also insofar, as that members of the drug scene themselves will be involved centrally, as well as the community, in which the drug scene is located. Thus, the social status of drug users, who frequently encounter stigmatization and exclusion due to their illicit involvement, can be strengthened and general health, social security, and a communal spirit within the community.
$10,000.00
2015

UBC - Department of Medicine Department of Medicine

Addiction treatment engagement among youth: Community-researcher-practice partnerships

In Greater Vancouver, youth (14 to 26 years of age) who engage in higher intensity drug use are vulnerable to numerous harms. Addiction treatment remains a cornerstone of addressing these harms. However, we continue to experience difficulties connecting youth with addiction treatment in our setting, even when services are available. A more in depth understanding of both the challenges and opportunities that shape youth’s access to a rapidly evolving landscape of addiction treatment in Greater Vancouver is urgently needed. Addressing this knowledge gap is particularly salient for vulnerable subpopulations of youth who use drugs, including street involved youth, gender variant and sexually diverse youth, and Indigenous youth. The aim of the proposed activities is to catalyze a new program of qualitative and ethnographic research that explores youth’s engagement with addiction treatment, care and recovery in Greater Vancouver, both across time, and across institutional settings. The goal of this new program of research is to inform and advocate for innovative addiction treatment services for youth in our setting. We request financial support in order to: 1. Host two planning meetings with local knowledge users, community stakeholders and members of the research team in Vancouver 2. Conduct exploratory interviews with local youth who engage in higher intensity drug use and local addiction care providers 3. Develop and submit a research funding proposal
$9,870.00
2016

UBC - Department of Psychology

Promoting Healthy Aging through Intergenerational Programming (Dr. Christiane Hoppman/Ms. Sandra Petrozzi)

This planning grant takes an innovative approach to health promotion in an aging population by capitalizing on the important role of social factors. Specifically, we will develop community-based intergenerational programs that harvest older adults' skills and needs to leave a lasting legacy while at the same time increasing leisure time physical activity such as "purposeful walking" as well as providing cognitive stimulation. Therefore, intergenerational programs have the potential for high "buy-in" because they contribute to older adults' purpose in life and simultaneously foster health-promoting behaviors that are well known to contribute to healthy aging. The project stems from a need to develop sustainable programs that will promote the health of a growing population of older adults, while supporting the social and academic development of children from immigrant and low-income families. This project will explore facilitators and barriers to intergenerational programming in the local context, from the perspectives of program administrators, parents of young children, and older adult program participants. We will do this through focus group discussions, a symposium, and participatory research methods. We will then use the knowledge gained to develop feasible, evidence-based implementation strategies for intergenerational programming that will, in turn, form the basis of a larger program implementation project. Research Team: Dr. Christiane Hoppman/Ms. Sandra Petrozzi
$4,945.00
2012

UBC - Okanagan

A community ­based intervention to support belonging among the S. S. Indian­-Canadian diaspora

Project background/need: The idea for this project arose from prior research in the South Similkameen (SS) focused on understanding the experiences of belonging and mental well-being among Indian­ Canadian residents. During this pilot work, we interviewed and consulted with local residents and stakeholders. Key barriers to belonging and wellbeing that Indian-Canadians reported included 1. limited participation in local decision-making; 2. challenges in accessing culturally-appropriate services and; 3. multi-generational tensions hindering community and familial bonding. Potential knowledge/ action: Our project aim is to develop a collaborative planning strategy to launch a community-­based intervention that can address these issues and support a greater sense of belonging and wellbeing among the S.S. Indian-­Canadian diaspora. Jointly with local Indian-Canadian residents and other community partners, we will work to: 1. develop consensus on a priority area that can build a sense of belonging and wellbeing; 2. map out skills and strengths that can help us develop a strategy to address this priority area and; 3. build capacity among local residents to implement and evaluate such an intervention. These activities can change social systems by changing "basic routines" (e.g. decision­ making processes) and beliefs (e.g. assuming services can be 'one size fits all') enabling us to address root causes of exclusion and poor mental health affecting rural immigrant populations.
$9,958.00
2015

UBC - The Collaborating Centre for Prison Health

Growing Great Kids Out of Homelessness

Children experiencing homelessness have poorer outcomes when compared to other children, their mothers often struggle with social isolation, and there is a strong link to entering the child welfare system. Growing Great Kids Out of Homelessness will address this issue and seek to influence system change by creating a collaborative, multi-sectoral, peer-led participatory research project. Through the opportunity to experience themselves as co-creators of safe, supportive environments, homeless women and children can restore their health and well-being in an environment of dignity that offers women increased agency and engagement with others, while keeping families intact.
$10,000.00
2017

United Chinese Community Enrichment Services Society (S.U.C.C.E.S.S.)

Stories of Our Ancestors: Intergenerational Trauma Among Chinese-Canadian Families

The traumatic narratives of Chinese immigration to Canada and its impact on future generations are mostly unknown. The silence of these migration experiences may be related to surviving collective trauma. Understanding the stigma, shame and fear of Chinese-Canadians who migrated to escape persecution, imprisonment and torture will assist Canadian health care providers to develop strategies to understand and treat pre- and post-migration trauma. Intergenerational trauma is an important construct for understanding the mental health of survivors and their families. We know that individuals and families who have suffered through significant collective traumas are unlikely to obtain professional support. Likewise, Chinese-Canadians underutilize mental health services and there is significant shame and stigma with regards to mental illness in this population. As intergenerational trauma among Chinese people is unexplored in the literature, the social innovation idea is to create a dialogue between older generations and younger generations to work across the divide of silence to bring understanding to family members by breaking the silence of the past. Once the social implications are understood we will be able to devise health care strategies to reduce the stigma and shame of seeking mental health care within this population. As intergenerational trauma is considered to be a broad social determinant of health, it has implications for education, employment, and general well-being.
$10,000.00
2015

University of British Columbia Development Office

2009-2010 Vancouver Foundation First Nations Scholarship

Vancouver Foundation First Nations Scholarship: annual scholarship(s) for a graduate student(s) in the Health Sciences. Established by Dr. John H.V. Gilbert, for a First Nations student enrolled in a professional degree program in Health or Human Services. Students wishing to be considered for the award should apply to the Institute for Aboriginal Health, 429 - 2194 Health Sciences Mall, UBC by the November 30 deadline. The award is made by nomination of the selection committee, Institute for Aboriginal Health.
$5,000.00
2010

University of British Columbia School of Social Work

Sexual Health Knowledge and Intellectual Disability (Dr. Rachelle Hole, UBC / Angela Clancy, Family Support Institute)

Individuals with intellectual disability (ID) face unique challenges in relation to sexual health and realizing their sexual identity and expression. A lack of appropriate sexual education is evident. This lack of education increases threats of disease, abuse, and/or mental health issues, especially for those who do not conform to heterosexual norms. The FSI and the CIC are working to foster dialogue, develop resources and support leadership to address this community identified need. In this project, FSI and the CIC will partner with key stakeholders (e.g., Spectrum Society, Langley Association), centring the voices, experiences and leadership of individuals with ID (self advocates), to build understanding, awareness and capacity about sexual health, sexual expression and sexual diversity for individuals with ID, families and service providers. Within a participatory frame, we will engage with self advocates and allies to identify gaps in sexual health knowledge; develop knowledge and community resources for promoting positive sexual health and sexuality; and, engage stakeholders to develop and implement knowledge translation strategies. The research questions are: 1) What are self advocates' experiences of sexual health knowledge and education? 2) What information is needed to achieve successful sexual health education and positive sexual expression? 3) What strategies do self advocates and allies identify as most effective to promote positive sexual health and sexuality?
$10,000.00
2014

University of Victoria

Development Phase - Community Food Literacy Participatory Action Research Project (Co-lead Researchers: Dr. Trevor Hancock, Professor, UVIC and Ms. Linda Geggie, Coordinator, Capital Region Food and Agriculture Initiatives Roundtable).

The Development Grant will help us to bring together academic and community partners to develop the Community Food Literacy PAR Project proposal. Community practitioners have identified the need to build community food literacy. We define food literacy to be the ability to access, understand and evaluate information related to food (e.g., how to select and prepare food), including knowledge of where food comes from, its environmental impact and the connection to food through culture and society. The project will advance our understanding of how to coordinate and strengthen community food literacy programs that empower participants to increase control over, and improve their health. A multi-sector advisory group will support the project team to engage community agencies to contribute to and refine, our working definition of food literacy. We will share the information gathered through the Community Food Feasibility Study (appendix 2) in regards to current practices, gaps and opportunities to build food literacy. We will ask the community to reflect on the findings, refine and prioritize research questions, and identify the best methods to gather, share, and take action on what we learn together. In addition at the BC Food Systems Network Gathering we will determine the best methods for knowledge translation so that we can effectively share our findings. Finally we will develop a research proposal and formalize partnerships to move the project forward. Research Team members: Ms. Wanda Martin, Co-Researcher, Mr. Aaren Topley, Research Team member, and Ms. Joan Wharf Higgins, Research Student support.
$10,000.00
2013

University of Victoria - Faculty of Human and Social Development

Indigenous, Participatory, Culturally-Grounded Arts-Informed Research Insititute 2015 (Researchers: N/A)

Indigenous, Participatory, Culturally-Grounded Arts-Informed Research Insititute 2015 (Research Team: N/A)
$10,000.00
2014

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