Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

Pacific AIDS Network

SPEAKING MY TRUTH: The Canadian HIV Stigma Index CBR Project in British Columbia (Co-lead researchers Jennifer Evin Jones, Pacific Aids Network and Catherine Worthington, UVIC)

The HIV Stigma Index is a dynamic partnership born out of a community-identified need to turn the tide against persistent HIV stigma and discrimination in BC. In this, the 5th year of the global implementation of the Stigma Index, 50 countries have completed the study, with more than 1300 People living with HIV (PLHIV) trained as interviewers and 45,000 PLHIV interviewed. It is time for Canada and BC to join this international movement. With support from the VF, the BC arm of this national study will be able to move forward to build our team first, increase the reach of the project into rural areas and hard-to-reach populations, and mentor additional PLHIVs as research leaders. This CBR project will be the first ever Canadian study to document experiences of stigma and discrimination from the perspective of people living with HIV. This action-oriented project will translate community experiences into language decision-makers can effectively use; build a shared agenda to influence programs, services and policies; and positively impact individuals involved. The Stigma Index is both a process (of building partnerships & capacity) and an action-based research tool (building on a quantitative & qualitative questionnaire). Designed by and for PLHIV, and led by PLHIV, this project will inform better evidence-based responses to HIV and related issues at all levels, and will empower the community to take a leap forward in the struggle for freedom from HIV stigma and discrimination. Research team: Melanie Rusch, Island Health; Andrea Langlois, Pacific AIDS Network; Andrew Beckeman, AIDS Vancouver; Charles Osborne, BC Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS; Darren Lausher, Peer Research Associate; Jonathan Postnikoff, Research Assistant UBC; Romari Undi, Intl. Community of Women living with HIV; Sergio Rueda, Population Health Research
$141,143.00
2014

The Good Samaritan Society

The Imagination Network

What roles do people living with the experience of dementia want to play in our communities? This is the question at the heart of The Imagination Network. While rates of dementia rise in our communities [1], the voices of individuals with lived experience of dementia - their thoughts, stories, and ideas—fade into the background. In the emerging field of dementia advocacy, Swaffer (2014) coined the term “prescribed disengagement” to connote how once a person is diagnosed with dementia they are expected to disengage from society and to prepare for the inevitable decline in their cognitive abilities [2]. Current care practices for dementia focus almost exclusively on mitigating the biomedical “losses” for the individual and their caregivers. The Imagination Network shifts this focus towards creativity and citizenship by proposing a rigorous exploration of “prescribed engagement”. As a social innovation, The Imagination Network is centered on valuing people with the lived experience of dementia as contributors to society with important stories to tell. The Imagination Network combines Community Based Participatory Research (CBPR) with Community-Engaged Arts Practice (CEAP) to engage participants with lived experience of dementia in the development of an evidence-based interdisciplinary theatrical production that tells their collective story. The ultimate goal is to foster engagement and build social inclusion for people living with the experience of dementia.
$149,736.00
2016

UBC - BC Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS

Through our own eyes – Disclosure, Stigma and Criminalization of HIV in British Columbia

Canada stands out globally in its assertive approach to the criminalization of HIV non-disclosure. The emphasis on criminal law in regulating HIV non-disclosure continues despite increasing evidence that the criminal law is an ineffective tool to prevent HIV transmissions. While frequently represented as a law that ‘protects’ women, to date there is limited understanding of how this law uniquely shapes the lived-experiences of women living with HIV/AIDS (WLWH) and the severe stigmatization they face. To gain a better understanding of the gendered impact of this law, we propose a group-based participatory photovoice project, where WLWH in a group setting collaborate to depict how the criminalization of HIV non-disclosure shapes the negotiation of intimate relationships, HIV disclosure, HIV-related stigma and access to care. At the end of the project, together with the photovoice participants and with our community partner Positive Women’s Network (PWN), we will organize a public exhibition of the photographs and stories that WLWH generate. The proposed project follows up on key research and advocacy priorities that were identified by WLWH, academics, AIDS support organizations, clinicians, and legal experts at a Roundtable event organized by the Gender and Sexual Health Initiative (GSHI) in collaboration with PWN and the Canadian HIV Legal Network in October, 2015.
$148,690.00
2016

UBC - Office of Research Services

Supportive Movement

This project aims to leverage physical activity to improve the quality of life for pregnant and parenting women on the DTES. Through participatory action research, we will create, implement, and evaluate trauma and violence informed physical activity programming and resources to address community identified barriers and develop practical tools for organizations to enhance programs and experiences for women. Addressing individual and systemic changes may support this population in being physically active, create greater social cohesion in the DTES, and improve health and overall quality of life for pregnant and parenting women and their children.
$149,988.00
2017

University of British Columbia School of Nursing

The Sanala Solution: Fostering Namgis Cultural Continuity for Health & Social Well-Being

From 2011-2014 the Sanala Research Team has been working to mobilize Indigenous knowledge and cultural tradition and teachings for community health promotion focusing specifically on youth self-esteem and Namgis Elder social isolation (VF HMER Grant UNR10-0825). The findings from this completed study confirm the critical place that cultural identity and continuity and language revitalization hold for Namgis youth and Elders. Our findings indicate that when cultural activities are woven into the everyday experiences of youth and Elders, both groups report a greater sense of wellness, balance and connection to the community. Elders describe lower rates of depression, social exclusion and chronic pain; youth describe a stronger and more positive identity and connection known to improve mental health and self esteem that act as protective factors against crime and addiction. These findings are the basis for the social innovation proposed for this project, entitled:"The Sanala Solution". The Sanala Solution, to be refined and tested in this project, fosters cultural continuity within the community; cultural continuity is integrally connected to the social inclusion, the most poorly defined and acted upon social determinant of health in the Canadian context. The Sanala Solution will study how to bring cultural continuity, language and inclusion to interface with Namgis health and social policy and programming to effect change that is community-driven and community-led.
$148,577.00
2015

University of British Columbia School of Social Work

Sexual Health Knowledge and Adults with Intellectual Disabilities: A Participatory Theatre Project

This project focuses on improving sexual health knowledge and positive sexuality among adults with intellectual disability(ID). Using community-based participatory methods, we will use mixed methods to create, produce and evaluate a participatory theatre project on sexual health, sexuality and ID. The origins of participatory theatre are in community development, arts and social movements. Practitioners of participatory theatre are committed to innovation, collaboration, capacity building and social transformation. As such, it is a well-suited approach for addressing the sexual rights of adults with ID who are often constructed as asexual and childlike and/or lacking sexual boundaries. Our participatory theatre will be developed using arts-based qualitative methods to identify what information and tools are needed to achieve successful sexual health and sexuality. These findings will inform the development of sexual health educational tools and resources as well as the creation, delivery and evaluation of three participatory theatre performances. These products are aimed at increasing knowledge about sexual health and sexuality for individuals with ID and aimed at minimizing barriers and social stigma associated with sexuality and ID. The performances will be delivered in New Westminster. It is anticipated that the performance will be replicated in other communities adding to the project's ongoing scope of influence to advance positive change related to sexuality and ID.
$142,702.00
2016

University of Victoria - Faculty of Human and Social Development

Mitigating mining-induced health impacts in Fort St. James and Nak'azdli, BC

This project will develop an intervention to mitigate the impacts of mine development on the health of two Northern communities, located near BC’s newest approved mine. The project is a unique collaboration, bridging the issues of health and mining engineering as well as an Aboriginal and a non-Aboriginal community (Nak'azdli and Fort St. James). The project will use a community-based participatory approach and knowledge translation to develop an intervention to maximize mining-related social, economic, and health benefits.
$140,000.00
2011

Vancouver Island University

Prevention and Preservation

This project aims to revitalize First Nations cultural practices and preserve cultural knowledge in a digital medium while increasing community research capacity. Aboriginal youth will document the knowledge of their elders on issues related to health, lifestyle and community history, and transmit this knowledge to other youth. The project will enhance intergenerational knowledge-sharing and connection to community while promoting healthy lifestyles. It will also enhance the capacity of youth to engage in digital media, create digital stories, and develop facilitation and research skills. The project’s long-term goal is to reduce the disproportionate number of individuals in First Nations communities suffering from diabetes and other chronic diseases.
$145,300.00
2011