Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

British Columbia's Women's Hospital and Health Centre Foundation

Changing Perceptions: Reimagining Sexual Assault to Better Support Survivors

In BC (2014) there were ~70,000 self-reported incidents of sexual assault (SA). In contrast only 2,341 SA were reported to police in the same year. Victim-blaming contributes to a culture where SA survivors’ credibility is undermined, evidenced by a reluctance to disclose or report to authorities. Low conviction rates and well-publicized SA case rulings reinforce public perceptions that minimize the severity of SA. Systemic re-victimization compounds survivors’ trauma and creates barriers that reduce willingness to disclose and access support services. Never has public awareness about SA in Canada been so high, creating an opportunity for changes in both public attitude and policy. The social innovation this research project will explore is how to stimulate a shift in the public discourse around SA toward less victim-blaming and more trauma-informed responses across multiple systems (health, justice and education). BCW and EVA BC will work with survivors, community-based organizations, and SA response systems, to investigate how power holders influence public perceptions of SA and how public perceptions of SA influence survivors’ willingness to disclose and access support. Knowledge generated from this project will facilitate safer environments for survivors to disclose and access support services and improve trauma-informed responses to SA across multiple sectors in BC.
$224,553.00
2016

Faculty of Medicine Digital Emergency Medicine

Evidence Supported Self-management Enablement and Cultural Engagement (ESSENCE)

In BC, doctors use evidence-based clinical guidelines when treating patients with chronic disease. BC is undergoing major health system changes, increasing patient involvement in health care decisions and self-management. For this reason, there is a unique opportunity for multicultural communities to identify recommendations for developing culturally-appropriate evidence-based guidelines, and creating accompanying patient guides. ESSENCE aims to understand barriers and facilitators for multicultural communities to meaningfully participate in health policy discussions, while identifying a pathway for cultural adaptation of clinical practice guidelines for doctors and patients.
$225,000.00
2017

UBC - Office of Research Services

Promoting access to care for women affected by intimate partner violence in the Downtown Eastside

The research project will test an innovative trauma informed outreach intervention to promote access to support services among highly isolated and vulnerable women experiencing intimate partner violence (IPV) in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside (DTES). Our team’s earlier research identified many women experienced limited access to anti-violence and other health and social services necessary to prevent IPV and reduce its deleterious effects (e.g., poverty, homelessness, HIV, mental illness). Although supports exist barriers remain due to isolation, control by partners, knowledge gaps about services, and negative care encounters in formal clinical settings. Outreach activities are needed to connect support workers with women in ways that are non-harmful or re-traumatizing. This reflects a growing body of international inter-disciplinary research calling for trauma-informed care and services for vulnerable populations. Other research with women experiencing IPV demonstrated trauma-informed outreach facilitated access and uptake of services with direct health and wellbeing benefits. Through a participatory action research (PAR) approach involving researchers, health and social service leaders/staff and women experiencing IPV we will build on the capacity of current services to learn if and how integrating a trauma informed approach to outreach services facilitates women’s connections with health and social services and improves service coordination to address the populations’ needs.
$224,840.00
2016

UBC - The Collaborating Centre for Prison Health

Trauma at the Root: Exploring Paths to Healing with Formerly Incarcerated Men

The majority of incarcerated men have experienced trauma in their lives. These trauma experiences are often at the root of substance use, mental illness, and/or violence that lead to involvement in the criminal justice system and can also negatively impact men’s ability to reintegrate into the community. However, there has been little done to explore how to support men in healing from trauma. This project will engage formerly incarcerated men in participatory health research to explore ways to improve trauma supports for both currently and formerly incarcerated men. The findings can be used develop trauma-informed approaches and influence policies and programming from the ground up.
$224,709.00
2017

University of British Columbia

Prevention Matters: Reducing the Diabetes Burden in the South Asian Community (Dr. Tricia Tang/Mr. Paul Bains)

In British Columbia (BC), compared to other ethnic groups, South Asians (SAs) have the highest incidence of diabetes and have a greater risk of developing macrovascular complications [1]. BC has the second largest population of SAs in Canada and is home to approximately 168,000 residents of this visible minority group, most of whom reside in the Greater Vancouver Area. Dr. Tang has been actively involved in community-level efforts to reduce diabetes-related health disparities in Vancouver. Community feedback from her current study investigating the use of peer support to improve diabetes management revealed a critical need for initiatives also targeting DIABETES PREVENTION. In direct response, this project aims to answer the question: What are the facilitators and barriers to lifestyle change for diabetes prevention in Vancouver's SA community? By partnering with an extensive network of Gurudwaras/Mandirs and equipping community members with core research skills, we will have the infrastructure and workforce to launch a lifestyle modification 'needs assessment' involving community-wide 'diabetes risk' screenings, follow-up 'risk reduction' feedback forums, dietary and exercise assessments, focus groups, semi-structured interviews, and a SA risk registry. Knowledge gained from this study will inform the development of culturally appropriate interventions specifically tailored to address the unique challenges of Vancouver's SA community. Research Team: Arun Kumar Garg, Fraser Health; Indpreet Dharni, UBC School of Medicine; Jatinder Singh Suden, VA Kesri Publishers; Paul Bains, Pacifica Partners; Harmeet Mundra, Fraser Health; Jatinder Jati Sidhu, Greenvale Enterprises; Dr. Parmjit Sohal; Tricia Tang, UBC School of Medicine
$227,419.00
2012

University of Northern British Columbia

From Front Door to Grocery Store: Getting seniors where they want to be (Dr. Greg Halseth/Ms. Leslie Groulx)

Rural BC is experiencing a rapidly aging population, and long-time residents are choosing to remain in their 'home' communities. Most of these communities face significant challenges in meeting the mobility needs of seniors, including harsh winters, poor physical infrastructure, and lack of services. Clearwater BC has made a commitment to becoming an age-friendly community. This project focuses on seniors mobility in the community. It emerged from a well-established partnership involving the CDI, the District of Clearwater and the Age-Friendly Community Committee, which is comprised of seniors organizations and organizations serving seniors. The research project will engage local seniors in an assessment of shopping and service areas, community facilities, walking routes, and transportation. These field sessions will be complemented by workshops to review, and increase awareness of, the issues. The project will also involve in-depth interviews to explore considerations such as safety, accessibility, affordability, inclusiveness, helpfulness, and respect. The final report from the project will include information and recommendations that can be used in planning and decision-making around mobility, an action plan, and the community mobility assessment tool that will be developed. This will be a resource that Clearwater can use into the future. It will also be distributed for use and adaptation by other communities in BC, Canada and beyond. Research Team: Greg Halseth, UNBC; Leslie Grouix, District of Clearwater; Donald Manson, UNBC; Neil Hanlon, UNBC; Dawn Hemingway, UNBC; Laura Ryser UNBC; Jessica Blewett, UNBC; Anne Hogan RDFFG;
$227,012.00
2012

Vancity Community Foundation

Making ends meet: realities of low wage work and working poverty and healthy communities in BC

How does low wage poverty affect health and wellbeing in Metro Vancouver and how will policy changes impact this. There are significant policy changes impending at multiple levels including provincial and federal poverty reduction plans potential changes to how health care is funded and delivered, changes to how child care is delivered at a provincial level as well as significant increases to the minimum wage. This research will help us evaluate the impacts of these policy changes on the health and wellness of individuals, families and communities.
$225,000.00
2017