Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

SPARC BC Society

Moving Towards Health: Promoting Accessible Built and Social Environments For Isolated Older Adults in Vancouver's West End (Co-lead Researchers: Karen Williams, SPARC BC; Eric Kowalski, West End Senior's Network Society)

Older adults who remain active in their community and regularly engage in physical activity report better health outcomes (Hanson et al, 2013). Conversely, older adults who are socially isolated are more likely to experience poor health (Dickens et al 2011). Our project, "Moving Towards Health: Promoting Accessible Built and Social Environments For Isolated Older Adults in Vancouver's West End", uses a senior-led community based participatory action research (CBPAR) approach to engage older adults in: a) research and promotion of accessible built and social environments in their neighborhood; b) the implementation of and research on a peer led intervention strategy that reaches out to isolated older adults to encourage them to become more active and socially connected. Phase 1 will lay the foundation for the CBPAR project and will involve forming an Advisory Committee; finalizing the research plan and completing a research ethics review process. Phase 2 will engage older adults in place-based qualitative research on the built and social environment in the West End including: a PhotoVoice process; a study of West End streets; the creation of age friendly pedestrian pathway maps. Phase 3 will consist of the development of a peer led outreach strategy to encourage isolated older adults to become more active in the West End. Phase 4 will take place alongside Phase 3 and will include researching the impact of the intervention. Phase 5 will consist of knowledge dissemination. Research Team: Jessica Smith, West End Senior's Network Society
$73,059.00
2014

University of British Columbia

Understanding smoking cessation behaviour in Vancouver's Chinese Communities (Dr. Mark Fitzgerald/Ms. Eliza Chang)

For numerous reasons, minority and immigrant communities in Canada may be at greater risk of smoking-related illnesses. This is particularly true among immigrants from Mandarin and Cantonese-speaking communities, where smoking rates remain disproportionately high. To date, millions have been spent on developing smoking cessation interventions, but their effectiveness in diverse cultural communities has been limited, likely because of a variety of social and cultural factors. Through a series of recent focus groups, representatives of Vancouver's Chinese communities have expressed a need for more culturally sensitive strategies to support smoking cessation in their community. We plan to address this need by using community-based participatory approaches to generate new knowledge about why smokers in Vancouver's Chinese communities continue to smoke and what their smoking cessation needs are. Our study will apply a community-academia coalition model, in which a Community Advisory Council (CAC) comprising of representatives from the Chinese community including smokers and non smokers, community key-informants (well-known socially influential/ respected individuals from the Mandarin-speaking and Cantonese-speaking communities), professional groups, and knowledge-users will oversee the project. Our findings will inform the creation of community-driven culturally appropriate resources aimed at reducing smoking rates (and therefore chronic lung & heart diseases) in these communities Research Team: Milan Khara, Tobacco Dependence Clinic; Iraj Poureslami, UBC; Stephem Lam, Lung Tumour Group; Maylene Fong, Evergreen; Ka Wai Cheung, UBC; Farzaneh Osati, Canadian Multicultural Health Promotion Society
$75,000.00
2012

University of British Columbia School of Nursing

Fostering Health & Human Rights: A Medical Legal Pilot Study (Judith Lynam, UBC/Kate Hodgon, Network of Inner City Community Services Society)

Our broad concern is to generate insights to foster child and family health equity. We are proposing to undertake research to to examine the ways structural violence operates in the day to day lives of children, youth & families living with marked social and material adversity in Vancouver's inner city. We propose to illustrate the impact of structural violence on health, child development & community well being and to use this analysis to inform the design of a Medical Legal Partnership (MLP). Structural violence refers to 'social structures-economic, political, legal...that stop individuals, groups and societies from reaching their full potential. The idea of structural violence is linked very closely to social injustice and the social machiner of oppression' (Farmer et al, 2004, 2006a,b). 'MLPs integrate legal services as a vital component of the healthcare team. Through direct service, transforming institutions and influencing policy change, MLPs address the non-medical, social determinants of health that have legal remedies' (MLP website). As such, this approach may assist the target community to address the systemic issues that contribute to the poor health profile of children and families. The research will provide the baseline data for an evidence-based approach for addressing structural violence and will inform the development of a strategy, a plan and a financial model. Research Team: Anthony Boardman, UBC Christine Loock, UBC; Lorine Scott, BC Children's Hospital;, Ronald G. Friesen, Continueing Legal Educaiton Society of BC; John Simpson, Legal Services Society
$71,257.00
2012

University of Victoria School of Social Work

Engaged research on implementations in response to overdose

This current proposal builds on a Vancouver Foundation Develop Grant (UNR15-0134) held by Wallace (with Pauly) in which we were immersed in community when drug overdose become a public health crisis and our results informing responses. Also, a NSERC Engage grant supported a unique partnership and the creation of a spectrometer drug testing instrument by the Co-investigator (Hore) with Vincent at STS Pharmacy. The advancement is novel due to the cost-effectiveness of the invention which allows for unprecedented scale-up and integration. Most recently, Wallace, Hore and Vincent were successful in an application to the Canadian Foundation for Pharmacy’s Innovation program to implement this technology, pilot drug checking and build capacity in Victoria BC. Our proposal pairs the piloting of this innovation in drug checking with community-based research through the partnership with AIDS Vancouver Island and its Street College program. Specifically, we will engage people who use drugs (PWUD) in research that can inform how drug checking can effectively be implemented and integrated in harm reduction. There is a lack of knowledge on many aspects of implementation such as; who may use or not use such services, what barriers exist to using the services, how individuals will respond to test results, how drug checking could impact the toxic illicit drug market, what opportunities drug checking may hold for reducing stigma, increasing access to supports, and develop relationships.
$70,000.00
2017

UVIC - School of Public Health & Social Policy

Reflecting Back, Looking Forward: Storytelling to Address HIV/AIDS Across British Columbia

HIV/AIDS persists despite advancements in HIV treatment and prevention due to persistent social inequities and stigma. In the early response to HIV/AIDS, affected communities banded together in fierce activism. Now, the earliest generation of HIV/AIDS survivors and their allies are passing away due to older age and suicide. We are loosing their stories and memories, which embody community resilience. Our novel community-based participatory oral history research project will document the experiences of these early HIV/AIDS survivors in a digital archive in order to preserve and share their cultural memories inter-generationally, re-invigorate prevention, and help eradicate HIV/AIDS in BC.
$75,000.00
2017