Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

British Columbia's Women's Hospital and Health Centre Foundation

Exploring Marginalized Women's Physical Activity and Inactivity in BC - Development Phase

BC Women’s is requesting seed funding to support, in partnership with Promotion Plus (PPlus), BCCEWH's development of a community-based research (CBR) and knowledge exchange project on the social determinants of physical activity and inactivity for marginalized women in BC. The need for this project developed from previous research, knowledge syntheses, interventions, and policy dialogues conducted by BCCEWH and PPlus, all of which identified the need for community-engaged explorations of how to improve marginalized women’s opportunities for physical activity and health promotion. This pilot project focuses on a series of community consultation processes to inform the development of a more comprehensive proposal. During this development stage, our goals are to: 1) establish a Provincial Advisory Committee (PAC), 2) identify three diverse communities as sites for Participatory Action Research (PAR) projects, and 3) formulate a Community of Practice (CoP) inclusive of diverse women, service providers, policy-makers, and researchers interested in ongoing province-wide knowledge development, mutual learning, and action. These activities will provide the necessary groundwork and relationship building with community-based stakeholders across BC to inform the submission of a full research proposal and undertake a more robust community-based participatory research project.
$10,000.00
2010

Community-Based Research Centre Society

Mapping the Intersects of Determinants and Development in Young Gay Men (Dr. Terry Trussler)

CBRC and HIM in cooperation with a network of collaborating agencies will develop and conduct the first Determinants Survey of gay men in BC in order to investigate how health determinants affect young gay men (YGM) ages 18 to 26 – a critical transition on the road to gay adulthood. According to the most recent HIV surveillance study conducted in Vancouver (Moore et al. 2010), 1 in 5 (20%) local gay youths will likely have an HIV infection by the time they reach 30 if current conditions continue. We wish to investigate how social factors have determined this outcome. A Young Investigators Team will receive operational training in all aspects of survey research including question development, sample recruitment and statistical analysis. The research activities will be nested within the day to day life of HIM, a community health organization offering counseling and STI testing services. The baseline data gained from this research will help inform future community level programs and social policy. This research would represent a breakthrough in knowledge development for gay men’s health.
$47,000.00
2010

Fraser Health Authority

Developing, implementing and evaluating falls prevetion programs with Aboriginal communities using participatory research methods (Dr. Sonia Singh)

The goal of this project is to develop a program of fall and injury prevention with Aboriginal communities located in Fraser Health using a participatory research approach. In BC, Aboriginal peoples are three times more likely to die of a fall compared to the general population. There is little research around fall prevention in Aboriginal communities in Canada. Feedback from FH Aboriginal community leaders and facilitators suggest that current fall prevention programs may not be suited to Aboriginal communities, where resources to act on recommendations are limited. There is a demonstrated need to work in full partnership with Aboriginal communities to develop a program of fall and injury prevention that is culturally relevant, effective and sustainable. Aboriginal leaders and older adults affected by fall related injuries will be involved as equal partners in all aspects of the research process including: developing relevant research questions, how these questions can respectfully be asked in the community, choosing appropriate research methods, collecting and interpreting data and developing strategies to act on the information learned. All data and results of the research will be owned by the Aboriginal communities involved and each community will have full control over the dissemination and action plans arising from this research. Through this research process we hope to achieve a lasting improvement in the health and well-being of Aboriginal older adults.
$246,465.00
2010

Society for Affordable Housing Education, Awareness and Development

Surviving not Thriving: The Systemic Barriers to Housing for Women Leaving Violence

The Shedding Light on the Barriers to Housing for Women Fleeing Violence Photovoice project (Shedding Light) was previously funded by the BC Medical Services Foundation and was successfully completed as of March 2010. This community-based, feminist participatory action research project was conducted in four communities across BC and engaged forty-five diverse women in photo-taking, interviews and focus groups in order to share their experiences of seeking housing after leaving violence. The purpose of the current proposed project is to professionally produce an advocacy report that maximizes the impact of photo- and text-based data generated by participants to effectively translate the knowledge generated from the Shedding Light project. The provincial and community-based organizations who partnered to facilitate Shedding Light will use this report in their advocacy and awareness-building efforts with the ultimate goal of addressing barriers to housing and improving access to housing for women who have left violent relationships.
$10,000.00
2010

The Arthritis Society, BC & Yukon

Development and pilot testing of a culturally relevant and family-based self-management program for First Nations people with arthritis (Dr. Allen Lehman)

The project we propose will: 1) Develop a culturally-sensitive and family-based program for First Nations (FN) people and family members across BC to improve self-management of arthritis. 2) Evaluate the program in FN communities to find out if it improves social support from family, coping skills, and self-efficacy at managing arthritis symptoms after six months; and, 3) Improve the capacity for care and research by FN people for FN people.
$160,000.00
2010

UBC - Office of Research Services

The Youth Injection Prevention YIP Project (Dr. Jane Buxton)

This project will disseminate the results of ten focus groups (FGs) and fifteen interviews with 60 street-involved youth aged 15-24 years in Metro Vancouver region, Nov 2009-March 2010. The FGs/interviews explored resiliency factors from the youth’s perspective, services available to reduce harms from drug use and perceived barriers to accessing these services. A team of 6 youth participated as co-researchers providing input into script design, co-facilitating FGs, performing data analysis and presenting at National conferences and local partnership meetings. These youth will continue to be involved in this project 1) Conduct 5 interactive community workshops (one in each health authority) to present the findings of the previous study to the local youth. These workshops will be led by one member of the YIP youth team, a research coordinator and a local youth from the respective health authority. 2) Feedback from youth participants at the workshops will be used to compare/contrast issues and experiences of local youth in their communities with those identified by Metro-Vancouver youth. 3) Create a DVD showing the process of youth engagement and empowerment. 4) Create a website, on-line forum and face book. 5) Produce a community friendly summary report and fact sheet re findings in Metro Vancouver and similarities and differences in other regions. The report will also be individualized for each community we visit so they can obtain some information specific to their needs.
$42,820.00
2010

University of British Columbia

A Participatory Approach to Developing Preventative Health Tools for BC Individuals with Lived Incarceration Experience (Dr. Ruth Martin)

Women and men who have been incarcerated suffer a high prevalence of illness, including chronic disease, cancer, infectious disease, mental illness and substance use. They tend to suffer perpetual social exclusion and are disproportionally affected by the socio-economic determinants for poor health, such as poverty, low health literacy and unstable housing. In 2005-7, women engaging in participatory health research inside a BC prison identified nine health goals as necessary for their successful re-integration into society. A follow-up study to determine barriers to the nine goals, experienced by women during their first 12 months following release from prison, suggests that incarcerated people have limited access to preventive health programs. International research with male prison leavers demonstrated similar results. In this community-based participatory research project, researchers from the UBC Collaborating Centre of Prison Health and Education (CCPHE) will partner with Women in2 Healing and Long Term Inmates Now in the Community to use participatory approaches to design and pilot preventive health tools/programs, and methods to evaluate them, with women and men with past incarceration experience who live in BC communities. It is hoped that BC health organisations and provincial and federal correctional institutions across Canada will adopt recommendations from this project, leading to sustainable improvements in preventive health for incarcerated men and women.
$201,307.00
2010

University of British Columbia Development Office

2009-2010 Vancouver Foundation First Nations Scholarship

Vancouver Foundation First Nations Scholarship: annual scholarship(s) for a graduate student(s) in the Health Sciences. Established by Dr. John H.V. Gilbert, for a First Nations student enrolled in a professional degree program in Health or Human Services. Students wishing to be considered for the award should apply to the Institute for Aboriginal Health, 429 - 2194 Health Sciences Mall, UBC by the November 30 deadline. The award is made by nomination of the selection committee, Institute for Aboriginal Health.
$5,000.00
2010

University of British Columbia School of Nursing

Mobilizing Local "Know-How" for Community Health Action in a Rural Aboriginal Context (Dr. Helen Brown)

This project builds on established relationships between researchers at UBC and the Namgis First Nation in Alert Bay. Alert Bay is a community that grapples with growing unemployment rates, high incidence of alcohol and drug abuse, high rates of chronic illness, and intergenerational trauma. Over the past century this community has lost many traditional practices and much of the use of the Kwak'wala language, and social isolation is a growing problem. Our work in Alert Bay has shown the inseparability of culture and health - findings that support the development of culturally rooted, community-based health actions to address health inequities and optimize health. This participatory project aims to create relevant and sustainable health actions that attend to the social and cultural origins of health priorities identified by the community. The goals of this project are to enlist local 'know-how' to design and test the effectiveness of health actions in two interrelated domains: (1) to mitigate the health impacts of Elders' experiences of social isolation through cultural renewal and Kwak'wala language education, and (2) to enhance mental health and well-being through strengthening cultural identity and community connection. Elders and youth have been identified as priority groups; therefore the project will design and measure of effectiveness of health action with these populations. Research team: Dr. Colleen Varcoe, UBC School of Nursing; Gladys McPherson, UBC School of Nursing; Georgia Cook, Namgis Health Centre; Ruby Peterson, Communtiy Counsellor; Vera Newman, UBC Communtiy Researcher; Wayne Peterson, Gwa'sala-'Nakwaxda'x Principal; Barbara Cramer, UBC Community Researcher;
$235,236.00
2010

Examining the Organization of Healthcare for Aging Adults with Intellectual Disabilities in British Columbia: A Critical Interpretive Policy Analysis (Dr. Jennifer Baumbusch)

Between 0.5 and 3% of adults have Intellectual Disabilities (ID) (Boyd, 1997; Crawford, 2008; Statistics Canada, 2008). Within British Columbia (BC) and beyond, there is growing recognition that the healthcare needs of aging adults with ID will not be met by the current system (Janicki et al., 2002; Ouellette-Kuntz, 2007; Temkin, 2009). This study grew out of previous research about the healthcare needs of aging adults with ID in BC (Baumbusch & Phinney, 09/10). The study brings together researchers, Community Living organizations, healthcare providers and recipients of care to examine the implementation of healthcare policy into practice. In BC, Health Services for Community Living (HSCL) is a provincial policy, introduced following the closure of institutions for adults with ID, which specifically addresses the healthcare needs of this population. The aim of this study is to increase understanding of potential policy-practice gaps in the implementation of HSCL and other relevant policies. We will collect data through policy analysis, focus groups, and key informant interviews. In order to gain urban and rural perspectives, data will be collected in the three health authorities. The focus groups and interviews will explore the translation of policies into practice. Findings from this research will generate new knowledge about healthcare for aging adults with ID and will lead to recommendations for policy and service renewal in this area.
$19,466.00
2010

University of Victoria - Faculty of Human and Social Development

Knowledge Translation of Barriers to Safe Drinking Water in BC Aboriginal Communities

This application is to fund an extension to work on issues related to access to safe drinking water that has been completed by Darlene Sanderson PhD within six separate Aboriginal communities in remote areas of British Columbia. The project is one of community-focused participatory research directly involving members of the communities whose health is affected by lack of access to safe water. For example, one of the communities in which a workshop was held has been on a boil water advisory for the last sixteen years. Activities: The funds will be used to capture the outcomes of six workshops conducted within each of the Aboriginal communities.Dr. Sanderson will analyze data drawn from the workshops and then compare findings from the analysis to findings from a literature search and an environmental scan in order to identify high impact actions that could be taken at local levels to address particular issues relating to access to safe water. Findings will be recorded in reports to each of the six Indigenous communities and made available to them. This stage of the project will build on the momentum generated during the workshops within each of the communities; develop greater understanding of issues around health and access to safe water;and provide community members with the opportunity to take a direct stake in the process of moving knowledge to action.
$10,000.00
2010

UVIC Faculty of Social Sciences

Improving Food Security, Food Safety, and Health in Remote BC Communities (Dr. Aleck Ostry)

We will evaluate a new system of infrastructure support, licensing and training for slaughter providers which have been especially adapted for rural and remote communities. This system, enacted in 2010 by the Ministry of Healthy Living and Sport, is expected to improve both food safety and food security in these communities. This program of infrastructure support and upgrading of food production and processing skills is unique and requires evaluation to determine whether or not it works and, because it is a potential model for improving food security in rural and remote communities for other types of food and in jurisdictions in other parts of BC and Canada and other countries.
$61,913.50
2010