Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

Atira Women's Resource Society

Antiretroviral Therapy and Women: Assessing Barriers to Adherence (Ms. Janice Abbott/Dr. Cari Miller)

The project idea originated when it was observed that women living with HIV accessing emergency shelter services had gaps in antiretroviral therapy (ART) treatment adherence. Adherence is essential to the maintenance of health among HIV-positive people and decreased risk of transmission to sexual and drug use partners. In BC, HIV-positive women exhibit significantly lower adherence to ART than men even when known confounders, such as injection drug use, are controlled for. This study would qualitatively explore suboptimal adherence to ART among women by using community-based participatory research involving focus groups, open-ended interviews, and innovative methods such as digital storytelling. This funding will be used to hire a peer research assistant who will be integral to the project, assisting with the development of topic guides, conducting the research with women, analyzing the data and disseminating the new knowledge. Knowledge gained will identify women’s barriers to adherence and be used to develop women-specific services to support individual and community-wide health. Research Team: Cathy Puskas, Phd Student; Elysia Bourne, Atira
$22,938.00
2012

British Columbia's Women's Hospital and Health Centre Foundation

Why Midwifery Care? Women exploring access to high quality maternity care (Dr. Saraswathi Vedam/Ms. Ganga Jolicoeur)

In 2012 the BC government allocated funds to expand admissions to UBC Midwifery and to build sustainable rural midwifery services. These policy changes were driven by maternity care provider shortages, and supported by the documented efficacy, patient satisfaction, and cost-effectiveness of midwifery care. However, utilization of midwives is not equally distributed across the BC population. It appears that patient experience, public awareness, and regional availability are all factors that may affect demand and access to midwifery care. Research Team: Ruth E. Martin-Misener, Family Physician/UBC; Catriona Hippman, UBC/BC Women's Hospital; Kathrin Stoll, UBC; Laura Schummers, Research Consultant; Nora Timmerman, UBC; Kelly Murphy, UBC; Dana Thordarson, Psychology The objectives for this project emerged from two community consultations. Some midwifery patients reported enthusiasm for shared decision-making; others felt stigmatized when their choices were perceived to be in conflict with the community standard of care. As a result interest in midwifery care may be modulated by family and professional attitudes. Community midwives and rural women described populations that could benefit from but were currently underserved by midwives, and suspected that multiple barriers to access exist for vulnerable women. Hence, our multi-stakeholder team (patients, community service leaders and researchers) proposes that the overarching goal of our study is to identify factors that affect women's access to the full spectrum of maternity care options. Findings will inform a knowledge translation plan aimed at improving access to high quality maternity services, particularly among underserved and vulnerable women.
$159,676.00
2012

Canadian Centre For Policy Alternatives

Addressing Inequities at the Intersection of Health and Climate Change (Co-lead researchers: Marc Lee, CCPA; Tim Takaro, SFU

This proposal is for a $10,000 development grant to explore how health, equity and climate change can be addressed in an integrated way that benefits vulnerable populations and communities. Since 2009, CCPA has been leading, in partnership with the University of British Columbia, a major academic-community research and engagement collaboration called the Climate Justice Project: Paths to an Equitable and Sustainable BC Economy (CJP). This proposed research project emerged out of a growing interest from multiple CJP partners to explore the potential for climate change mitigation and adaption strategies to also address determinants of health and health inequities. While a lot of research recognizes healthy environments and a healthy climate are important determinants of health, a more fulsome look at how climate change adaptation and mitigation strategies impact health inequities is needed. We are proposing to use this development grant to accomplish three broad goals: i) conduct preliminary research and review of existing, BC-specific, policy links between climate justice and health; ii) build capacities for collaboration and connectedness within and across diverse communities and sectors such as social justice, health, environmental and academic sectors and (iii) define specific research questions to be explored further in a collaborative community based research project. Reserach Team Member: Kerri Klien, Provincial Facilitator
$10,000.00
2012

Positive Living Society of British Columbia

Stigma and access to health information in certain marginalized HIV communities (Mr. R. Paul Kerston/Dr. Mario Brondani)

HIV stigma may prevent people from being timely diagnosed and engaging in life-saving care. It may also prevent those who are HIV positive from seeking health educational information and services, particularly if they are from marginalized communities. To minimize stigma and to engage HIV-positive individuals in utilizing educational and support services, we need a good understanding of the roots of stigma and of the resources these community members need. Stigma can have many forms and be manifested in different manners. Despite the advance of readily available information and media, stigma remains held by the lay public and experienced by HIV marginalized individuals from Aboriginal communities and those who are refugee/immigrants, as the focus of this proposal. Within a community-based participatory research framework (CBPR), this proposed 2-year project will explore inductively the roots of stigma as experienced by HIV-positive members from these two marginalized communities, gathered in group discussions, and as held by lay individuals from the general public who are HIV-negative, gathered individually. The focus groups will be peer-led by volunteer trainees. Through collaborative thematic analysis from group discussions and interviews, this CBPR will enable us to identify the factors contributing to stigma and the educational and service needs of these marginalized communities. It will also inform the development of strategies to address and minimize stigma.
$94,425.00
2012

UBC - Department of Psychology

Promoting Healthy Aging through Intergenerational Programming (Dr. Christiane Hoppman/Ms. Sandra Petrozzi)

This planning grant takes an innovative approach to health promotion in an aging population by capitalizing on the important role of social factors. Specifically, we will develop community-based intergenerational programs that harvest older adults' skills and needs to leave a lasting legacy while at the same time increasing leisure time physical activity such as "purposeful walking" as well as providing cognitive stimulation. Therefore, intergenerational programs have the potential for high "buy-in" because they contribute to older adults' purpose in life and simultaneously foster health-promoting behaviors that are well known to contribute to healthy aging. The project stems from a need to develop sustainable programs that will promote the health of a growing population of older adults, while supporting the social and academic development of children from immigrant and low-income families. This project will explore facilitators and barriers to intergenerational programming in the local context, from the perspectives of program administrators, parents of young children, and older adult program participants. We will do this through focus group discussions, a symposium, and participatory research methods. We will then use the knowledge gained to develop feasible, evidence-based implementation strategies for intergenerational programming that will, in turn, form the basis of a larger program implementation project. Research Team: Dr. Christiane Hoppman/Ms. Sandra Petrozzi
$4,945.00
2012

University of British Columbia

We Want to be Healthy: A Community Engagement Strategy to Enhance Foreign-Born, Older Adult Health and Mobility (Dr. Joanie Sims-Gould)

SVNH has been serving the needs of older adults since 1977 and has developed a strong foundation of services, supports and community engagement activities. In an ongoing effort to serve older adults, SVNH is currently leading the Seniors Hub project. The goal of the Seniors Hub project (Hub) is to create a sustainable network of programs and services to support older adults at the neighbourhood level. Through consultations with SVNH staff, the South Vancouver Seniors' Advisory Council (SAC), local seniors centres/organizations in the SVNH catchment and older adults, priorities for the Hub include understanding the needs and reaching out to under-served foreign-born populations in South East Vancouver (e.g. Vietnamese, Filipino, and Tamil seniors). In response to these identified priorities, we are particularly interested in better understanding the health and mobility needs of the under-served foreign-born older adults living in the SVNH catchment. We know that there are important and significant associations between the design of neighbourhoods, where older adults live and their ability to move within their neighbourhood. The goal of this project will be to better understand the specific health and mobility needs of foreign-born older adults in the SVNH catchment.
$153,087.00
2012

Understanding smoking cessation behaviour in Vancouver's Chinese Communities (Dr. Mark Fitzgerald/Ms. Eliza Chang)

For numerous reasons, minority and immigrant communities in Canada may be at greater risk of smoking-related illnesses. This is particularly true among immigrants from Mandarin and Cantonese-speaking communities, where smoking rates remain disproportionately high. To date, millions have been spent on developing smoking cessation interventions, but their effectiveness in diverse cultural communities has been limited, likely because of a variety of social and cultural factors. Through a series of recent focus groups, representatives of Vancouver's Chinese communities have expressed a need for more culturally sensitive strategies to support smoking cessation in their community. We plan to address this need by using community-based participatory approaches to generate new knowledge about why smokers in Vancouver's Chinese communities continue to smoke and what their smoking cessation needs are. Our study will apply a community-academia coalition model, in which a Community Advisory Council (CAC) comprising of representatives from the Chinese community including smokers and non smokers, community key-informants (well-known socially influential/ respected individuals from the Mandarin-speaking and Cantonese-speaking communities), professional groups, and knowledge-users will oversee the project. Our findings will inform the creation of community-driven culturally appropriate resources aimed at reducing smoking rates (and therefore chronic lung & heart diseases) in these communities Research Team: Milan Khara, Tobacco Dependence Clinic; Iraj Poureslami, UBC; Stephem Lam, Lung Tumour Group; Maylene Fong, Evergreen; Ka Wai Cheung, UBC; Farzaneh Osati, Canadian Multicultural Health Promotion Society
$75,000.00
2012

Prevention Matters: Reducing the Diabetes Burden in the South Asian Community (Dr. Tricia Tang/Mr. Paul Bains)

In British Columbia (BC), compared to other ethnic groups, South Asians (SAs) have the highest incidence of diabetes and have a greater risk of developing macrovascular complications [1]. BC has the second largest population of SAs in Canada and is home to approximately 168,000 residents of this visible minority group, most of whom reside in the Greater Vancouver Area. Dr. Tang has been actively involved in community-level efforts to reduce diabetes-related health disparities in Vancouver. Community feedback from her current study investigating the use of peer support to improve diabetes management revealed a critical need for initiatives also targeting DIABETES PREVENTION. In direct response, this project aims to answer the question: What are the facilitators and barriers to lifestyle change for diabetes prevention in Vancouver's SA community? By partnering with an extensive network of Gurudwaras/Mandirs and equipping community members with core research skills, we will have the infrastructure and workforce to launch a lifestyle modification 'needs assessment' involving community-wide 'diabetes risk' screenings, follow-up 'risk reduction' feedback forums, dietary and exercise assessments, focus groups, semi-structured interviews, and a SA risk registry. Knowledge gained from this study will inform the development of culturally appropriate interventions specifically tailored to address the unique challenges of Vancouver's SA community. Research Team: Arun Kumar Garg, Fraser Health; Indpreet Dharni, UBC School of Medicine; Jatinder Singh Suden, VA Kesri Publishers; Paul Bains, Pacifica Partners; Harmeet Mundra, Fraser Health; Jatinder Jati Sidhu, Greenvale Enterprises; Dr. Parmjit Sohal; Tricia Tang, UBC School of Medicine
$227,419.00
2012

Burn survivor quality of life in British Columbia: challenges and opportunities (Dr. Anthony Papp/Ms. Lisa Lacamell)

The objective of this research is to identify the fundamental barriers and facilitators to recovery and reintegration back into work and society among burn survivors living in British Columbia. Considerable research has shown that burn-related injury is a significant contributor to both short- and long-term physical, cognitive, behavioral, and emotional impairments that have significant consequences on individuals, their families, and society at-large. However, we have very limited information about what factors influence the recovery and reintegration of BC’s burn survivor community despite the fact that burn-related injury is a leading cause of injury morbidity across the province. This gap significantly reduces the ability to understand the type of contexts that help populations recover following injury. In recent years, advancements in trauma care have led to tremendous decreases in mortality and reduced hospital length of stay. Unfortunately, the consequences of these improvements are that patients must now face many responsibilities for their care on their own. As such, it is important to obtain information about the resources and social environments that fundamentally contribute to recovery. As many injury survivors likely face similar barriers to recovery, it is important that these information is drawn from narratives from individual survivors to identify how best to strengthen local resource infrastructures. Research Team: Nathaniel Bell, UBC; Heidi Cave, Author; Anthony Papp, BC Professional Firefighters' Burn Unit; Lisa Lacamell, BCPFF Burn Fund
$63,178.00
2012

University of British Columbia College of Health Disciplines

Improving care for vulnerable populations through their participation in the education of health professionals (Dr. Angela Towle)

Vulnerable and marginalized populations have problems with access to health care, communication with health professionals and receipt of patient-centred care that goes beyond a bio-medical approach. These problems can be addressed by active involvement of people in the community, who are ‘experts by lived experience’, in the education of health professionals. However, there are major institutional and cultural barriers to the inclusion of vulnerable people as educators, including different understandings of knowledge and expertise, power imbalances, discrimination and stigma, and lack of trust. We propose a knowledge interaction research project that will influence educational policy and practice. The goal is to make the authentic and autonomous voice and expertise of the patient a core part of the education of health professionals. We propose a 3-year inclusive and iterative community-based participatory research project that will inform i) the development of a mechanism for the community to engage with the university for the purpose of influencing health professional education; and ii) the development, implementation and evaluation of an educational model that leads to sustained participation by vulnerable and marginalized populations in the education of health professionals. The project will benefit the community through its ability to influence its future health and social care, and benefit the university in fulfilling its mandate for socially accountable education. Research Team: Scott Graham SPARC; William Godolphin UBC; Cheryl hewitt, North Shore Health Board; Angela Towle UBC
$130,441.00
2012

University of British Columbia School of Nursing

Fostering Health & Human Rights: A Medical Legal Pilot Study (Judith Lynam, UBC/Kate Hodgon, Network of Inner City Community Services Society)

Our broad concern is to generate insights to foster child and family health equity. We are proposing to undertake research to to examine the ways structural violence operates in the day to day lives of children, youth & families living with marked social and material adversity in Vancouver's inner city. We propose to illustrate the impact of structural violence on health, child development & community well being and to use this analysis to inform the design of a Medical Legal Partnership (MLP). Structural violence refers to 'social structures-economic, political, legal...that stop individuals, groups and societies from reaching their full potential. The idea of structural violence is linked very closely to social injustice and the social machiner of oppression' (Farmer et al, 2004, 2006a,b). 'MLPs integrate legal services as a vital component of the healthcare team. Through direct service, transforming institutions and influencing policy change, MLPs address the non-medical, social determinants of health that have legal remedies' (MLP website). As such, this approach may assist the target community to address the systemic issues that contribute to the poor health profile of children and families. The research will provide the baseline data for an evidence-based approach for addressing structural violence and will inform the development of a strategy, a plan and a financial model. Research Team: Anthony Boardman, UBC Christine Loock, UBC; Lorine Scott, BC Children's Hospital;, Ronald G. Friesen, Continueing Legal Educaiton Society of BC; John Simpson, Legal Services Society
$71,257.00
2012

University of Northern British Columbia

Investigating bottlenecks and barriers to cancer care in Haida Gwaii (Dr. Robert Olson/Dr.Tracy Morton)

The project idea is in response to a specific request to the principal investigator from health care providers, on behalf of the people in Haida Gwaii, to address difficulties concerning cancer diagnosis and care in isolated Aboriginal communities. Not only does geographical isolation make it difficult to access tertiary services, but social and cultural factors form potential barriers to accessing cancer services. The health care providers identified a need for a comprehensive electronic database of their entire population, which will enable them to participate in health care improvements and research. A research team, comprised of experts in family practice, Aboriginal health, information technology, oncology, epidemiology and biostatistics will identify all patients with a histologically confirmed diagnosis of cancer in Haida Gwaii and collect demographic data, family and personal medical histories and lifestyle information for each patient. All data will be populated in a database that will allow for analysis to identify common delays in care, survival analysis and statistical comparisons of Aboriginal vs. non-Aboriginal patients for each outcome. This project has the potential to improve Aboriginal care in Haida Gwaii and other Aboriginal remote communities by identifying bottlenecks and barriers in care and advocating for measures to address these issues; through education and resource allocation.
$57,002.00
2012

From Front Door to Grocery Store: Getting seniors where they want to be (Dr. Greg Halseth/Ms. Leslie Groulx)

Rural BC is experiencing a rapidly aging population, and long-time residents are choosing to remain in their 'home' communities. Most of these communities face significant challenges in meeting the mobility needs of seniors, including harsh winters, poor physical infrastructure, and lack of services. Clearwater BC has made a commitment to becoming an age-friendly community. This project focuses on seniors mobility in the community. It emerged from a well-established partnership involving the CDI, the District of Clearwater and the Age-Friendly Community Committee, which is comprised of seniors organizations and organizations serving seniors. The research project will engage local seniors in an assessment of shopping and service areas, community facilities, walking routes, and transportation. These field sessions will be complemented by workshops to review, and increase awareness of, the issues. The project will also involve in-depth interviews to explore considerations such as safety, accessibility, affordability, inclusiveness, helpfulness, and respect. The final report from the project will include information and recommendations that can be used in planning and decision-making around mobility, an action plan, and the community mobility assessment tool that will be developed. This will be a resource that Clearwater can use into the future. It will also be distributed for use and adaptation by other communities in BC, Canada and beyond. Research Team: Greg Halseth, UNBC; Leslie Grouix, District of Clearwater; Donald Manson, UNBC; Neil Hanlon, UNBC; Dawn Hemingway, UNBC; Laura Ryser UNBC; Jessica Blewett, UNBC; Anne Hogan RDFFG;
$227,012.00
2012

Bridging the Cs: Community, Connectedness, and Collaborative partnerships to improve the Cardio-metabolic health of individuals with enduring mental illness. (Dr. Candida Graham/Ms. Nansi Long)

This project aims to answer the question: How do we help clients with enduring mental illness [EMI] achieve and maintain healthier lifestyles, decreasing their risks of cardio-metabolic disorders, through community, connectedness and collaboration? This project will not only empower clients to take action but also provide new research data on effective methods to overcome barriers, such as stigma, to improve health behaviours in clients with EMI. Using the themes of understanding, self-determination & client generated solutions the researchers will engage in an iterative process with this vulnerable & disadvantaged community to shape SMART (Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Realistic & Timely) health initiatives. The project will sequentially: 1.Invite engagement from clients in the review of preliminary study data 2.Explore client's internal & external factors, which lead to positive change in lifestyle 3.Shape & implement community lead health initiatives 4.Evaluate the initiative outcomes. Primary outcomes will be quantitative measures of change in health behaviours, work & social adjustment, community connectedness, quality of life, measures of self-determination & the characteristics of initiatives the community shape. The main hypothesis is that in line with self-determination theory, the empowerment of clients will lead to better engagement and continuance with lifestyle changes. Research Team: Crystal Rollings UNBC/UBC; Dr. Brenda Griffiths, Lesley Anderson, United Way; Lynn Smoliak, BC Schizophrenia Society; Sarah de leeuw, UNBC; Megan Davies, York University, Diane Purvey, Kwantlen Polytechnic University; Candida Graham, UNBC; Nansi Long, BC Schizophrenia Society
$236,762.00
2012