Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

UBC - Faculty of Land and Food Systems

Sharing our Wisdom: A Holistic Aboriginal Health Initiative (Co-lead Researchers: Dr. Teresa Howell, Research Manager, Institute for Aboriginal Health, UBC and Ms. Tanya Gomes, Clinical Practice Initiatives, Lead-Aboriginal Health, Vancouver Coastal Health)

This project originated out of discussions & research with the urban Aboriginal community which taught us that knowledge translation is important. Therefore, an underlying theme of this project is to understand the effectiveness of traditional Aboriginal healing knowledge when addressing health inequities experienced by Aboriginal peoples. We will be community-guided in developing 7 holistic health circles (HC) to: engage Aboriginal participants in learning about Aboriginal health practices; facilitate a healthier life context for participants; work towards the prevention of risk factors for health issues & validate and create a better understanding of the utility of traditional healing practices. The research question will be 2fold: 1) Do Aboriginal traditional health practices provide a more meaningful way of addressing health strategies for Aboriginal peoples? 2) How does the participation in health circles, based on Aboriginal traditional knowledge, impact the health of Aboriginal peoples? We will gather information through focus groups & interviews with participants’ about their health knowledge & practices before & after HC attendance; document their experiences of HCs & illuminate how they perceive it has affected their overall health & view of traditional health practices. Knowledge translation is also important; thus, we will also share the knowledge that we gain from this project with & between urban Aboriginal & non-Aboriginal organizations, peoples, & communities. Research Team members: Dr. Lee Brown, Team Member, Director of the Institute for Aboriginal Health, UBC
$165,438.00
2013

UBC - Office of Research Services

Supportive Movement

This project aims to leverage physical activity to improve the quality of life for pregnant and parenting women on the DTES. Through participatory action research, we will create, implement, and evaluate trauma and violence informed physical activity programming and resources to address community identified barriers and develop practical tools for organizations to enhance programs and experiences for women. Addressing individual and systemic changes may support this population in being physically active, create greater social cohesion in the DTES, and improve health and overall quality of life for pregnant and parenting women and their children.
$149,988.00
2017

Promoting access to care for women affected by intimate partner violence in the Downtown Eastside

The research project will test an innovative trauma informed outreach intervention to promote access to support services among highly isolated and vulnerable women experiencing intimate partner violence (IPV) in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside (DTES). Our team’s earlier research identified many women experienced limited access to anti-violence and other health and social services necessary to prevent IPV and reduce its deleterious effects (e.g., poverty, homelessness, HIV, mental illness). Although supports exist barriers remain due to isolation, control by partners, knowledge gaps about services, and negative care encounters in formal clinical settings. Outreach activities are needed to connect support workers with women in ways that are non-harmful or re-traumatizing. This reflects a growing body of international inter-disciplinary research calling for trauma-informed care and services for vulnerable populations. Other research with women experiencing IPV demonstrated trauma-informed outreach facilitated access and uptake of services with direct health and wellbeing benefits. Through a participatory action research (PAR) approach involving researchers, health and social service leaders/staff and women experiencing IPV we will build on the capacity of current services to learn if and how integrating a trauma informed approach to outreach services facilitates women’s connections with health and social services and improves service coordination to address the populations’ needs.
$224,840.00
2016

The Youth Injection Prevention YIP Project (Dr. Jane Buxton)

This project will disseminate the results of ten focus groups (FGs) and fifteen interviews with 60 street-involved youth aged 15-24 years in Metro Vancouver region, Nov 2009-March 2010. The FGs/interviews explored resiliency factors from the youth’s perspective, services available to reduce harms from drug use and perceived barriers to accessing these services. A team of 6 youth participated as co-researchers providing input into script design, co-facilitating FGs, performing data analysis and presenting at National conferences and local partnership meetings. These youth will continue to be involved in this project 1) Conduct 5 interactive community workshops (one in each health authority) to present the findings of the previous study to the local youth. These workshops will be led by one member of the YIP youth team, a research coordinator and a local youth from the respective health authority. 2) Feedback from youth participants at the workshops will be used to compare/contrast issues and experiences of local youth in their communities with those identified by Metro-Vancouver youth. 3) Create a DVD showing the process of youth engagement and empowerment. 4) Create a website, on-line forum and face book. 5) Produce a community friendly summary report and fact sheet re findings in Metro Vancouver and similarities and differences in other regions. The report will also be individualized for each community we visit so they can obtain some information specific to their needs.
$42,820.00
2010

UBC - Okanagan

A community ­based intervention to support belonging among the S. S. Indian­-Canadian diaspora

Project background/need: The idea for this project arose from prior research in the South Similkameen (SS) focused on understanding the experiences of belonging and mental well-being among Indian­ Canadian residents. During this pilot work, we interviewed and consulted with local residents and stakeholders. Key barriers to belonging and wellbeing that Indian-Canadians reported included 1. limited participation in local decision-making; 2. challenges in accessing culturally-appropriate services and; 3. multi-generational tensions hindering community and familial bonding. Potential knowledge/ action: Our project aim is to develop a collaborative planning strategy to launch a community-­based intervention that can address these issues and support a greater sense of belonging and wellbeing among the S.S. Indian-­Canadian diaspora. Jointly with local Indian-Canadian residents and other community partners, we will work to: 1. develop consensus on a priority area that can build a sense of belonging and wellbeing; 2. map out skills and strengths that can help us develop a strategy to address this priority area and; 3. build capacity among local residents to implement and evaluate such an intervention. These activities can change social systems by changing "basic routines" (e.g. decision­ making processes) and beliefs (e.g. assuming services can be 'one size fits all') enabling us to address root causes of exclusion and poor mental health affecting rural immigrant populations.
$9,958.00
2015

UBC - School of Population & Public Health

Supporting the Achievement of Health Goals with Formerly Incarcerated Men

The John Howard Society of Canada (JHSC) and UBCs Collaborating Centre for Prison Health and Education (CCPHE) share a deep commitment to improving the health of previously incarcerated individuals. Incarcerated populations suffer vast health inequities compared with the general Canadian population, and 90% of incarcerated individuals are male. This community-based participatory research project aims to answer the question: what are the facilitators and barriers to achieving health and successful reintegration for men leaving federal correctional institutions in BC? All members of the project advisory committee (PAC), including academic, community, and individuals with lived incarceration experience, will work together in the design, execution, analysis, and sharing of research findings. This participatory project will build employment and educational capacity among individuals with incarceration experience, thus addressing a known barrier to reintegration. In the longer-term, this project has the potential to: enhance understanding of the health trajectories for men as they leave prison; create new knowledge that will enhance the current body of academic health literature; facilitate the development of health recommendations and resources for prison-specific organizations regarding what additional services they might facilitate for their clients; and, develop policy recommendations for Correctional Services Canada (CSC) regarding their health discharge planning procedures.
$234,734.50
2014

UBC - The Collaborating Centre for Prison Health

Growing Great Kids Out of Homelessness

Children experiencing homelessness have poorer outcomes when compared to other children, their mothers often struggle with social isolation, and there is a strong link to entering the child welfare system. Growing Great Kids Out of Homelessness will address this issue and seek to influence system change by creating a collaborative, multi-sectoral, peer-led participatory research project. Through the opportunity to experience themselves as co-creators of safe, supportive environments, homeless women and children can restore their health and well-being in an environment of dignity that offers women increased agency and engagement with others, while keeping families intact.
$10,000.00
2017

Trauma at the Root: Exploring Paths to Healing with Formerly Incarcerated Men

The majority of incarcerated men have experienced trauma in their lives. These trauma experiences are often at the root of substance use, mental illness, and/or violence that lead to involvement in the criminal justice system and can also negatively impact men’s ability to reintegrate into the community. However, there has been little done to explore how to support men in healing from trauma. This project will engage formerly incarcerated men in participatory health research to explore ways to improve trauma supports for both currently and formerly incarcerated men. The findings can be used develop trauma-informed approaches and influence policies and programming from the ground up.
$224,709.00
2017

United Chinese Community Enrichment Services Society (S.U.C.C.E.S.S.)

Stories of Our Ancestors: Intergenerational Trauma Among Chinese-Canadian Families

The traumatic narratives of Chinese immigration to Canada and its impact on future generations are mostly unknown. The silence of these migration experiences may be related to surviving collective trauma. Understanding the stigma, shame and fear of Chinese-Canadians who migrated to escape persecution, imprisonment and torture will assist Canadian health care providers to develop strategies to understand and treat pre- and post-migration trauma. Intergenerational trauma is an important construct for understanding the mental health of survivors and their families. We know that individuals and families who have suffered through significant collective traumas are unlikely to obtain professional support. Likewise, Chinese-Canadians underutilize mental health services and there is significant shame and stigma with regards to mental illness in this population. As intergenerational trauma among Chinese people is unexplored in the literature, the social innovation idea is to create a dialogue between older generations and younger generations to work across the divide of silence to bring understanding to family members by breaking the silence of the past. Once the social implications are understood we will be able to devise health care strategies to reduce the stigma and shame of seeking mental health care within this population. As intergenerational trauma is considered to be a broad social determinant of health, it has implications for education, employment, and general well-being.
$10,000.00
2015

University of British Columbia

Jump Step - A participatory approach to physical activity & mental wellness (Co-lead researchers Dr. Joanie Sims-Gould, Assistant Professor UBC and Ron Remick, Medical Director, MDA Psychiatric Urgent)

Note: We have adjusted the proposal title to avoid confusion with Step-by-Step, our previous pilot study of the same name. Anxiety/mood disorders can have devastating effects. They contribute more to the global burden of disease than all cancers combined(i) and 5 of the 10 leading causes of disability worldwide are mental or nervous disorders.(ii) Members of the Jump Step collaboration have both experienced and witnessed the destructive nature of these conditions. As mental health clients or Wellness Partners as MDABC psychiatrists, as investigators, we recognize that current psychiatric treatments are often limited to psychological and/or pharmaceutical interventions. These approaches are useful but do not necessarily 1) address the person nor her/his mental health challenges within a holistic context; nor 2) focus on wellness as the primary outcome (as opposed to disease control). Wellness Partners see a need to investigate the relationship between physical activity (PA) and mental illness (we prefer mental wellness). How can we support adults, suffering from anxiety/mood disorders to engage in PA as a mechanism for promoting and sustaining holistic wellness and healthy lifestyles? Collectively, as wellness partners and practitioners/psychiatrists, knowledge users, and key stakeholders, we will design, implement, and evaluate a PA promotion study based on a community-based needs assessment & identified barriers/facilitators to PA, and the success of our pilot. Research Team: Karim Miran-Khan (UBC), David Adams (Mobility BC), Sarah Lusina-Furst (CIHR), Martin Addison (Mood Disorders Association of BC), Jennifer Davis (Post Doctorate Fellow), Christiane Hoppmann (UBC), Michael Delaney (Lawyer), Sara Vazirian (Mobility BC)
$236,996.00
2014

We Want to be Healthy: A Community Engagement Strategy to Enhance Foreign-Born, Older Adult Health and Mobility (Dr. Joanie Sims-Gould)

SVNH has been serving the needs of older adults since 1977 and has developed a strong foundation of services, supports and community engagement activities. In an ongoing effort to serve older adults, SVNH is currently leading the Seniors Hub project. The goal of the Seniors Hub project (Hub) is to create a sustainable network of programs and services to support older adults at the neighbourhood level. Through consultations with SVNH staff, the South Vancouver Seniors' Advisory Council (SAC), local seniors centres/organizations in the SVNH catchment and older adults, priorities for the Hub include understanding the needs and reaching out to under-served foreign-born populations in South East Vancouver (e.g. Vietnamese, Filipino, and Tamil seniors). In response to these identified priorities, we are particularly interested in better understanding the health and mobility needs of the under-served foreign-born older adults living in the SVNH catchment. We know that there are important and significant associations between the design of neighbourhoods, where older adults live and their ability to move within their neighbourhood. The goal of this project will be to better understand the specific health and mobility needs of foreign-born older adults in the SVNH catchment.
$153,087.00
2012

Understanding smoking cessation behaviour in Vancouver's Chinese Communities (Dr. Mark Fitzgerald/Ms. Eliza Chang)

For numerous reasons, minority and immigrant communities in Canada may be at greater risk of smoking-related illnesses. This is particularly true among immigrants from Mandarin and Cantonese-speaking communities, where smoking rates remain disproportionately high. To date, millions have been spent on developing smoking cessation interventions, but their effectiveness in diverse cultural communities has been limited, likely because of a variety of social and cultural factors. Through a series of recent focus groups, representatives of Vancouver's Chinese communities have expressed a need for more culturally sensitive strategies to support smoking cessation in their community. We plan to address this need by using community-based participatory approaches to generate new knowledge about why smokers in Vancouver's Chinese communities continue to smoke and what their smoking cessation needs are. Our study will apply a community-academia coalition model, in which a Community Advisory Council (CAC) comprising of representatives from the Chinese community including smokers and non smokers, community key-informants (well-known socially influential/ respected individuals from the Mandarin-speaking and Cantonese-speaking communities), professional groups, and knowledge-users will oversee the project. Our findings will inform the creation of community-driven culturally appropriate resources aimed at reducing smoking rates (and therefore chronic lung & heart diseases) in these communities Research Team: Milan Khara, Tobacco Dependence Clinic; Iraj Poureslami, UBC; Stephem Lam, Lung Tumour Group; Maylene Fong, Evergreen; Ka Wai Cheung, UBC; Farzaneh Osati, Canadian Multicultural Health Promotion Society
$75,000.00
2012

Prevention Matters: Reducing the Diabetes Burden in the South Asian Community (Dr. Tricia Tang/Mr. Paul Bains)

In British Columbia (BC), compared to other ethnic groups, South Asians (SAs) have the highest incidence of diabetes and have a greater risk of developing macrovascular complications [1]. BC has the second largest population of SAs in Canada and is home to approximately 168,000 residents of this visible minority group, most of whom reside in the Greater Vancouver Area. Dr. Tang has been actively involved in community-level efforts to reduce diabetes-related health disparities in Vancouver. Community feedback from her current study investigating the use of peer support to improve diabetes management revealed a critical need for initiatives also targeting DIABETES PREVENTION. In direct response, this project aims to answer the question: What are the facilitators and barriers to lifestyle change for diabetes prevention in Vancouver's SA community? By partnering with an extensive network of Gurudwaras/Mandirs and equipping community members with core research skills, we will have the infrastructure and workforce to launch a lifestyle modification 'needs assessment' involving community-wide 'diabetes risk' screenings, follow-up 'risk reduction' feedback forums, dietary and exercise assessments, focus groups, semi-structured interviews, and a SA risk registry. Knowledge gained from this study will inform the development of culturally appropriate interventions specifically tailored to address the unique challenges of Vancouver's SA community. Research Team: Arun Kumar Garg, Fraser Health; Indpreet Dharni, UBC School of Medicine; Jatinder Singh Suden, VA Kesri Publishers; Paul Bains, Pacifica Partners; Harmeet Mundra, Fraser Health; Jatinder Jati Sidhu, Greenvale Enterprises; Dr. Parmjit Sohal; Tricia Tang, UBC School of Medicine
$227,419.00
2012

Burn survivor quality of life in British Columbia: challenges and opportunities (Dr. Anthony Papp/Ms. Lisa Lacamell)

The objective of this research is to identify the fundamental barriers and facilitators to recovery and reintegration back into work and society among burn survivors living in British Columbia. Considerable research has shown that burn-related injury is a significant contributor to both short- and long-term physical, cognitive, behavioral, and emotional impairments that have significant consequences on individuals, their families, and society at-large. However, we have very limited information about what factors influence the recovery and reintegration of BC’s burn survivor community despite the fact that burn-related injury is a leading cause of injury morbidity across the province. This gap significantly reduces the ability to understand the type of contexts that help populations recover following injury. In recent years, advancements in trauma care have led to tremendous decreases in mortality and reduced hospital length of stay. Unfortunately, the consequences of these improvements are that patients must now face many responsibilities for their care on their own. As such, it is important to obtain information about the resources and social environments that fundamentally contribute to recovery. As many injury survivors likely face similar barriers to recovery, it is important that these information is drawn from narratives from individual survivors to identify how best to strengthen local resource infrastructures. Research Team: Nathaniel Bell, UBC; Heidi Cave, Author; Anthony Papp, BC Professional Firefighters' Burn Unit; Lisa Lacamell, BCPFF Burn Fund
$63,178.00
2012

A Participatory Approach to Developing Preventative Health Tools for BC Individuals with Lived Incarceration Experience (Dr. Ruth Martin)

Women and men who have been incarcerated suffer a high prevalence of illness, including chronic disease, cancer, infectious disease, mental illness and substance use. They tend to suffer perpetual social exclusion and are disproportionally affected by the socio-economic determinants for poor health, such as poverty, low health literacy and unstable housing. In 2005-7, women engaging in participatory health research inside a BC prison identified nine health goals as necessary for their successful re-integration into society. A follow-up study to determine barriers to the nine goals, experienced by women during their first 12 months following release from prison, suggests that incarcerated people have limited access to preventive health programs. International research with male prison leavers demonstrated similar results. In this community-based participatory research project, researchers from the UBC Collaborating Centre of Prison Health and Education (CCPHE) will partner with Women in2 Healing and Long Term Inmates Now in the Community to use participatory approaches to design and pilot preventive health tools/programs, and methods to evaluate them, with women and men with past incarceration experience who live in BC communities. It is hoped that BC health organisations and provincial and federal correctional institutions across Canada will adopt recommendations from this project, leading to sustainable improvements in preventive health for incarcerated men and women.
$201,307.00
2010

University of British Columbia College of Health Disciplines

Improving care for vulnerable populations through their participation in the education of health professionals (Dr. Angela Towle)

Vulnerable and marginalized populations have problems with access to health care, communication with health professionals and receipt of patient-centred care that goes beyond a bio-medical approach. These problems can be addressed by active involvement of people in the community, who are ‘experts by lived experience’, in the education of health professionals. However, there are major institutional and cultural barriers to the inclusion of vulnerable people as educators, including different understandings of knowledge and expertise, power imbalances, discrimination and stigma, and lack of trust. We propose a knowledge interaction research project that will influence educational policy and practice. The goal is to make the authentic and autonomous voice and expertise of the patient a core part of the education of health professionals. We propose a 3-year inclusive and iterative community-based participatory research project that will inform i) the development of a mechanism for the community to engage with the university for the purpose of influencing health professional education; and ii) the development, implementation and evaluation of an educational model that leads to sustained participation by vulnerable and marginalized populations in the education of health professionals. The project will benefit the community through its ability to influence its future health and social care, and benefit the university in fulfilling its mandate for socially accountable education. Research Team: Scott Graham SPARC; William Godolphin UBC; Cheryl hewitt, North Shore Health Board; Angela Towle UBC
$130,441.00
2012

University of British Columbia Development Office

2009-2010 Vancouver Foundation First Nations Scholarship

Vancouver Foundation First Nations Scholarship: annual scholarship(s) for a graduate student(s) in the Health Sciences. Established by Dr. John H.V. Gilbert, for a First Nations student enrolled in a professional degree program in Health or Human Services. Students wishing to be considered for the award should apply to the Institute for Aboriginal Health, 429 - 2194 Health Sciences Mall, UBC by the November 30 deadline. The award is made by nomination of the selection committee, Institute for Aboriginal Health.
$5,000.00
2010

University of British Columbia School of Nursing

The Sanala Solution: Fostering Namgis Cultural Continuity for Health & Social Well-Being

From 2011-2014 the Sanala Research Team has been working to mobilize Indigenous knowledge and cultural tradition and teachings for community health promotion focusing specifically on youth self-esteem and Namgis Elder social isolation (VF HMER Grant UNR10-0825). The findings from this completed study confirm the critical place that cultural identity and continuity and language revitalization hold for Namgis youth and Elders. Our findings indicate that when cultural activities are woven into the everyday experiences of youth and Elders, both groups report a greater sense of wellness, balance and connection to the community. Elders describe lower rates of depression, social exclusion and chronic pain; youth describe a stronger and more positive identity and connection known to improve mental health and self esteem that act as protective factors against crime and addiction. These findings are the basis for the social innovation proposed for this project, entitled:"The Sanala Solution". The Sanala Solution, to be refined and tested in this project, fosters cultural continuity within the community; cultural continuity is integrally connected to the social inclusion, the most poorly defined and acted upon social determinant of health in the Canadian context. The Sanala Solution will study how to bring cultural continuity, language and inclusion to interface with Namgis health and social policy and programming to effect change that is community-driven and community-led.
$148,577.00
2015

Fostering Health & Human Rights: A Medical Legal Pilot Study (Judith Lynam, UBC/Kate Hodgon, Network of Inner City Community Services Society)

Our broad concern is to generate insights to foster child and family health equity. We are proposing to undertake research to to examine the ways structural violence operates in the day to day lives of children, youth & families living with marked social and material adversity in Vancouver's inner city. We propose to illustrate the impact of structural violence on health, child development & community well being and to use this analysis to inform the design of a Medical Legal Partnership (MLP). Structural violence refers to 'social structures-economic, political, legal...that stop individuals, groups and societies from reaching their full potential. The idea of structural violence is linked very closely to social injustice and the social machiner of oppression' (Farmer et al, 2004, 2006a,b). 'MLPs integrate legal services as a vital component of the healthcare team. Through direct service, transforming institutions and influencing policy change, MLPs address the non-medical, social determinants of health that have legal remedies' (MLP website). As such, this approach may assist the target community to address the systemic issues that contribute to the poor health profile of children and families. The research will provide the baseline data for an evidence-based approach for addressing structural violence and will inform the development of a strategy, a plan and a financial model. Research Team: Anthony Boardman, UBC Christine Loock, UBC; Lorine Scott, BC Children's Hospital;, Ronald G. Friesen, Continueing Legal Educaiton Society of BC; John Simpson, Legal Services Society
$71,257.00
2012

Mobilizing Local "Know-How" for Community Health Action in a Rural Aboriginal Context (Dr. Helen Brown)

This project builds on established relationships between researchers at UBC and the Namgis First Nation in Alert Bay. Alert Bay is a community that grapples with growing unemployment rates, high incidence of alcohol and drug abuse, high rates of chronic illness, and intergenerational trauma. Over the past century this community has lost many traditional practices and much of the use of the Kwak'wala language, and social isolation is a growing problem. Our work in Alert Bay has shown the inseparability of culture and health - findings that support the development of culturally rooted, community-based health actions to address health inequities and optimize health. This participatory project aims to create relevant and sustainable health actions that attend to the social and cultural origins of health priorities identified by the community. The goals of this project are to enlist local 'know-how' to design and test the effectiveness of health actions in two interrelated domains: (1) to mitigate the health impacts of Elders' experiences of social isolation through cultural renewal and Kwak'wala language education, and (2) to enhance mental health and well-being through strengthening cultural identity and community connection. Elders and youth have been identified as priority groups; therefore the project will design and measure of effectiveness of health action with these populations. Research team: Dr. Colleen Varcoe, UBC School of Nursing; Gladys McPherson, UBC School of Nursing; Georgia Cook, Namgis Health Centre; Ruby Peterson, Communtiy Counsellor; Vera Newman, UBC Communtiy Researcher; Wayne Peterson, Gwa'sala-'Nakwaxda'x Principal; Barbara Cramer, UBC Community Researcher;
$235,236.00
2010

Examining the Organization of Healthcare for Aging Adults with Intellectual Disabilities in British Columbia: A Critical Interpretive Policy Analysis (Dr. Jennifer Baumbusch)

Between 0.5 and 3% of adults have Intellectual Disabilities (ID) (Boyd, 1997; Crawford, 2008; Statistics Canada, 2008). Within British Columbia (BC) and beyond, there is growing recognition that the healthcare needs of aging adults with ID will not be met by the current system (Janicki et al., 2002; Ouellette-Kuntz, 2007; Temkin, 2009). This study grew out of previous research about the healthcare needs of aging adults with ID in BC (Baumbusch & Phinney, 09/10). The study brings together researchers, Community Living organizations, healthcare providers and recipients of care to examine the implementation of healthcare policy into practice. In BC, Health Services for Community Living (HSCL) is a provincial policy, introduced following the closure of institutions for adults with ID, which specifically addresses the healthcare needs of this population. The aim of this study is to increase understanding of potential policy-practice gaps in the implementation of HSCL and other relevant policies. We will collect data through policy analysis, focus groups, and key informant interviews. In order to gain urban and rural perspectives, data will be collected in the three health authorities. The focus groups and interviews will explore the translation of policies into practice. Findings from this research will generate new knowledge about healthcare for aging adults with ID and will lead to recommendations for policy and service renewal in this area.
$19,466.00
2010

University of British Columbia School of Occupational & Environmental Hygiene

Community Gardening as a Path to Well-Being (Co-lead Researchers: Dr. Melinda Suto, Assistant Professor, UBC and Mr. Darrell Burnham, Executive Director, Coast Foundation Society)

The project arose as the co-leads discussed what people living with mental illness could do to improve their health and well-being. The research questions are: 1) How does participation in a community garden affect the well-being and social connections of people living in supported housing? 2) How do we engage people in a physical activity (community gardening) that encourages better health and social connections for people living in supported housing? Research and policy reports support community gardening as a catalyst for positive health; clinicians confirm the need for this type of non-medical strategy. Participants will join the advisory group; do data collection and analysis; use findings to guide changes; create and deliver knowledge translation products. Participants’ involvement in community gardening will improve physical health and access to fresh produce, decrease isolation and foster community engagement with others. There are opportunities to learn skills, share knowledge and mentor; this may encourage people to try new activities. Findings from this project will educate the public, create connections with like-minded people and shape policy decisions on future gardens. Broader knowledge contributions will occur in academic publications, which can provide evidence for the recovery model in mental health. We anticipate expanding community gardens in the region and helping people move from the margins of society to the mainstream, through a popular activity. Research Team members: Mr. Rudy Small, Research Team member and Ms. Cathy Taylor, Research Team member.
$85,149.00
2013

University of British Columbia School of Social Work

Sexual Health Knowledge and Adults with Intellectual Disabilities: A Participatory Theatre Project

This project focuses on improving sexual health knowledge and positive sexuality among adults with intellectual disability(ID). Using community-based participatory methods, we will use mixed methods to create, produce and evaluate a participatory theatre project on sexual health, sexuality and ID. The origins of participatory theatre are in community development, arts and social movements. Practitioners of participatory theatre are committed to innovation, collaboration, capacity building and social transformation. As such, it is a well-suited approach for addressing the sexual rights of adults with ID who are often constructed as asexual and childlike and/or lacking sexual boundaries. Our participatory theatre will be developed using arts-based qualitative methods to identify what information and tools are needed to achieve successful sexual health and sexuality. These findings will inform the development of sexual health educational tools and resources as well as the creation, delivery and evaluation of three participatory theatre performances. These products are aimed at increasing knowledge about sexual health and sexuality for individuals with ID and aimed at minimizing barriers and social stigma associated with sexuality and ID. The performances will be delivered in New Westminster. It is anticipated that the performance will be replicated in other communities adding to the project's ongoing scope of influence to advance positive change related to sexuality and ID.
$142,702.00
2016

Sexual Health Knowledge and Intellectual Disability (Dr. Rachelle Hole, UBC / Angela Clancy, Family Support Institute)

Individuals with intellectual disability (ID) face unique challenges in relation to sexual health and realizing their sexual identity and expression. A lack of appropriate sexual education is evident. This lack of education increases threats of disease, abuse, and/or mental health issues, especially for those who do not conform to heterosexual norms. The FSI and the CIC are working to foster dialogue, develop resources and support leadership to address this community identified need. In this project, FSI and the CIC will partner with key stakeholders (e.g., Spectrum Society, Langley Association), centring the voices, experiences and leadership of individuals with ID (self advocates), to build understanding, awareness and capacity about sexual health, sexual expression and sexual diversity for individuals with ID, families and service providers. Within a participatory frame, we will engage with self advocates and allies to identify gaps in sexual health knowledge; develop knowledge and community resources for promoting positive sexual health and sexuality; and, engage stakeholders to develop and implement knowledge translation strategies. The research questions are: 1) What are self advocates' experiences of sexual health knowledge and education? 2) What information is needed to achieve successful sexual health education and positive sexual expression? 3) What strategies do self advocates and allies identify as most effective to promote positive sexual health and sexuality?
$10,000.00
2014

University of Northern British Columbia

Investigating bottlenecks and barriers to cancer care in Haida Gwaii (Dr. Robert Olson/Dr.Tracy Morton)

The project idea is in response to a specific request to the principal investigator from health care providers, on behalf of the people in Haida Gwaii, to address difficulties concerning cancer diagnosis and care in isolated Aboriginal communities. Not only does geographical isolation make it difficult to access tertiary services, but social and cultural factors form potential barriers to accessing cancer services. The health care providers identified a need for a comprehensive electronic database of their entire population, which will enable them to participate in health care improvements and research. A research team, comprised of experts in family practice, Aboriginal health, information technology, oncology, epidemiology and biostatistics will identify all patients with a histologically confirmed diagnosis of cancer in Haida Gwaii and collect demographic data, family and personal medical histories and lifestyle information for each patient. All data will be populated in a database that will allow for analysis to identify common delays in care, survival analysis and statistical comparisons of Aboriginal vs. non-Aboriginal patients for each outcome. This project has the potential to improve Aboriginal care in Haida Gwaii and other Aboriginal remote communities by identifying bottlenecks and barriers in care and advocating for measures to address these issues; through education and resource allocation.
$57,002.00
2012

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