Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

University of Northern British Columbia

From Front Door to Grocery Store: Getting seniors where they want to be (Dr. Greg Halseth/Ms. Leslie Groulx)

Rural BC is experiencing a rapidly aging population, and long-time residents are choosing to remain in their 'home' communities. Most of these communities face significant challenges in meeting the mobility needs of seniors, including harsh winters, poor physical infrastructure, and lack of services. Clearwater BC has made a commitment to becoming an age-friendly community. This project focuses on seniors mobility in the community. It emerged from a well-established partnership involving the CDI, the District of Clearwater and the Age-Friendly Community Committee, which is comprised of seniors organizations and organizations serving seniors. The research project will engage local seniors in an assessment of shopping and service areas, community facilities, walking routes, and transportation. These field sessions will be complemented by workshops to review, and increase awareness of, the issues. The project will also involve in-depth interviews to explore considerations such as safety, accessibility, affordability, inclusiveness, helpfulness, and respect. The final report from the project will include information and recommendations that can be used in planning and decision-making around mobility, an action plan, and the community mobility assessment tool that will be developed. This will be a resource that Clearwater can use into the future. It will also be distributed for use and adaptation by other communities in BC, Canada and beyond. Research Team: Greg Halseth, UNBC; Leslie Grouix, District of Clearwater; Donald Manson, UNBC; Neil Hanlon, UNBC; Dawn Hemingway, UNBC; Laura Ryser UNBC; Jessica Blewett, UNBC; Anne Hogan RDFFG;
$227,012.00
2012

Bridging the Cs: Community, Connectedness, and Collaborative partnerships to improve the Cardio-metabolic health of individuals with enduring mental illness. (Dr. Candida Graham/Ms. Nansi Long)

This project aims to answer the question: How do we help clients with enduring mental illness [EMI] achieve and maintain healthier lifestyles, decreasing their risks of cardio-metabolic disorders, through community, connectedness and collaboration? This project will not only empower clients to take action but also provide new research data on effective methods to overcome barriers, such as stigma, to improve health behaviours in clients with EMI. Using the themes of understanding, self-determination & client generated solutions the researchers will engage in an iterative process with this vulnerable & disadvantaged community to shape SMART (Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Realistic & Timely) health initiatives. The project will sequentially: 1.Invite engagement from clients in the review of preliminary study data 2.Explore client's internal & external factors, which lead to positive change in lifestyle 3.Shape & implement community lead health initiatives 4.Evaluate the initiative outcomes. Primary outcomes will be quantitative measures of change in health behaviours, work & social adjustment, community connectedness, quality of life, measures of self-determination & the characteristics of initiatives the community shape. The main hypothesis is that in line with self-determination theory, the empowerment of clients will lead to better engagement and continuance with lifestyle changes. Research Team: Crystal Rollings UNBC/UBC; Dr. Brenda Griffiths, Lesley Anderson, United Way; Lynn Smoliak, BC Schizophrenia Society; Sarah de leeuw, UNBC; Megan Davies, York University, Diane Purvey, Kwantlen Polytechnic University; Candida Graham, UNBC; Nansi Long, BC Schizophrenia Society
$236,762.00
2012

University of Victoria

Development Phase - Community Food Literacy Participatory Action Research Project (Co-lead Researchers: Dr. Trevor Hancock, Professor, UVIC and Ms. Linda Geggie, Coordinator, Capital Region Food and Agriculture Initiatives Roundtable).

The Development Grant will help us to bring together academic and community partners to develop the Community Food Literacy PAR Project proposal. Community practitioners have identified the need to build community food literacy. We define food literacy to be the ability to access, understand and evaluate information related to food (e.g., how to select and prepare food), including knowledge of where food comes from, its environmental impact and the connection to food through culture and society. The project will advance our understanding of how to coordinate and strengthen community food literacy programs that empower participants to increase control over, and improve their health. A multi-sector advisory group will support the project team to engage community agencies to contribute to and refine, our working definition of food literacy. We will share the information gathered through the Community Food Feasibility Study (appendix 2) in regards to current practices, gaps and opportunities to build food literacy. We will ask the community to reflect on the findings, refine and prioritize research questions, and identify the best methods to gather, share, and take action on what we learn together. In addition at the BC Food Systems Network Gathering we will determine the best methods for knowledge translation so that we can effectively share our findings. Finally we will develop a research proposal and formalize partnerships to move the project forward. Research Team members: Ms. Wanda Martin, Co-Researcher, Mr. Aaren Topley, Research Team member, and Ms. Joan Wharf Higgins, Research Student support.
$10,000.00
2013

University of Victoria - Faculty of Human and Social Development

Indigenous, Participatory, Culturally-Grounded Arts-Informed Research Insititute 2015 (Researchers: N/A)

Indigenous, Participatory, Culturally-Grounded Arts-Informed Research Insititute 2015 (Research Team: N/A)
$10,000.00
2014

Mitigating mining-induced health impacts in Fort St. James and Nak'azdli, BC

This project will develop an intervention to mitigate the impacts of mine development on the health of two Northern communities, located near BC’s newest approved mine. The project is a unique collaboration, bridging the issues of health and mining engineering as well as an Aboriginal and a non-Aboriginal community (Nak'azdli and Fort St. James). The project will use a community-based participatory approach and knowledge translation to develop an intervention to maximize mining-related social, economic, and health benefits.
$140,000.00
2011

Knowledge Translation of Barriers to Safe Drinking Water in BC Aboriginal Communities

This application is to fund an extension to work on issues related to access to safe drinking water that has been completed by Darlene Sanderson PhD within six separate Aboriginal communities in remote areas of British Columbia. The project is one of community-focused participatory research directly involving members of the communities whose health is affected by lack of access to safe water. For example, one of the communities in which a workshop was held has been on a boil water advisory for the last sixteen years. Activities: The funds will be used to capture the outcomes of six workshops conducted within each of the Aboriginal communities.Dr. Sanderson will analyze data drawn from the workshops and then compare findings from the analysis to findings from a literature search and an environmental scan in order to identify high impact actions that could be taken at local levels to address particular issues relating to access to safe water. Findings will be recorded in reports to each of the six Indigenous communities and made available to them. This stage of the project will build on the momentum generated during the workshops within each of the communities; develop greater understanding of issues around health and access to safe water;and provide community members with the opportunity to take a direct stake in the process of moving knowledge to action.
$10,000.00
2010

University of Victoria School of Social Work

Engaged research on implementations in response to overdose

This current proposal builds on a Vancouver Foundation Develop Grant (UNR15-0134) held by Wallace (with Pauly) in which we were immersed in community when drug overdose become a public health crisis and our results informing responses. Also, a NSERC Engage grant supported a unique partnership and the creation of a spectrometer drug testing instrument by the Co-investigator (Hore) with Vincent at STS Pharmacy. The advancement is novel due to the cost-effectiveness of the invention which allows for unprecedented scale-up and integration. Most recently, Wallace, Hore and Vincent were successful in an application to the Canadian Foundation for Pharmacy’s Innovation program to implement this technology, pilot drug checking and build capacity in Victoria BC. Our proposal pairs the piloting of this innovation in drug checking with community-based research through the partnership with AIDS Vancouver Island and its Street College program. Specifically, we will engage people who use drugs (PWUD) in research that can inform how drug checking can effectively be implemented and integrated in harm reduction. There is a lack of knowledge on many aspects of implementation such as; who may use or not use such services, what barriers exist to using the services, how individuals will respond to test results, how drug checking could impact the toxic illicit drug market, what opportunities drug checking may hold for reducing stigma, increasing access to supports, and develop relationships.
$70,000.00
2017

UVIC - Centre for Addictions Research

Preventing and Reducing Harms of Substance Use in Homeless Shelter Programs

Our idea will engage both people who experience homelessness and problematic substance and staff who provide shelter services to look at harm reduction strategies to respond to substance use in emergency shelter programs in a new way. Currently, these settings struggle with contradictory practices, policies and beliefs. Emergency shelters provide low-threshold shelter to those who are currently engaged in substance use as well as barring substance use by residents to support those who seek to avoid substance use while also being a site for some harm reduction services but not others. The issues are complex and the shelter population is diverse and both shelter staff and residents have identified the need to do things differently.
$10,000.00
2015

The Role of Transitional Housing in Health and Recovery from Homelessness

Although transitional housing has been shown to be effective in helping people move from homelessness to housed, little is known about staff and residents’ perspectives on the role of transitional housing programs or how experiences may vary with gender and history of substance abuse. This project will gather data on the factors in transitional housing that foster or inhibit transitions out of homelessness for men and women and those with or without problematic substance abuse. It will also provide evidence on how, or if, transitional housing can or should be supported as an intervention in response to homelessness in Canada.
$65,014.00
2011

UVIC - School of Public Health & Social Policy

Reflecting Back, Looking Forward: Storytelling to Address HIV/AIDS Across British Columbia

HIV/AIDS persists despite advancements in HIV treatment and prevention due to persistent social inequities and stigma. In the early response to HIV/AIDS, affected communities banded together in fierce activism. Now, the earliest generation of HIV/AIDS survivors and their allies are passing away due to older age and suicide. We are loosing their stories and memories, which embody community resilience. Our novel community-based participatory oral history research project will document the experiences of these early HIV/AIDS survivors in a digital archive in order to preserve and share their cultural memories inter-generationally, re-invigorate prevention, and help eradicate HIV/AIDS in BC.
$75,000.00
2017

UVIC Faculty of Social Sciences

Improving Food Security, Food Safety, and Health in Remote BC Communities (Dr. Aleck Ostry)

We will evaluate a new system of infrastructure support, licensing and training for slaughter providers which have been especially adapted for rural and remote communities. This system, enacted in 2010 by the Ministry of Healthy Living and Sport, is expected to improve both food safety and food security in these communities. This program of infrastructure support and upgrading of food production and processing skills is unique and requires evaluation to determine whether or not it works and, because it is a potential model for improving food security in rural and remote communities for other types of food and in jurisdictions in other parts of BC and Canada and other countries.
$61,913.50
2010

UVIC Office of Community-Based Research

Mitigating potential mining-induced health impacts in ?Esdilagh First Nation Co-Researchers: Dr. Aleck Ostry, Professor and Canada research Chair, UVIC and Dr. Janis Shandro, Technical Advisor of Mining and Health, Esdilagh First Nation

The ?Esdilagh First Nation has over 40 years experience with the Gibraltar Mine, a mine that was permitted prior to environmental assessment requirements. This mine in North Central British Columbia began operation in 1972 and has since obtained approval to double its production capacity, again with no environmental assessment required. ?Esdilagh are very concerned about the practices of the Gibraltar mine; surface water contamination (heavy metals) has been recently identified in waterways near the mine site and ?Esdliagh people are very concerned about the health of local wildlife, and are unsure if these traditional food sources are safe to eat because of heavy metal contamination. It is an overall objective of this project to build health knowledge and research capacity within these communities in the areas of wildlife health, community health and mining. in partnership with ?Esdilagh First Nation to: 1. Develop a framework and basic data to conduct a health impact assessment on the community in relation to the Gibraltar mine with a focus on wildlife as a traditional food source and culturally appropriate determinants of health; 2. Determine potential impacts, if any, to community and wildlife health that may have arisen in relation to effluent from the Gibraltar Mine; and 3. Develop a plan to prevent future and mitigate present impacts on community and wildlife health that may be related to the mine Research Team: Dr. Doron Lis, Graduate Student
$195,672.00
2014

Vancity Community Foundation

Making ends meet: realities of low wage work and working poverty and healthy communities in BC

How does low wage poverty affect health and wellbeing in Metro Vancouver and how will policy changes impact this. There are significant policy changes impending at multiple levels including provincial and federal poverty reduction plans potential changes to how health care is funded and delivered, changes to how child care is delivered at a provincial level as well as significant increases to the minimum wage. This research will help us evaluate the impacts of these policy changes on the health and wellness of individuals, families and communities.
$225,000.00
2017

Vancouver Coastal Health Authority

Community Based Research Centre for Concurrent Disorders (Researchers: N/A)

This project will develop methods to measure clinical outcomes via the collection, analysis and interpretation of quantitative and qualitative data gathered at Stepping Stones Concurrent Disorders Service primarily, and then sister agencies on the North Shore. That being said, it is hope that this grant will enable the investigators at the Stepping Stones to conduct outreach and field work throughout the North Shore in order to engage the many stakeholder who work with individuals struggling with concurrent disorders. The end result of this project is to create a Community Based Research Centre for Concurrent Disorders. (Research Team: N/A)
$3,575.00
2014

Vancouver Island University

Prevention and Preservation

This project aims to revitalize First Nations cultural practices and preserve cultural knowledge in a digital medium while increasing community research capacity. Aboriginal youth will document the knowledge of their elders on issues related to health, lifestyle and community history, and transmit this knowledge to other youth. The project will enhance intergenerational knowledge-sharing and connection to community while promoting healthy lifestyles. It will also enhance the capacity of youth to engage in digital media, create digital stories, and develop facilitation and research skills. The project’s long-term goal is to reduce the disproportionate number of individuals in First Nations communities suffering from diabetes and other chronic diseases.
$145,300.00
2011

Vancouver Island University Foundation

Physical Literacy Development Grant (Co-lead Researchers: Dr. Paige Fisher, Vancouver Island University, and Mr. Drew Cooper, PacificSport - Vancouver Island)

Complications from our sedentary lifestyles are seen as the main culprit behind this life expectancy decline. Too much screen time, an unfounded culture of fear that deem it unsafe to allow our children to play outdoors unsupervised and the absence of the simple acts of walking or riding one's bike to school are just some of the contributing issues. However it is the loss of elementary school physical education specialists that is probably the most significant factor in this demise. As a result, the fundamental skills necessary to be able to fully participate in physical activity are seen to be lacking in a growing number of children and young adults to the point where their physical health is in jeopardy. For many children, the lack of fundamental skills makes even basic physical activities an unpleasant experience thereby contributing to an even more sedentary society and putting increased pressure on an already burgeoning health care system. Just as literacy and numeracy are deemed essential tools for success in the 21st century, there are fractions within the health, education, and recreation sectors who maintain that enhancing a community's appreciation for physical literacy is essential to stem the advancing obesity epidemic.
$10,000.00
2013

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