Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

Association of Neighbourhood Houses of British Columbia

New Neighbors Project - Newcomer Youth for Real Representation

This project will invite and support newcomer youth in exploring ideas and strategies that will amplify their voices, ideas, thoughts, and lived experiences in decision-making spaces in which they are currently entirely excluded from or are underrepresented. We will convene immigrant and refugee youth, along with staff and board members of the Association of Neighbourhood Houses of BC, in co-creation style facilitated dialogues that draw out, identify, and document the most effective and sustainable strategies and structures in order to have newcomer youth's voices captured at the board, governance, and decision-making level at ANHBC's neighbourhood houses. As neighbourhood houses are an important resource to newcomer youth, it is vital that newcomer youth are involved with the neighbourhood house's decision-making on community issues, which directly affect the livelihood of newcomer youth, their peers, and their families. MPNH's Newcomer Youth Leadership Group, along with our newcomer youth groups at fellow neighbourhood houses, will meet to form a city-wide Newcomer Youth Committee to design, implement and evaluate the project from beginning to end. Newcomer youth will meet, highlight key areas of exploration, and facilitate dialogue workshops. The results will be compiled by newcomer youth and the recommendations, strategies and best practices will be presented to ANHBC staff and Board of Directors with the goal of increasing genuine representation in decision-making
$10,000.00
2018

Bill Reid Foundation

Indigenous Youth Governance

The project we are proposing is based on the research completed for the Develop Grant: Indigenous Communities Consultation Project (CCP). The Indigenous Youth Governance Project (YGP) is a three year long project that will seek to safely integrate Indigenous youth representation into the governance structure of the Bill Reid Gallery. We are asking the Vancouver Foundation to support Year 1 of this plan which includes the creation of an Indigenous youth board position in order to increase youth visibility at the leadership level of the organization. The Youth Candidate (YC) will be an Indigenous youth between the age of 16-24 and preference will be given to youth from the Squamish, Musqueam, and Tsleil-Waututh host Nations. The YC will receive an honorarium for their participation at Board and advisory meetings. Under regulation, Board members cannot receive remuneration, therefore we will work with the Board Chair and governance committee to determine an appropriate position title for the youth participant that will allow them to have a fulfilling governance experience and receive appropriate compensation for their expertise. The YC will undergo an orientation period with the Education Coordinator and learn about the Gallery's relationships with different organizations and artists. Near the end of the project, the YC will have the opportunity to develop youth oriented programming with the Education and Program Coordinator.
$10,000.00
2018

Britannia Community Services Centre Society

Youth Voices of East Van

Youth Voices of East Van seeks to develop a sustainable, long-term approach to youth governance in Vancouver's inner city by creating a continuum of strategic leadership opportunities for Indigenous, low-income and newcomer youth, where they are represented on more committees, boards and working groups and in meaningful staff and volunteer roles in local government and non-profit settings. Through the Youth Voices process, youth, local organizations and institutions will be engaged in dialogues designed to generate ideas for more systematic or formalized approaches that empower youth to take an active role in their neighbourhood as well as the additional capacity required to realize this new model of youth governance. Based on Our Place's Accountability Pledge process, the Governance Committee at Our Place has been developing a proposal for a community governance system and we are now establishing a participatory governance model as a permanent mechanism to empower local decision-making on an ongoing basis, in a way that can be replicated across the City. The model will incorporate a structure similar to organization boards and will require special consideration around how youth can be included in both informal and formal ways. Over 13 organizations have now committed to participate in the Governance Pilot Project steering committee and over the next year will work on implementing phase one, which is has received financial support from the City.
$10,000.00
2019

Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society

Changing the face of conservation

Conservation is based on a colonial model that has a long history of contributing to systemic oppression, devaluing non-white worldviews, and Indigenous erasure. Governments would move people off land, violate their title and rights, and designate the area a park or protected area. Not surprisingly then, land and ocean conservation movements, and the people that work in conservation, are predominantly white and middle class. Meanwhile, marginalized communities are often the most affected by changes in climate or the environment, and today’s youth will bear the long-term burden of our current choices. As part of our ongoing work to both decolonize our organization – and influence decolonization in the movement – and to create more spaces for marginalized voices in decision making processes, we would like to more proactively challenge the status quo. While we do more decolonization, anti-oppression and diversity, equity and inclusion work with our staff and board, we would also like to create two new roles on our staff team for young Indigenous youth and folks of colour. The goal would be to have them work directly within our program teams and be fully engaged in decision making, policy development (both at an organizational level and a government level), and all aspects of programming. They will be mentored by staff at the organization to develop strong skills, while having space to shape conservation plans with their own knowledge and experience.
$50,000.00
2018

Carrier Sekani Family Services

Intra-agency Indigenous Engagement Project

We would like to propose an initiative aimed at hoping to learn new ways of creating meaningful engagement for Indigenous youth within our organization. We want to know how we can listen better and what conditions we need to create in order to hire Indigenous youth here at Carrier Sekani Family Services. We desire to foster young Indigenous leaders within our organization and create space for meaningful advancement. -- We would use the funding in order to reach out to neighbouring BC communities (Indigenous) and connect with youth and young adults as well as pay for them to come to Prince George to attend a forum to hear what they need to achieve the above-mentioned. We would create discussion groups, and a panel of young people to facilitate youth conversation about meaningful engagement.
$20,000.00
2020

Check Your Head: The Youth Global Education Network

Disrupting the Nonprofit Industrial Complex: BIPOC Youth Leadership and Solidarities

Upon becoming Check Your Head's ED as a racialized youth and young Muslim woman who is unapologetically committed to struggles for justice, I reached out to BIPOCs within the local nonprofit leadership sector and gradually began to develop an intergenerational network that's interested in supporting pathways to leadership for Indigenous, Black, and other racialized immigrant & refugee youth in transformative ways which honour the (often unpaid) labour that young BIPOC leaders are already doing within their communities, through which this project idea emerged and developed over time. This project is needed because the nonprofit industrial complex has entrenched systemic barriers that prevent Indigenous youth, Black youth, and other racialized immigrant & refugee youth from (re)claiming power and space. Even when BIPOC youth are engaged, it's often done in a tokenizing and extractive manner that doesn't honour the depth of insights they bring. Accordingly, this project is intended to convene BIPOCs involved in the nonprofit leadership sector (staff and/or Board level) as well as BIPOC youth leading grassroots movements (also acknowledging that the both aren't necessarily isolated/separate categories), in order to collaborate on strategies and capacity-building with regards to how nonprofits can leverage their status, power and access towards supporting the grassroots, frontline and peer-based work led by and for BIPOC youth.
$20,000.00
2020

Diversifying Youth-led Boards

Check Your Head is a youth organization led by young people on all levels of the organization. The board positions are open to youth and youth allies, and historically the vast majority of board members have been young people under 35. As such, our board of directors is unique in the non-profit sector, and there are lessons to be learned in the success in removing barriers to youth participation in the governance of the organization. However, this model also comes with its challenges. Structurally, young people and particularly Indigenous and racialized immigrant/refugee youth, don’t have the same level of experience, skills, networks and connections as older and more established individuals who serve on non-profit boards. For the vast majority of all our directors, serving on our board had been their first experience of this kind. This has created gaps in our capacity as the organization and has a number of implications for our work, the solutions to which we want to examine through this project. This project will: 1. Examine structural components of our success in operating for 20 years with a youth-led board so that they can be shared with the wider community and inform further work; 2. Develop solutions to address current gaps in the representation of racialized migrant/refugee and indigenous youth on our board of directors; 3. Build organizational capacity in maintaining a strong and diverse youth-led board.
$10,000.00
2018

Community Arts Council of Prince George

Northern Indigenous Artists' Collective - Youth Arts Administrator

In November 2017, the Community Arts Council of Prince George & District ("CAC") was awarded a Field of Interest Develop grant to support the steering committee of the newly formed Northern Indigenous Artists' Collective ("NIAC"), an unincorporated group, comprised of Indigenous artists, nested within the CAC. NIAC has worked hard over the past months to forge a pathway to become the first non-governmental Indigenous Arts Council in British Columbia. Some of the accomplishments of the group include having a public launch, holding workshops, creating communications platforms, creating a work / meeting space, circulating calls-to-artists for Indigenous arts initiatives, and advising the CAC on Truth and Reconciliation actions. The work of the NIAC under the auspices of the Field of Interest grant continue through the Fall of 2018. In a very short time, this new group has positioned itself as a strong voice for Indigenous Artists in Northern Interior BC. The next initiative is to hire a youth in paid employment position in a new role of "Indigenous Arts Administrator". This new role will mentor with the CAC Executive Director and the NIAC steering committee members. Activities that will occur with this new position and mentorship will include being a staff resource to local Indigenous artists seeking professional development / funding / marketing resources, helping to guide the group towards non-profit status, and helping with the coordination of a major arts event in June.
$16,300.00
2018

DIVERSEcity Community Resources Society

In Solidarity- A Newcomer & Indigenous Youth Leadership Project

$50,000.00
2019

Environmental Youth Alliance

Developing a Leadership Continuum for Indigenous and Immigrant Youth

$50,000.00
2019

Fraser Region Aboriginal Friendship Centre Association

Surrey Indigenous Youth Advisory Council

$50,000.00
2019

Global Youth Education Network Society

Right Relations Advisor

The Right Relations Advisor (RRA) position will provide a pathway to non-profit leadership for a young, Indigenous professional that extends beyond the frontline work that racialized youth are often silo-ed within. The RRA would provide organizational leadership that challenges how we, as the non-profit sector, are complicit in perpetuating colonial structures - and confront this head on! The RRA would focus on 3 strategies: - Lead genius in decolonizing our organizational systems: We believe that before we can demand better of others, we must demand better of ourselves. This work would include decolonizing our base curriculums, providing training, and examining our administrative systems, and /or other organizational systems that are rooted in processes that create barriers to true equity - Convene Indigenous and non-Indigenous young progressives: The non-profit sector is not immune to systemic racism - in fact, we can be the most blind to it! The RR Advisor will spark local conversations that bring together young professionals in a series of workshops and dialogue series to name & tackle these systemic blindspots in a community-driven report - Praxis: The burden of anti-oppression work often falls to those who are most affected by oppressive systems. It will be important for this role to be one of both teaching and learning. Through our partner, IndigenEYEZ, the RRA will have access to Indigenous-centred coaching, elder support, and professional development
$41,000.00
2018

Justice For Girls

Indigenous Young Women and Teenage Girls Recruitment and Hiring

$50,000.00
2019

Kamloops Indian Band

Youth-Leadership-Action

Tk’emlups te Secwepemc’s (TteS) project entitled Youth-Leadership-Action will develop the unique leadership skills that youth required in Indigenous organizations, by combining traditional knowledge and protocols with contemporary leadership skills and methods. Indigenous youth will learn local protocols such as Welcoming Ceremonies that are regularly practiced within the community and traditional territory. Supported by elders, the transfer of knowledge inter-generationally will provide a platform for youth to augment their self-awareness and identity, and build community connectiveness that will increase their leadership abilities and motivate them to participate within the community as leaders. The project will consist of four key components that will build on the necessary skills and abilities of today’s Indigenous leaders. The four components: Cultural Protocols and Teachings, What it Means to be a Leader, Goal Setting, and Community Leadership in Practice, will provide them with the theoretical knowledge and practical experience needed to hold leadership positions within the community and organization.
$36,900.00
2018

Matsqui-Abbotsford Impact Society

Indigenous Co-Executive Directors (ICED)

$50,000.00
2019

McCreary Centre Society

Increasing leadership roles and opportunities for Indigenous members of the Youth Research Academy

In 2016 McCreary opened the Youth Research Academy (YRA) to train youth with care experience to conduct community-based research. To date, two cohorts have graduated and a third is in operation. The success of the YRA has attracted other funders and led to contracts with agencies which have helped make the YRA sustainable. Following the graduation of the first cohort, a YRA Alumni was formed to provide opportunities for graduates to contribute to ongoing projects and mentor new members during their induction. In 2018 this role was expanded to include greater responsibilities and leadership opportunities, and the position was extended to ten months. The position is currently held by an Indigenous member of the YRA Alumni who, in addition to providing mentorship to Indigenous members of the YRA, has assumed a leadership role on projects which aim to improve outcomes for Indigenous youth. Feedback collected through evaluation surveys have suggested the value of this role in promoting cultural safety and inclusion for Indigenous youth. Following the success of this temporary 9 hour a week position, this project seeks to create the role of Indigenous Peer Engagement Coordinator to increase engagement of Indigenous youth in the YRA, YRA Alumni, McCreary’s Aboriginal Advisory Committee (AAC), staff and Board. The role would offer ongoing employment to an Indigenous youth who faces barriers to employment and provide training to enhance their leadership and workplace skills.
$49,700.00
2018

Nelson Community Services Centre Society

Engaging Youth in Board Work

Project idea stems from NCS’s Strategic Plan objectives: to live into the TRC recommendations, to improve inclusive and diversity practices, and to maintain an engaged Board to provide effective governance and leadership. Actions include: staff and board members participated in various experiential activities related to TRC learnings; to recruit indigenous and/or racialized immigrant/refugee youth to board; and to implement a more inclusive hiring practices for agency. Attempts to recruit youth were made by tabling at Selkirk College's Job Fair and by direct contact with individuals. This grant provides an opportunity to explore other processes to engage youth in board work. There is a need for a diverse youth voice within our community. Plan of Action: 1) Partner with Selkirk College's various programs coordinators; 2) Collaborate with Kootenay Boundary Community Services Cooperative; 3) Contract a project coordinator; 4) Conduct Focus groups to identify gaps and opportunities (ages 18-29) 5) Advertise and Communicate Board Work Opportunity Board Work Opportunity: 1) Recruit 2 or 3 indigenous and racialized immigrant/refugee youth from the focus group 2) Based on focus group results, provide board work opportunities i.e. mentorship and training 3) Honorarium provided to youth for a year’s participation on a Board 4) Review at end of year one with recommendations to continue process to increase recruitment for other KBCSC members.
$15,740.00
2020

Network of Inner City Community Services Society

Chinatown Young Leaders

Chinatown Young Leaders’ goal is to strengthen and refine youth leadership development at Yarrow and in Chinatown by empowering youth of East Asian Descent to connect with each other through a dialogue event and develop a strategic 3 year plan. Chinatown is lacking meaningful social justice youth spaces. In our strategic plan, Yarrow committed to increasing decision-making power for our senior and youth members. We have been primarily senior-facing in our programs despite our aim to do intergenerational work. This project will centre on youth decision-making to ensure youth voices and experiences are heard alongside our seniors. We will recruit new members (newcomers and first generation youth) and re-establish existing member commitments. The project will provide anti-oppression and community organizing trainings, to allow youth to reflect and ground their lived experiences in systems that directly affect their lives, while providing inspiration and tools for change. It will also provide a space to reflect on our role in the Chinese community with relationships to Black, Indigenous, migrant, low-income, and drug user communities in the broader Downtown Eastside. From this, youth will plan and host a dialogue event with their peers to discuss opportunities for capacity building and leadership development. Yarrow youth leaders will develop a 3 year strategic plan based on the dialogue outcomes.
$10,000.00
2019

OCCA Communities Association

To Empower the Society for Youth Leadership and Employment

We plan to organize multiple workshops and seminars for board and society training in the topics related to racialized immigrant youth leadership and employment in the non-for-profit organizations, more specifically to prepare the OCCA ready for younger generations of executive and management staff. The project aims to train our team to adapt to ideas of youth and to make known in the racialized immigrants and community in large the facts that the OCCA has great strength and potentials attributed to its principles: transparency, fairness, accountability and integrity in every aspect of the operation - financial management, administration and carrying projects/programs/partnership, that the society is governed by non paid board of directors, that financial rules are clearly stated in the Bylaw and implemented in daily practice. Professional facilitators and university/college students will be invited. We hope to spread the news that career and training opportunities are available for youth in the OCCA.
$10,000.00
2020

School District #36 - Surrey

Building Bridges

The Surrey School District contends it would like to enhance all staff’s knowledge and skills through training in Indigenous Peoples’ ways of knowing, being, and understandings. As an Indigenous Teacher/Graduation Advocate, I have experienced the systemic settler colonialist perspectives of teachers, administrators and supervisors within the Surrey School District in both direct and subtle ways. These are found in the daily minutiae of school life and in the lessons and curriculum across disciplines. It is vital, as a School District, we acknowledge these systemic and prejudicial attitudes and actions, foster awareness of them, and take concrete steps to transform the ways in which our education system operates, and how this in term, continues to deeply impact Indigenous students and families and effect the relationship between Indigenous Peoples and Canadian Settler Society. Speaking with many Indigenous Elders, families, and students, professional development for administrators and educators is an important way to strengthen connections with Indigenous communities, integrate authentic ways of Indigenous cultures within curriculum, and contribute to the growth of all educational professionals, students, and families in the Surrey School District.
$20,000.00
2020

Sierra Club of British Columbia Foundation

Luutkudziiwus Youth Constructive Arrangements-2020

$44,400.00
2019

Right Relations: Centering Indigenous Leadership for the Environmental Non-Profit Sector

This project provides an opportunity for an Indigenous youth to lead the development of a Sierra Club BC outings program, as well as engage with senior staff and a board committee to strengthen organizational policy and approach to Indigenous relations, with mentorship from Indigenous elders and Indigenous board members. Sierra Club BC's Board of Directors recently called for an Indigenous solidarity lens to be applied to all we do. This builds on steps already taken: recruiting two Indigenous directors to the board; cultural sensitivity training for all staff (through Indigenous Perspectives Society); educating board members (presentations from Indigenous directors, participatory blanket exercise, hearing from a local elder); convening an Indigenous Rights and Solidarity sub-committee of the board (to provide input and direction); revising our education programs to better respect Indigenous knowledges; and, across all campaigns, seeking to follow and uplift leadership of Indigenous peoples—e.g. our Pull Together initiative raises funds for Indigenous-led legal challenges. The outings project (launching January 2019) originated when T’Sou-ke Nation knowledge-keeper Charlene George~kQwa’ste’not approached us to co-develop with her a place-based program that would deepen Sierra Club BC’s relations with local nations, build respect for Indigenous worldviews, and highlight best practices for how ENGOs can be in ‘right relations’ with the land and Indigenous peoples.
$50,000.00
2018

Surrounded By Cedar Child and Family Services Society

Surrounded by Cedar Youth Council

$50,000.00
2019

The Circle on Philanthropy and Aboriginal Peoples in Canada

Leadership through the seasons

$50,000.00
2019

The League of Innovators

Decolonizing youth-led non-profits

League of Innovators and CityHive are two of many youth-led, youth-centred non-profits with young people in executive leadership positions. Both organizations recognize the deep need to embed equity within their organizational structure through decolonizing our boards and staff and making them safe for BIPOC folks to work and lead. Youth-led organizations, as nimble and reflexive as they tend to be, often face particular challenges of lacking the credibility, capacity and resources to spend important time and resources for staff to learn and develop personally, as well as for staff and board to work on shifting internal structures to make the organization safer in the short-term and long-term. While we prioritize making our programs accessible for all youth, we lack the additional capacity to ensure the core of the organization is safe, tackling white supremacy, and embedding decolonial practices. Both organizations have struggled to hire, retain and support BIPOC staff and board members. Through this grant, we hope to take a significant step on our equity journeys by: 1) Convening a 2-day decolonization training for staff and board members with an external facilitator, including time and capacity to implement changes. 2) CityHive convening youth-led organizations to discuss and work on tackling how white supremacy exists in the non-profit sector and how youth-centred organizations can collectively address the specific challenges we face.
$20,000.00
2020

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