Awarded Grants

Search or browse below to see past awarded Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

British Columbia Brain Injury Association

What are the rehabilitation and research priorities for improving quality of life among people with TBI?

Over 300,000 people live with traumatic brain injury (TBI). After injury, people experience many physical, cognitive, and mental health problems, which can last from months to a lifetime and significantly impact their quality of life. Additionally, family members, carers, and friends of people with TBI experience changes in their life due to the new roles and commitments caused by the person’s injury. Our goal is to bring together researchers, clinicians, people with TBI, carers, and policy makers to 1) develop key priority areas for rehabilitation and research, and 2) initiate transformative community rehabilitation to improve quality of life for individuals and carers after TBI.
$20,000.00
2020

Immigrant Services Society of British Columbia

Social Connectivity in the time of COVID-19: A participatory needs assessment from the experience of racialized newcomers in Burnaby

We aim to understand how Burnaby can increase social connectivity, especially for recent newcomers from racialized communities. Through the collaboration of community members, service providers, and researchers, we aim to understand community members’ recent social experiences, the role of community programming, barriers to social connectivity, and opportunities for innovation. This project is urgent and important, especially in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, because the learnings will be applied to improve existing service delivery, coordination of services, and implementation of new programs, ultimately boosting social connectivity and enhancing wellbeing in Burnaby.
$20,000.00
2020

MEFM Myalgic Encephalomyelitis and Fibromyalgia Society of British Columbia

Examining the Unmet Needs of British Columbians living with Myalgic Encephalomyelitis: Mapping a Provincial Needs Assessment

This project examines British Columbians living with a disabling and neglected chronic illness, Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (ME) to better understand ME patients’ health and social services needs. It aims to inform policy decision making, and to improve patient care and support. The Convene Grant process allows for community, research, clinical, and decision-makers to partner in the development of a provincial ME needs assessment framework and Investigative Grant proposal. The project will identify key stakeholders, data sources and methodology appropriate to this patient population. Project analysis and reporting will outline next steps to maximise a larger project in the future.
$19,975.00
2020

Nanaimo Region John Howard Society

Engaging the power of community: Recovery, reintegration and healthy lifestyles.

By engaging Guthrie Alumni’s skills and knowledge we will explore the systemic gaps that may exist between health and social recovery. We will examine the role of social networks in alumni recovery that may or may not lead them back into systems of addiction/incarceration. The project has ramifications for health and justice systems responses to addiction. We aim to understand the activities of the informal network that maintains Alumni’s health recovery and social success. In this phase we will collaboratively refine key issues and processes to enable the autonomous participation of Alumni. This work will help us plan a future project on systemic change to post incarceration recovery.
$20,000.00
2020

Simon Fraser University

Eng/aging and HIV: Knowledge Exchange Between Administrative Data Study and Older Adults Living with HIV in British Columbia

To an unprecedented degree in the history of HIV/AIDS, people with HIV are living longer thanks to treatment and there is a need to understand the complexity of aging with HIV by those who live this actuality. This project engages older adults living with HIV, a care provider, and other researchers to convene as a research council. We will co-develop a research plan to examine the recent issue of aging and HIV while using an administrative health data study called COAST at the BC Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS. Through our Convene process, we honour the perspectives and living experiences of older adults living with HIV to shape the research questions and plan of action.
$19,480.00
2020

Thompson Rivers University

Cultural Mapping the Opioid Crisis in Kamloops and Comox Valley, B.C.

The project serves as a community action partnership between researchers, social service agencies, government representatives and Knowledge Holders. It asks – How can cultural mapping as a participatory action research method applied to the opioid crisis help save lives, reduce harm, improve social and community cohesion and create systems change– beginning in the two small communities of Kamloops and Comox Valley, B.C.? The project harbors direct connections with, and commitments from, policy-making organizations, including the City of Kamloops and Vancouver Island Health Authority.
$300,000.00
2020

University of British Columbia

Understanding of Pregnancy Experiences of First Nations Women with Gestational Diabetes in the Nuu-Chah-Nulth communities

Our proposed project aligns with the goals of the Convene Grants. The overall objective of the proposed project is to improve maternal health status, especially women with gestational diabetes living in the NTC communities. By understanding the gestational diabetes issue, we can generate recommendations to support and improve patient experiences and clinical outcomes and increase access to diabetes education and training. The results from the planning and focus group study phase will be used to apply for a multi-year large intervention grant from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research.
$19,888.00
2020

Community-led Options for Access to Substitution Therapies (COAST) Project

Our team is working to understand the impacts of community cannabis programs (CCPs) on the lives of people who use drugs (PWUD) amidst dual public health crises—the opioid crisis and the COVID-19 pandemic. Many PWUD are using cannabis from CCPs to reduce other substance use, withdrawal symptoms, and cravings, which in turn helps to reduce harms. The Convene Grant will bring together leading researchers on substance use, people with lived experience, CCP coordinators, and policy makers, to co-develop a research plan to study the impacts of CCPs on PWUD, which will help create well-informed policies and practices and empower community-led organizations to support their communities.
$17,796.70
2020

Healing from Trauma and Wet'suwet'en Wellness

Our project is an investigation of how the root causes of trauma impact Wet'suwet'en wellness and how Indigenous Focusing Oriented Therapy (IFOT) supports their healing. Healing from trauma, resulting from the ongoing impacts of colonialism, is critical because of its far-reaching impacts on multiple levels of individual and community life. This research will inform the wellness strategy of the Office of the Wet'suwet'en, generate awareness and action plans to address trauma through the Wet'suwet'en membership, and foster education and dialogue regarding the Wet'suwet'en context of healing to influence systems change within the local health service provider community.
$27,090.00
2020

Truth (through art) to power: Arts-based truth-telling to transform research and reduce inequities at the intersections of health and justice

Health and social inequities faced by Indigenous Peoples are linked to criminal justice inequities. A partnership between the UBC Transformative Health & Justice Research Cluster and Megaphone Magazine will host writing workshops, and a subsequent public truth-telling series where people affected by the criminal justice system will share their stories towards destigmatization and empowerment. Stakeholders and researchers will be invited, and a graphic recorder and filmmaker will visually collect themes. This series will provide a roadmap to shape research priorities and the development of PAR funding applications that address social, health and criminal justice inequities.
$19,903.44
2020

A participatory framework to support the social-emotional wellbeing of children in the early years: Developing a sustainable, coordinated and strength-based system

In British Columbia, we are observing a worrying trend of increasing numbers of young children with social-emotional vulnerabilities. Children who experience social-emotional vulnerabilities during the early years of life are susceptible to a number of negative health and social outcomes across the lifespan. Our project will convene a diverse participant network in three BC communities to develop a community-based participatory action research agenda to address systemic influences on children’s social-emotional vulnerability.
$20,000.00
2020

University of Northern British Columbia

Land, Health and Healing: Understanding and promoting the health and wellness benefits of Indigenous Protected Areas

Health scholars working in Indigenous health acknowledge that connection to land is an important aspect to improving health and wellbeing. Yet little research explores the health and wellbeing benefits of connections to the land, which is particularly important in light of the recent resurgence of Indigenous-led conservation initiatives. Our team is trying to understand how Indigenous Protected Areas can be understood through a lens rooted in health, healing, and wellness. This project has the potential to develop into a viable research project which examines the connections between Indigenous-led conservation initiatives and the links between land, health and wellbeing.
$20,000.00
2020

University of Victoria

Community Empowerment of African Migrant Women Across British Columbia

Sub-Saharan African migrant women and their families in Canada are disproportionately burdened by social and health inequities. British Columbia has one of the highest numbers of female African migrant women in Canada. How can we address these inequities created by intersections of social identities, policies, processes of oppression and privilege, and institutional practices both here in Canada and from their pre- migration contexts? Through a community-based provincial townhall meeting we will bring African migrant women and other stakeholders together to deliberate and decide on research questions to inform improvements to their daily lived experiences and that of their families.
$20,000.00
2020

A Community Based Participatory Project to Understand the Health Impacts of LGBTQ2S Recreational Sports on Sexually and Gender Diverse Communities

We know that LGBTQ2S people face poorer health outcomes compared to their straight and cisgender peers. LGBTQ2S people are more likely to be diagnosed with depression and to experience feelings of loneliness and social isolation. Understanding the benefits that community athletics might have in challenging these health disparities will offer new insights for healthcare practitioners committed to promoting the health and wellbeing of LGBTQ2S communities. The Convene process will allow the research team to gauge and explore the themes that LGBTQ2S recreational athletes identify as central to their involvement in LGBTQ2S sports spaces and how they have impacted their health and wellbeing.
$18,860.00
2020

Vancity Community Foundation

Making Mothers Matter: Understanding the Role of Child Care on the Health and Wellbeing of Low-Income Lone-Mothers in British Columbia

This study will advance knowledge from the lived experiences of low-income lone mothers on the impact of BC's new child care policies on their health and wellbeing. One of two lone, female headed families in British Columbia is in poverty. Lack of childcare prevents low-income lone-mothers from accessing the labor market, obtaining education and training, countering social isolation, and moving out of poverty. BC has committed $1 billion to reduce the cost of child care including the testing of a universal child care model. This PAR will influence systems change by building knowledge, community, and social action around the role of child care in low-income lone-mothers’ health and wellbeing.
$300,000.00
2020

Vancouver Island University

Youth Language Warriors: Reclaiming Hul'qumi'num through Intergenerational Relationships and the Arts

Tsawalk Learning Centre, Nanaimo Aboriginal Centre and Vancouver Island University are seeking to convene a group of young people, Elders and community members who want to better understand how revisiting and reclaiming Indigenous language through the arts positively impacts wellness and healing. Together the young people will develop specific research questions which can be answered through an artistic public art form. The project aims to include those most likely to be impacted by the loss of Indigenous local languages in the design of a research project which can inform systems planning to improve Indigenous language learning throughout the province and beyond.
$20,000.00
2020