Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

Sources Community Resource Centres Society

Surrey Rent Bank

Rent banks prevent homelessness among low income earners by providing loans for rental/utility arrears or damage deposits. Since March 2010, the Surrey Rent Bank has delivered 65 loans, which have kept 200 people housed. The rent bank also encourages low-income earners to mend relationships with landlords and connect with mainstream banking institutions. The goal of this project is to prevent homelessness and increase housing stability by delivering a minimum of 45 new loans while promoting asset building via access to financial literacy.
$30,000.00
2011

South Okanagan/ Similkameen Brain Injury Society

Employment Outreach Program

Employment Outreach Program
$52,250.00
2011

South Vancouver Family Place

Fraser Lands Family Resource Program

This project will add to a family resource program in the West Fraser lands community by adding a transition program for 4-year-olds entering kindergarten as well as a parent education component. Families with young children would participate in the easy to access program and we would target immigrant families who tend to have more challenges in accessing services.
$40,000.00
2011

SPARC BC Society

Professional Development for Teachers on Teaching about Homelessness

Learning about Homelessness in BC: A Guide for Senior High-School Teachers by Jennifer Hales (2010) is a new resource that provides lesson plans and materials for high school teachers interested in teaching about homelessness. This pilot project will support the dissemination of this guide through a series of workshops in up to ten (10) school districts across Metro Vancouver and the Fraser Valley. An Advisory Committee will be established to provide guidance in the design, delivery and evaluation of the teacher training workshops.
$27,200.00
2011

Ensuring Dignified Access to Local Healthy Food for Marginalized Populations

Marginalized populations have less access to local healthy food because of systemic barriers caused by unemployment and low income, rising food prices, inappropriate public responses to their food security needs, and literacy barriers. Most programmes improving food security for marginalized groups are based on a charitable model of hand-outs. This project will create new knowledge about the ways in which marginalized groups can be supported to gain dignified access to healthy food, leading to changes in the way that marginalized populations and food providers interact.
$44,000.00
2011

Summerland Cat Sanctuary Society

i) Critteraid Farm Environmental Improvements ii) CDART Project CrocTalk Bunny Sanctuary iii) Summerland Cat Sanctuary / Feral Kitten Program Isolation Cages

i) Critteraid Farm Environmental Improvements To give you some history, in 2007/2008, Critteraid volunteers developed an initiative called Project Equus addressing the wild horses of British Columbia. We submitted this Proposal to the Penticton Indian Band and to known owners/guardians of the free-roaming horses, as a vision of what can be achieved cooperatively by individuals, bands, non-profit groups/registered charities, service clubs, politicians, entrepreneurs, and more. With the objective of this project being to humanely and safely decrease and control the population of the free-roaming horses, responsible range management practices would follow. The document was intended to provide long-term solutions to managing the free-roaming horse problem. Areas of concern that are addressed in this document cover: A. PUBLIC SAFETY B. SOUND EQUINE HEALTH C. GOOD RANGE MANAGEMENT PRACTICES D. COMPASSIONATE EQUINE TRAINING E. SECURE FUTURE FOR HORSES F. VIABLE TOURISM ENTREPRENEURSHIP On Friday February 18, 2011 the Honourable Steve Thomson, Minister of Natural Resource Operations announced that a mare and a stallion seized from rangeland near Deadman Lake will be turned over to the Summerland-based rescue organization Critteraid. Minister Thomson used his parliamentary privilege to do this and sent a further 4 horses to Critteraid and prevented another 6 horses from going to slaughter where the previous impounded horses all ended up. Unfortunately, our dealings with the individual horse owners on the Penticton Indian Reserve had not developed as we had hoped and one owner alone had shipped over 50 horses for slaughter. It is considered a normal practice. It is our intent to show the magnificence of these incredible animals as a viable tourism endeavour that would attract people from all over the world. The wild horses of British Columbia are truly a resource worthy of note. We have met with one member of the Penticton Indian Band and arranged and paid for her training in Colorado for administering the PZP birth control vaccine. We have raised funds for the dart rifle and secured same. Since that time, we have just learned of a Canadian vaccine that is more efficient, less handling of the horses thus less intrusive and as effective, if not more effective. Three of the mares brought in to Critteraid were pregnant and they have all since foaled. We presently have 5 of the wild horses at Critteraid Farm, one continues training and three have been adopted. In order to continue to provide this care for additional horses at Critteraid Farm, we need to comply more sooner than later with the Environmental Farm Assessment protocols. When our study was undertaken, we learned that we would have to remove two of the paddocks/pastures and we have made the decision to leave them empty rather than to destroy them. We will continue to do the basic maintenance that would be required in order to accommodate any animals during disasters or emergencies as Critteraid Farm is set up to be an animal intake facility during a declared local state of emergency. Therefore, two more pastures/paddocks with loafing sheds need to be built in order to accommodate the existing population. ii) CDART PROJECT CROCTALK BUNNY SANCTUARY In 2010, our emergency animal rescue division CDART (Canadian Disaster Animal Response Team) volunteers attended a crocodilian facility in East Kelowna where they were asked to take guinea pigs and rabbits that were provided as food for the crocodilians. After a lot of thought and planning, the volunteers agreed to be responsible for these animals and removed them from the facility. All were spayed and neutered and out of the 49 guinea pigs, we only have 17 remaining due to good adoptions. A decision was made to keep the large breed bunnies together as they were a bonded group and did not make good pets due to their size (spinal injuries are often caused from people mishandling them). We were able to make a temporary structure to house the bunnies but this past winter we experienced severe flooding and foundation damage and we are seeking funds for a new efficient, secure and comfortable structure. iii) SUMMERLAND CAT SANCTUARY / FERAL KITTEN PROGRAM In 2011, we received funding for one stainless steel unit consisting of three cages. This has proved to be invaluable to us. We are seeking two additional units: one for the Summerland Cat Sanctuary and one for our Feral Kitten Program.
$5,027.00
2011

Symphony of the Kootenays

Music in the Mountains

The Symphony of the Kootenays, in partnership with the St. Eugene Golf Resort & Casino, Just Music, and the St. Mary's Band, plans to perform at a first ever free outdoor concert. This concert will feature work from well known aboriginal composer Barbara Croall. While the piece is relatively new in the spectrum of classical works we intend to adapt this piece with the addition of local aboriginal storytellers and dancers. This will be an outdoor concert performed at the St. Eugene Resort and Casino. This is a pilot project. It is a cross cultural venture with the Ktunaxa Nation, planned to coincide with Aboriginal Day for the purpose of recognizing Aboriginal peoples' important place within the fabric of Canada and to showcase the area's arts and culture locally and regionally. Providing an opportunity for public appreciation of classical and aboriginal music and culture; all in the historical venue of St Eugene’s. It is also an opportunity to invite a variety of visitors to come and experience our beautiful region, and its cultural diversity, and provide some economic spin off.
$14,400.00
2011

Take A Hike, Youth at Risk Foundation

Expansion

In 2005, Take a Hike was enabled to double its program and hire a part-time Executive Director to increase its impact on youth. Five years later, we're reaching out to the Vancouver Foundation to support our second growth phase; offering the program in additional communities throughout BC. One of our Foundation's five objectives in its 2010/2011 strategic plan is to increase impact and reach through program expansion. We will empower communities to adopt (and adapt) the Take a Hike program to suit their specific needs so more youth can experience the life-changing benefits that Take a Hike has to offer. The Take a Hike Foundation has identified 4 key steps to move the growth initiative forward, and IN CAPS, I've identified our progress: 1) Identify a suitable growth model (governance, fundraising, reporting, etc.) COMPLETE 2) Develop a community capacity assessment tool (market scorecard). COMPLETE 3) Build relationships with new communities. IN PROGRESS 4) Create a Resource Kit (a Take a Hike manual for other communities) and Training Program TO COMMENCE IN MAY 2011
$55,000.00
2011

Terra Nova Schoolyard Society

East Richmond Schoolyard Program

Building on the success of programming at the Terra Nova, we would like to expand the programming to work with areas that are underserved with a higher proportion of low-income and recent immigrant youth. As well, we would like to start an intergenerational program of having seniors with gardening/farming experience mentor students. Project Goals 1. Work with 2 elementary schools in East Richmond (Mitchell and McNeely) 2. Have 250-300 students participate in programming 3. Recruit 20-30 seniors (gardeners/farmers) to work with students 4. Recruit 2-3 farmers to act as program mentors 5. To continue to grow the program within Richmond. Begin succession planning: In order to continue to offer expanded training, the Richmond Schoolyard Society will need to begin training other trainers for the program. This could involve one individual on a full time basis or a number of potential trainers on a part time basis. Regardless, the RSS will begin a process of transitioning some of the programming to these new trainers.
$35,000.00
2011

The Arts Club of Vancouver Theatre Company

Scar Tissue

Scar Tissue, based on Michael Ignatieff’s Booker Prize-nominated novel, is an intensely personal work about family, love in all its guises and the ultimate triumph of life over loss. This project will continue fostering a healthy writing community by giving more writers opportunities for production.
$15,000.00
2011

The Garth Homer Society

Employment First

The GHS works with over 150 clients, 60 in employment services, to create opportunities for independence, growth and participation/integration in the community for people who strive to overcome developmental disabilities. The sector's philosophical initiative toward full integration and clients' desire to work has brought to the forefront the need for more staff training as well as the preparation of marketing and information collateral for potential employers. We will be the first agency to do so in Greater Victoria and will be sharing our process and results with other agencies and care givers.
$5,500.00
2011

The Responsible Animal Care Society

Rabbit Rescue Sanctuary

In 2008 a shelter to house rescued rabbits was hastily constructed in East Kelowna, on land donated by a wonderful woman who cares deeply about animals. This housed the initial rescue of 45 bunnies. The rescue effort has continued. This shelter has grown and now houses about 380 neutered and spayed rabbits in various pens. The hastily built pens, of an emergency nature, have deteriorated, and now offer only marginal protection to our rescued friends. The flat roof has developed leaks. There can be an accumulation of snow in the winter, due to the Kelowna climate, and it is dangerous for our volunteers to climb onto the roof to clear the snow. The under-wired floor mesh is rusting in places and holes have now been created by the rabbits. We are forever doing patch-work throughout the present building. Completion of the replacement shelters will provide our rescued rabbits with a safe and weatherproof living space.
$11,080.00
2011

The South Okanagan Rehabilitation Centre for Owls

Rehabilitation Clinic

Build a structure that would serve as a medical treatment clinic for birds. This facility would incorporate: -Bird reception area -Examination room -Medical treatment area -Intensive care recovery area -Storage room for food & supplies -Interpretive room for training and engaging interested groups (i.e. schools) -Are for volunteer lockers
$15,000.00
2011

Thompson Nicola Cariboo United Way

Kamloops Life Skills Assessment Coordinator

Life skills training is a key step to ending homelessness. Life skills such as critical thinking, emotional control and stress management overlap in complex ways with skills such as hygiene, budgeting, and home maintenance. This project will hire a trained evaluator who will design and facilitate workshops and interviews to evaluate current Life Skills Training, then provide the information to assist agencies in their development of Life Skills Programs related to homelessness.
$6,000.00
2011

Thompson Rivers University Foundation

Meeting the Needs of First-Generation and Aboriginal Students

The proposed project would provide support for first-generation and aboriginal students at two crucial points in their academic decision-making and transition: high school and the first year of university studies. Both programs are premised on the importance of providing role models and mentorship from older students. The first component is a set of summer camp workshops that will encourage Aboriginal high school students to plan for success in post-secondary education and promote their interest in potential careers in science and health sciences. Workshops include two one-week, on-campus programs for Aboriginal youth in Grades 8-9 and 10-12. The second is a mentoring program that will provide first-generation students (Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal) with support and comprehensive knowledge of university services and resources. Upper-year, first-generation students will be selected and trained as mentors to work with incoming students. The regular meetings between mentors and mentees will be focused on topics such as time management, goal setting, and study habit development.
$25,000.00
2011

Tides Canada Foundation

Urban Aboriginal Peoples Study: City of Vancouver report and public engagement

The Urban Aboriginal Peoples Study is an extensive new research study that has gone beyond the numbers to capture the values, experiences and aspirations of Aboriginal peoples living in Vancouver, Edmonton, Calgary, Regina, Saskatoon, Winnipeg, Thunder Bay, Toronto, Montreal, Halifax and Ottawa. Speaking directly with a representative group of 2,614 First Nations peoples, Métis and Inuit living in these major Canadian cities, as well as 2,501 non-Aboriginal Canadians, the Environics Institute, led by Michael Adams, has released the Urban Aboriginal Peoples Study, which offers Canadians a new perspective of their Aboriginal neighbours. Guided by an Advisory Circle, Aboriginal people designed the research themes, methodology, and executed the main survey. City findings are now available, beginning with the Regina City Report, and the Toronto City Report, which takes a look at the Urban Aboriginal Peoples Study results specifically through a community based lens on each of those cities. Also available for download is a power point Regina presentation, and a Toronto presentation of the results. This project focuses on the City of Vancouver and compares Vancouver to the overall study results and to other cities. The Vancouver City Report will analyze the date generated by the overall study for city specific results and provide key insights in program and policy development.
$10,000.00
2011

Tides Canada Initiatives Society

Pacific Wild/Coastal Connections-Virtual Rainforest Initiative

Coastal Connections- Virtual Rainforest Initiative (CC-VRI) is an educational program focused on utilizing new technology, experiential learning and locally-relevant resources connect youth in place-based communities to with the lands and waters of their traditional territories. Piloted in the coastal First Nations communities of Bella Bella and Hartley Bay, the program uses interactive white boards, remote wildlife webcams, and outdoor natural history training to bring ecology and conservation to life and to cultivate a new generation of stewards and natural resource managers in the Great Bear Rainforest. This collaborative effort between Pacific Wild, local community groups such as QQS Projects and the Gitga'at Land and Resources Stewardship Society, the Bella Bella and Hartley Bay community schools, along with the American Museum of Natural History and the Nature Conservancy, strives to develop an educational model that will provide youth with the passion and skills needed to pursue education and employment opportunities in science and conservation for years to come.
$70,000.00
2011

Youth on Water- Skeena Watershed Conservation Coalition

YOW! is an outdoor recreation and education program that empowers regional youth through water level activities that connect participants with local rivers, a sense of adventure, environmental awareness and technical guide training, providing transferable job skills and confidence as raft guides. A highly visible and successful program, it grew to four communities in 2010.
$20,000.00
2011

Striving for an "A" in Aboriginal Education

Tides Canada Initiatives, in collaboration with Tyee Solutions Society (TSS), proposes to explore a variety of experiments in Aboriginal-led education in B.C. through an innovative journalism project, published in multiple media outlets. TSS will tell the nuanced stories of these new experiments in culturally-responsive education: the challenges, but mostly the promising early successes. We propose to focus on five B.C. communities; to listen, learn, and build relationships, and to formally interview, report and photograph. Stories will be intended for the general public but will also be in-depth enough to be a useful resource for people working on the ground to affect change, aboriginal and non-aboriginal. This project builds on recent education reporting by Katie Hyslop, and on her masters’ thesis for the UBC School of Journalism on child poverty in Hazelton, which involved traveling to the community and interviewing politicians, Aboriginal families, a representative of the Gitxsan treaty office, and others. You can find her recent education reporting here: http://thetyee.ca/Bios/Katie_Hyslop/
$9,845.00
2011

Protecting Fish Habitat and Freshwater in the Upper Fraser Basin

This project will further the work between the First Nations of the Yinka Dene Alliance (YDA) and Dr. Jack Stanford, a Professor of Ecology at the University of Montana specializing in river and freshwater ecology. It will combine Dr. Stanford’s impact assessment of the proposed Northern Gateway Pipeline on the Sutherland, Stuart, and Salmon Rivers within the YDA traditional territories with the traditional ecological knowledge holders of the YDA First Nations. The final results will inform the YDA traditional decision-making process.
$40,000.00
2011

Together Against Poverty Society (TAPS)

Volunteer Disability Advocacy Project - Year 2

Volunteer Disability Advocacy Project - Year 2
$20,000.00
2011

TTS Theatre Terrific Society

I Love Mondays

I Love Mondays
$30,000.00
2011

Turtle Valley Donkey Refuge Society

Barn #1 Enhancement Project

To add a covered overhang roof to Barn #1 which will provide a weather protected area for the resident donkeys and enhance their opportunity for increased comfort during inclement weather.
$13,268.00
2011

UBC - Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery

Letters: Michael Morris and Concrete Poetry

Letters: Michael Morris and Concrete Poetry examines paintings, sculpture, photography and film produced by Morris in 1968/1969 around the time he organized an important exhibition of concrete poetry at the UBC Fine Arts Gallery in 1969. The exhibition will include concrete poetry from the Belkin’s collection of approximately 2,000 items (including ephemera, prints, posters, broadsheets, objects, books and catalogues), as well as works borrowed from public and private collections. The exhibition recognizes Morris’ immense contribution to the development of Vancouver as a global contemporary art city.
$28,000.00
2011

UBC Human Early Learning Partnership (HELP)

Early Years Community Developers (EYCD) Institute

The overall aim of the Early Years Community Development (EYCD) Institute will be to build a better, more sustainable and community driven system for the early years in B.C. by creating mechanisms to strengthen the practice of EYCD professionals. The ultimate impact and evidence of a stronger early childhood system will be reflected in improved measures of child development outcomes and community capacity. This is the initial phase of the project. This phase is designed to build the capacity and competency of EYCD Professionals through: •Linking existing EYCD professionals in B.C. through a variety of opportunities for learning, resource sharing, practice-based research and peer mentorship. •Developing and then implementing a program of professional development to include on line as well as face to face sessions. This program will focus on identifying the core competencies of EYCD and establishing flexible approaches for content delivery. . Developing and maintaining a website to host EYCD professional development and networking opportunities.
$7,500.00
2011

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