Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

Arts in Action Society

Groundswell: Grassroots Economic Alternatives

Our proposal comes in two parts: first a training institute where young people (up to age 35) can come together for a year's intensive program to imagine, design and build new enterprises including cooperatives, collectives, non-profits, arts and artisanal enterprises, self-employment scenarios and other grassroots configurations: all explicitly contributing to a community economic fabric of reciprocity. Each program will run for ten months: 4 months of intensive work, a month of strategizing and proposal planning, then 5 months of supported project development. Participants will develop the comprehensive skills - individually and collectively needed to run their own enterprises. The second piece is that we will link graduates and their new initiatives into a network of mutual aid and support. Each graduating participant and enterprise will be a member of the Groundswell Co-op relying on and supporting one another, and being supported by the collective institutional, organizational and financial resources. Ongoing reciprocity and interconnectedness is the key to our proposal.
$70,000.00
2012

Association of Neighbourhood Houses of British Columbia

Frog Hollow Neighbourhood House Pathways Out of Poverty

Pathways Out of Poverty pilots a strength-based collaborative project to build capacity among immigrant women & their families to: -Understand possible pathways out of poverty & for achieving a living wage. -Navigate training/employment services & related community supports -Develop problem solving, networking & assertiveness skills needed to address personal & systemic barriers. -Develop leadership & speaking skills to facilitate participation in public dialogue to address systemic barriers & key employment issues. The need for programming to support local immigrant women to move into paid employment was identified in 2006 and 2009-10 through the Frog Hollow Community Connections Project. In 2009, Jennifer Chun, Department of Sociology at UBC, broadened this exploration by facilitating 4 city wide neighbourhood cafes to identify the issues prevent women obtaining a "living wage" or work in their field of expertise. Pathways Out of Poverty is a collaboration between organizational stakeholders & immigrant women to positively address issues of personal & systemic exclusion.
$76,302.00
2012

Canadian Centre For Policy Alternatives

Building Climate Justice Education in British Columbia

The Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA), through its Climate Justice Project (CJP), will develop an education strategy to share current research findings about climate change and inequality with schools and the broader public. Since 2009, the CJP has generated a body of research that explores such areas as transportation policy, food security, resource and forestry policy, employment and green jobs, energy policy and carbon pricing strategies in the BC context and through an equity lens. This research serves as building blocks of an integrated and equitable climate strategy, and a bold vision of how BC can move forward in a zero-emissions future. This project is an engagement and education strategy that will translate the CJP's findings and research into educational materials that can be used by teachers and schools, along with community groups and other popular education efforts, with a focus on curriculum resources and professional development for teachers. This project will enhance young peoples' understanding of salient issues around climate change and climate action.
$70,000.00
2012

Canadian Mental Health Association - Kelowna & District Branch

Connected by 25

Connected by 25 is an innovative, cross-sectoral project that addresses the needs of young people between the ages of 16 and 24 in the Central Okanagan vulnerable in their transition to adulthood. Feedback from young people and community stakeholders identified both the need and rationale for the project, and a CAI service innovation grant allowed a two year pilot of Connected by 25 to start in early 2012. The project builds capacity within the community to ensure that young people at risk of falling through the cracks in their transition to adulthood have access to the services they require. It further serves to build capacity in youth themselves by offering the relational, emotional, and material supports they need. The project incorporates a dedicated part-time community capacity coordinator, who works with community based organizations to enhance collaboration, and identify and address systemic barriers. Concurrently, a full-time youth navigator provides directs supports and assistance to navigate complex systems, build connections and achieve success in their lives.
$80,000.00
2012

David Suzuki Foundation

Protecting the Peace: Enhancing Local Voices in the Greater Peace Break Region

The Peace Break Region supports agriculture and diverse wildlife, including threatened populations of bull trout, grizzly, fisher, and woodland caribou. The region has been severely degraded by logging, mining, oil and gas development and earlier large-scale hydro development. The region's lowlands are dominated by seismic lines, fracking operations, roads, pipeline crossings and other industrial infrastructure that seriously threaten the region's critical ecosystem services that regulate climate, disease outbreaks, and wastes, and that provide aesthetic, recreational and spiritual value. Unfortunately, the true worth of the region's natural capital is often poorly understood by policy-makers. For this reason the DSF and its partner West Moberly FN are proposing to complete a full natural capital valuation that will inventory and enumerate, in dollar terms, the non-market wealth of the region. This research will be accompanied by online mapping and other public engagement tools that will communicate the importance of natural capital to sustaining communities in the north.
$80,000.00
2012

DIVERSEcity Community Resources Society

Sports and Me Program

Sport and Me program is a partnership project between DIVERSEcity and the City of Surrey to provide outreach, family support, and sports readiness services to multi-barriered and Government Assisted Refugee (GAR) children. The project reaches out to children with the goal to provide a safe environment where they often have their first exposure to a recreation center and rec services, and the opportunity to learn sport etiquette, language and skill. Through this route, children can feel comfortable participating in school and community sports/recreation as they understand expectations around participation. The project also provides nutritional support through teaching of healthy children’s development, nutritional snacks/meals, and link to physical health opportunities – with the goal to engage children in active living for life. The funding request to the Vancouver Foundation will allow us to expand the current program and increase participation with other multi-barriered newcomer and at-risk children.
$70,000.00
2012

Hope in Shadows Inc.

Developing the Hope in Shadows and Megaphone Vendor Program

This project will substantially develop the Hope in Shadows and Megaphone vendor program by expanding its reach while filling gaps in the support and training that vendors receive. The project's objectives - to increase vendors' sales and the number of active Megaphone vendors, to help vendors build their skills and to provide them with meaningful social connections - were developed after consulting with vendors and staff from successful North American street newspapers. This project will achieve its objectives through hiring a full-time vendor coordinator who will organize training workshops, team-building events and meetings for vendors. In addition to these group activities the coordinator will support and encourage vendors through field visits and individual check-ins. The co-ordinator will also do outreach to make vendor opportunities accessible to homeless and low-income people while building support for vendors among residential and business communities. This project will allow for the continuation of a Vendor Advisory Board, which had a successful three month trail in 2011.
$80,000.00
2012

Planned Lifetime Advocacy Network

Network for Belonging

The Network for Belonging Initiative aims to extend PLAN's Personal Support Network Model in the broader community, in particular we will work with partners from the Brain Injury, Drug and Alcohol addictions, and mental health communities. The common theme of isolation is deeply felt in these communities and through initial explorations our partners believe that the Personal Support Network model, when tailored to address their unique needs will be an important strategy to increase belonging and decrease the devastation of living life in isolation. The Initiative is not just about sharing the concept of personal support networks; it is about developing financially sustainable models to support their application. Building sustainable PSN models across our partner organizations will yield rich learning which we will capture and share. This learning will both guide future PSN model replication as well as inform the public policy aspects of the Network for Belonging Initiative.
$75,000.00
2012

Ray-Cam Co-operative Centre

MoreSports

MoreSports is a collaborative initiative that provides sustainable sport and physical activity opportunities for children and families, focused on kids who typically do not participate in sports. We build on existing community resources to deliver programs & events in partnership with schools, local government, community groups, private businesses and non-profits. The model is: go where children are, provide structures and programming that fit with what children and families actually want. The approach is unique in two ways: • First, barriers to participation are not only removed but are rendered invisible • Second, programs and activities are built on and integrated within existing structures and systems The strategy was designed to build on community strengths, capacities and priorities, foster social inclusion and develop the capacity to deliver a multitude of sport and skill development activities for local children and youth. Part of developing this capacity is fostering local leadership through the YELL (Youth Engage Learn Lead) initiative.
$75,000.00
2012

University of British Columbia

Understanding smoking cessation behaviour in Vancouver's Chinese Communities (Dr. Mark Fitzgerald/Ms. Eliza Chang)

For numerous reasons, minority and immigrant communities in Canada may be at greater risk of smoking-related illnesses. This is particularly true among immigrants from Mandarin and Cantonese-speaking communities, where smoking rates remain disproportionately high. To date, millions have been spent on developing smoking cessation interventions, but their effectiveness in diverse cultural communities has been limited, likely because of a variety of social and cultural factors. Through a series of recent focus groups, representatives of Vancouver's Chinese communities have expressed a need for more culturally sensitive strategies to support smoking cessation in their community. We plan to address this need by using community-based participatory approaches to generate new knowledge about why smokers in Vancouver's Chinese communities continue to smoke and what their smoking cessation needs are. Our study will apply a community-academia coalition model, in which a Community Advisory Council (CAC) comprising of representatives from the Chinese community including smokers and non smokers, community key-informants (well-known socially influential/ respected individuals from the Mandarin-speaking and Cantonese-speaking communities), professional groups, and knowledge-users will oversee the project. Our findings will inform the creation of community-driven culturally appropriate resources aimed at reducing smoking rates (and therefore chronic lung & heart diseases) in these communities Research Team: Milan Khara, Tobacco Dependence Clinic; Iraj Poureslami, UBC; Stephem Lam, Lung Tumour Group; Maylene Fong, Evergreen; Ka Wai Cheung, UBC; Farzaneh Osati, Canadian Multicultural Health Promotion Society
$75,000.00
2012

Communicating the Case for A New Deal for Families: Phase 2

This project builds on an existing partnership between the Vancouver Foundation, the UBC Human Early Learning Partnership, the United Way of the Lower Mainland and the YWCA of Metro Vancouver. The project aims to transform research into action to address many of the time, income, service and environmental challenges that confront Vancouver families with young children in all their diversity. Previous research shows that the standard of living for the generation raising young children has deteriorated significantly. The same research reveals that public policy has been slow to adapt. This is a bad deal for families. In the absence of policy adaption, over 30 per cent of local children start school vulnerable. Early vulnerability compromises childhood, and has adverse consequences for children’s future school achievement, health, risk of incarceration, and employment success. There is now compelling research to move from a bad deal to a New Deal for Families, including local, national and global evidence about the required policy changes. (see full document for details).
$75,000.00
2012

University of British Columbia School of Nursing

Fostering Health & Human Rights: A Medical Legal Pilot Study (Judith Lynam, UBC/Kate Hodgon, Network of Inner City Community Services Society)

Our broad concern is to generate insights to foster child and family health equity. We are proposing to undertake research to to examine the ways structural violence operates in the day to day lives of children, youth & families living with marked social and material adversity in Vancouver's inner city. We propose to illustrate the impact of structural violence on health, child development & community well being and to use this analysis to inform the design of a Medical Legal Partnership (MLP). Structural violence refers to 'social structures-economic, political, legal...that stop individuals, groups and societies from reaching their full potential. The idea of structural violence is linked very closely to social injustice and the social machiner of oppression' (Farmer et al, 2004, 2006a,b). 'MLPs integrate legal services as a vital component of the healthcare team. Through direct service, transforming institutions and influencing policy change, MLPs address the non-medical, social determinants of health that have legal remedies' (MLP website). As such, this approach may assist the target community to address the systemic issues that contribute to the poor health profile of children and families. The research will provide the baseline data for an evidence-based approach for addressing structural violence and will inform the development of a strategy, a plan and a financial model. Research Team: Anthony Boardman, UBC Christine Loock, UBC; Lorine Scott, BC Children's Hospital;, Ronald G. Friesen, Continueing Legal Educaiton Society of BC; John Simpson, Legal Services Society
$71,257.00
2012

Vancouver Symphony Orchestra

U.S. West Coast Tour

The Vancouver Symphony Orchestra has been invited to undertake a tour of the U.S. West Coast in January/February 2013. The invitation was extended by Columbia Artists Management (CAMI), one of the world's most experienced and prestigious classical music artist management firms. Interest from presenters has been high, and the tour will consist of 8 concerts taking place in Seattle, Las Vegas, Santa Barbara, Northridge and Alisa Viejo (suburbs of Los Angeles), Palm Desert, Scottsdale and Tucson. Our Music Director, Bramwell Tovey, will conduct all concerts and the piano soloist will be world-renowned Vancouverite Jon Kimura Parker. The program will include a new work the VSO has commissioned from Edward Top, our Composer-In-Residence, entitled 'Totem' (a reflection on First Nations themes), the Grieg Piano Concerto and Prokofiev Symphony No. 5. The VSO has a long history of touring and most recently toured Central Canada in 2009 with concerts in Ottawa, Toronto, Montreal and Quebec City and Asia - Korea, Macau and China in 2008. It last toured the U.S. West Coast in 1978
$75,000.00
2012

Watari Research Association

Transition to Independence Program - TIP II

$70,000.00
2012