Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

Association of Neighbourhood Houses of British Columbia

Mount Pleasant Neighbourhood Houses: A Sturdier Neighbourhood Fabric: Weaving Policy, People and Place Together

The project will connect diverse residents of Mount Pleasant more deeply to their local area, while enlarging their capacity to positively influence the way in which Mount Pleasant develops. The need was identified through participation in the local area planning process (2007-10); consultation (2011-12) with City staff and simultaneously with grassroots groups (focused on public realm, food security, community development and the arts), local business and service agencies; plus research from external bodies. The project (over 3 years) will develop and implement collaborative skills modules for policy-focused Working Groups; coordinate and support efforts of local area stakeholders through policy implementation regarding the built environment, public realm and social and economic development; facilitate effective partnership with municipal staff and academic teams in implementing the Mount Pleasant Community Plan; develop effective protocol for early engagement of local stakeholders by property developers; and create a toolkit to benefit multiple neighbourhoods and municipalities.
$100,000.00
2012

Coast Foundation Society (1974)

Let's Get Cooking

Coast Mental Health has approached Inner City Youth and Vancouver Community College to form a partnership which would develop and present an educational cooking program for street and at risk of homelessness youth with mental illness. Vancouver Community College will design a cooking program especially for this population and their learning needs. Beginning in January 2013, Let’s Get Cooking will develop the youths’ food preparation and technical cooking skills and enhance their confidence and social skills. It will be a low barrier program so that the youth with mental illness can participate when they are able. Inner City Youth and Coast Mental Health social workers and psychiatrists will work with the youth to encourage their participation, support them in their recovery and in developing acceptable work behaviors. The youth with mental illness will be supported by the Coast Coordinator and Peers (people with lived experience of mental illness) to succeed in the college course, to seek employment, and to move from the street or transitional housing to permanent housing.
$100,000.00
2012

Coast Mental Health Foundation

Low Barrier Employment for People with Mental Illness

For the past 30 years, Coast Mental Health has operated supported employment programs for people with severe mental illness. We have observed the difficulty people with severe mental illness have in returning to work due to the symptoms of their illness, their medication and their lack of confidence. Coast has seen that opportunities to work need to have structured expectations but offer the client flexibility, time to practice good work skills and to become accustomed to working. In 2009,Coast had the opportunity to develop a new low barrier employment program, the” Street Cleaning Crew” with funding from the City of Vancouver. The project hires and trains people with mental illness in skills required to clean community sidewalks, gutters and alleys of refuse and debris. The workers are supported by Peer Support Workers and supervised on the job by project staff until they regain their independent work skills. Once they reach that point the clients are encourage to find other paid employment if that is appropriate for their health.
$90,000.00
2012

College of New Caledonia

Vanderhoof Youth Centre

The Youth Centre is an unexpected outcome of the Vanderhoof Diversity Project’s Neighbourhood Space (NS). Youth started frequenting the space and in 2011, as requested by members of the community, CNC pursued funding to formalize the Youth Centre. Several of the youth who frequent the centre have extremely high needs and little to no formal support. There are equal amounts of First Nations and non First Nations that use the NS. It is a very diverse atmosphere - youth at risk form a large part of the cross section. Our funding request is to hire a part time Youth Development Coordinator (YDC) to assist the existing Youth Support Worker (YSW) and to assist with covering other admin costs (see budget). The YSW, also a part time position, provides a social or holistic support role for youth as well as being responsible for various administrative functions leaving little time to expand youth programming. In order to fill the gap of much needed program development and coordination, the new YDC’s role will be to work with the youth to develop programs, training, and activities for youth.
$90,000.00
2012

Family Services of Greater Vancouver

Promoting Upstream Solutions for BC's Children and Youth

Working closely with our coalition partner organizations, First Call will undertake to strengthen and support the collective voice for the rights and well-being of BC's children and youth. The project will use 3 strategies, public education (including conducting research and disseminating/popularizing others' research), mobilizing communities and individuals through workshops, presentations, media work, toolkits, web resources, e-alerts, etc.) and direct public policy advocacy in collaboration with our partner organizations and communities (briefs, letters, reports, candidate surveys, convening/facilitating discussions among advocates and with decision-makers and policy 'influencers'). Some of the key issues these activities will address are the unacceptably high rates of child and family poverty in BC and our proposed solutions, the need for improved protections for children in BC's labour force, the need to reduce exposures to environmental toxins affecting children's health, and the crucial importance of increasing our investments in early childhood and supporting young families.
$100,000.00
2012

Native Courtworker & Counselling Association of B.C.

Strengthening Aboriginal Women's Project

Strengthening Aboriginal Women’s Project hopes to facilitate an end to the "revolving door" of domestic abuse by securing a Case Worker who will offer specialized, culturally appropriate assistance that promotes independent living for 30 Aboriginal women annually. The Case Worker will advocate on her clients' behalf for systemic change within the community. Utilizing a Case Management Model with corresponding principles and ethics, and presented within an Aboriginal cultural context, this project will fill a gap in community services in Prince George by helping Aboriginal women navigate available systems of care in a manner that is mindful of historical and institutional barriers that often lead to trauma and instil a fear in these women that impact their ability to engage in those same systems of care. In order to effectively address the root causes of that fear, an emphasis will be placed on increasing the administrative and self-management tools required to have a successful outcome as well as on working with community stakeholders to address existing barriers to accessing care.
$91,000.00
2012

Network of Inner City Community Services Society

Vancouver Rent Bank

NICCSS is proposing a Vancouver Rent Bank Loan Fund with an initial 3-year mandate. This fund will build on the existing supports available in neighbourhoods in Vancouver with a high proportion of renters, and complement the City of Vancouver's Housing and Homelessness Strategy (2012- 2021) and the work of the StreetoHome Foundation. The fund will gain from the experience of existing Rent Banks in British Columbia, including NICCSS existing iRENT Bank program that is already being offered to families in the DTES, Strathcona and Hastings Corridor area of Vancouver. The Vancouver Rent Bank will allow low-income residents across the City, who are in temporary financial crisis and about to lose their housing, to access interest free emergency loans to address rent shortfalls and utilities arrears and deposits thus preventing their eviction. The Vancouver Rent Bank will provide financial literacy education (with VanCity Foundation) and connections to a network of neighbourhood agency partners that can support loan recipients based on their current needs and ensure continuity of support.
$90,000.00
2012

Positive Living Society of British Columbia

Stigma and access to health information in certain marginalized HIV communities (Mr. R. Paul Kerston/Dr. Mario Brondani)

HIV stigma may prevent people from being timely diagnosed and engaging in life-saving care. It may also prevent those who are HIV positive from seeking health educational information and services, particularly if they are from marginalized communities. To minimize stigma and to engage HIV-positive individuals in utilizing educational and support services, we need a good understanding of the roots of stigma and of the resources these community members need. Stigma can have many forms and be manifested in different manners. Despite the advance of readily available information and media, stigma remains held by the lay public and experienced by HIV marginalized individuals from Aboriginal communities and those who are refugee/immigrants, as the focus of this proposal. Within a community-based participatory research framework (CBPR), this proposed 2-year project will explore inductively the roots of stigma as experienced by HIV-positive members from these two marginalized communities, gathered in group discussions, and as held by lay individuals from the general public who are HIV-negative, gathered individually. The focus groups will be peer-led by volunteer trainees. Through collaborative thematic analysis from group discussions and interviews, this CBPR will enable us to identify the factors contributing to stigma and the educational and service needs of these marginalized communities. It will also inform the development of strategies to address and minimize stigma.
$94,425.00
2012

School District #67 - Okanagan Skaha

Through A Different Lens

The two components of our project are to expand the number of teachers using innovative teaching and assessment practices which are allowing students to use their preferred method of demonstrating their learning; and to build the capacity of these teachers to assess the intended learning outcomes regardless of the methods students choose. Each of these components require four steps: 1) the introduction of teaching and assessment strategies to allow for alternate demonstrations of understanding in regular classroom practice, 2) The implementation of new instructional and assessment methods, which will involve coaching by the lead teachers as well as side-by-side teaching, 3) the evalution of the implementation process, and 4) the readjusting of instruction and assessments. Our project is currently being implemented with groups of teachers from 6 schools: 2 elementary (k-5), 2 middle (6-8) and 2 secondary (9-12). In Year 2, we would like to increase the number of teachers involved at each of these six schools, and if possible increase the number of schools.
$100,000.00
2012

Victoria Disability Resource Centre

A GPS to Meaningful Employment for Persons with Disabilities

We want to create a continuum of sevices that will resutl in concrete systemic change and facilitate the employability of persons with disabilities. An individualized, non-prescriptive approach will encompass the entire process of reaching sustainable employment. This model will begin with a comprehensive person centred planning process that addresses barriers the individual encounters. Clients will be provided with a facilitated strategic planning process. Then the client will be matched with a mentor who will support them towards their employability goal. Secondarily, the VDRC has a history of facilitating disability awareness training with various stakeholders. However, this training has not been designed specifically with a focus on employment issues. We intend to modify this training to increase employers' awareness of and comfort level with addressing disability issues. Following the training, we will develop a workplace based mentorship program so that there is cross learning between the employer and person(s) with disabilities. Also, to follow on the work developed with employers by the Community Council's Quality of Life Challenge, we would develop a community based employer network interested in addressing systemic issues related to disability.
$100,000.00
2012