Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

Ladysmith Family and Friends (LaFF)

LaFF Around Town - Connecting Families to Services and Strengthening Belonging

The idea behind LaFF Around Town is to consistently provide LaFF programming on weekends and evenings and in locations throughout the community to provide multiple points of access to be inclusive of as many families as possible. The idea originated through consultation with families who expressed the desire to strengthen their connection to the community, and through feedback from service providers showing that some vulnerable families were not accessing services. We will create a quarterly Calendar of Events promoting all local events for children ages 0-6 and their families hosted by LaFF and other member agencies of the Ladysmith Early Years Partnership (LEYP). The Calendar will be inserted into every Leisure Guide published and distributed by the Town of Ladysmith and will be inserted into other local print media. The Calendar will also be distributed through LaFF’s electronic newsletter, posted on our website, Facebook and in other social media as appropriate to ensure maximum access to community-based programs and services by the broadest possible audience of families.
$10,000.00
2012

Langley Community Services Society

Langley Neighbourhood Development Project

Over the past year, senior managers of Langley non-profit and Government service providers have worked together to develop an overarching strategic plan for services based on demographic data, community parent surveys and input from youth, early childhood, special needs and middle childhood groups. This strategic plan was developed and reviewed by staff working in the community, and representatives of the faith, Aboriginal and multicultural communities. Our next steps are to engage the broader community (e.g. business and other community groups) as well as parents and youth to complete an asset inventory. We will engage neighbourhood to discuss local and community assets and how to best fill immediate gaps for children, youth and families. We are requesting funding tol support this process and start up of services.
$30,000.00
2012

Leave Out Violence "LOVE"

LOVE VOICES

$49,050.00
2012

Lionsview Seniors' Planning Society

Seniors Today: Building a Better Tomorrow, Phase Three

Based on a Seniors Survey results document and consultation phase which involved a series of interactive workshops to discuss the survey results and ascertain priorities to be addressed, the project intends to: 1) Engage action orientated seniors (both survey respondents and workshop participants), community and business stakeholders and other motivated seniors in determining how North Shore communities can provide the environment, supports and services seniors need to age well in place (these might include care giving, non-medical and medical home supports, accessible transportation, supports for preventing and overcoming isolation and education about housing options as people age); 2) Using the World Health Organization's 'Age Friendly Framework', whose approach seeks to gather input on what seniors need to remain healthy, happy, independent and connected to each other and their community, create, set up and implement locally based Seniors Action Tables (SATS) coordinated by LionsView Seniors Planning Society in order to create 'Age Friendly Action' plans and initiatives.
$10,000.00
2012

Lower Mainland Purpose Society for Youth and Families

Burnaby Youth Hub Support Project

The Burnaby Youth Hub opened in 2010 to give vulnerable youth easier access to educational, health and therapeutic services. A range of services previously scattered throughout Burnaby are now offered in one warm and welcoming location. Your support would help maintain the position of a Coordinator to facilitate this one-stop shop of services. Services are offered by individual agencies and organizations that collaborate to customize support for youth with multiple needs. These youth are not connected to the community and the Hub offers them opportunities for better life chances, greater economic independence and ensures they are living out of harms way. Services include an educational program, clinic, youth centre, counselling and job readiness and skills training and other services. Government, non-profit and community agencies work together to help each youth reach their potential. The Coordinator supports youth, service providers and staff, provides oversight of the network of agencies at the Hub, attends to physical plant issues and promotes the Hub to the community.
$60,000.00
2012

Lower Similkameen

The LSIB Riparian Stewardship Workshops

Six hands-on workshops take members of LSIB onto the land for riparian restoration. The project originated from the desire to combine much-needed restoration work with education to increase community capacity. Need is two-fold: (1) As stewards of the largest intact riparian matrix in the South Okanagan, we need to build internal capacity to fulfill our traditional role of caring for the land. (2) A significant stretch along the Similkameen River has been badly damaged by erosion and is caught in an escalating cycle that reduces water quality and destroys increasingly rare habitat upon which many species at risk depend. Members of LSIB have a strong commitment to land stewardship. Our active TEK committee includes young people as well as Elders. Workshops will also be open to local conservation organizations. Workshops will bring together ecological experts and traditional knowledge keepers to assist community members to assess the target area, develop a stabilization plan, remove invasive species, and undertake indigenous planting to restore habitat and improve bank stability.
$15,000.00
2012

Lush Valley Food Action Society

Young Cooks Caring

In a welcoming and nurturing environment, our project will work with children and youth who have a parent with a mental illness/dual diagnosis. These families with complex needs may be involved with a range of mental health and social services, but nothing is available specifically for the children of these families and their unique needs. One typical challenge these children face is role reversal – when a child acts as a parent, an example is grocery shopping and cooking when Mom is not feeling well. They may feel shamed into silence about their parent’s condition, feeling alone and isolated because of the stigma and prejudices surrounding mental illness. This program will provide these children an opportunity to explore the local food system and develop cooking skills while enjoying the companionship of children from a similar background. There will be 7-10 participants per growing and harvesting season (youth ranging from 11-16 years old).
$14,000.00
2012

Malaspina Printmakers Society

Residential Schools Exhibition, (formal title is pending)

In September 2013 The Truth and Reconciliation Commission will meet in Vancouver to conclude its five year mandate of listening to the stories of aboriginal people across Canada, pertaining to their experience in the Indian Residential Schools. These Final Dialogues will bring to a conclusion the retelling of a very painful part of Canadian history that has had little airing in the past 150 years. Discussing the truth will be one part of it. Malaspina intends to also act within the Reconciliation aspect. It is our intention to mount an exhibition of Aboriginal work in three separate locations: the Malaspina Gallery, the Concourse Gallery of Emily Carr University and the Urban Aboriginal Fair Trade Gallery, between 16 and 30 of Sept, 2013. The work would depict images associated with the Aboriginal experience of the Indian Residential Schools. The work will be done by people who directly experienced this trauma as well as those from successive generations who are still affected by it. The show will coincide with the Commission's Final Dialogues, Sept 18-21, 2013
$12,000.00
2012

MISCELLANEOUS Productions

Kutz & Dawgs BC Regional Tour - Year One

Tour, HD video documentation, free webcast/screenings, evaluation with Social Psychologist Dr. George Tien. Reach larger audience in cities where gangs flourish and provide youth artists with professional tour experience. Our professional team and performing arts youth will co-lead theatre, dance and hip hop music workshops and film screenings for at-risk youth in Surrey, Kelowna and Prince George with facilitated discussion and work with UBC Okanagan Theatre Department to present events with and for students and faculty. Tour will develop artistic skills of professional team and youth cast, show leadership and innovation in community-engaged theatre and open doorways to arts careers. Professional HD video crew will document/edit Kutz & Dawgs performances. Screenings/webcasts presented before each workshop. Social media will enable youth audience members to communicate with performers and professionals, interaction with fans, workshop participants, students and access to urban music from our play. In 3 cities, will set up a larger tour of the play in 2013 - 2014 for Year 2.
$30,000.00
2012

Mountainaire Avian Rescue Society

A Way Forward - Building Organizational Capacity

This project has two parts. Part 1 will undertake strategic planning to address the need for: · Succession and management plan to replace the manager, also the rehabilitator and founder of our organization, who is due to retire in the next few years · Plan to secure long term occupancy of our rental premises · Upgrading of premises to accommodate interns who live on site between April and October every year · Renovations and construction for wildlife care including larger flight pen to rehabilitate raptors Part 2 will strengthen our social media activity, including: · Website development · Development of a social media plan, related policies and a social media marketing plan · Improvement of database management system
$8,000.00
2012

Multi-Lingual Orientation Service Association for Immigrant Communities

NuYu Popular Theatre Project

The NuYu program seeks to share our model with more people, most importantly with more immigrant and refugee youth. To do this we realize community capacity building is the best way, to train more youth workers and youth leaders in Popular Theatre(PT) Facilitation so more communities can benefit from this creative, transformative & effective methodology. In order to achieve this, the NuYu Project will partner with an existing youth program in the city of Vancouver to build community capacity through a PT Facilitation Training for youth/community workers and youth leaders serving immigrant communities. Furthermore, we will also work with this partner program to collaboratively deliver PT programming by and for immigrant and refugee youth, thereby strengthening the existing programs' effectiveness as well as building the sustainability of community theatre for immigrant communities in Metro Vancouver. In this way, participants & partners will be able to continue using PT on their own as an excellent tool for working with immigrant and refugee youth. (As achieved in New Westminster).
$40,000.00
2012

Multicultural Helping House Society

MHHS Youth Buddy Program

This comprehensive service innovation program brings out the imagination, passion and dynamism of the young participants to develop a positive self-concept that will boost self-confidence, effective social interaction and communication skills, team-building skills, leadership abilities, community service trait and personal responsibilities be it in school or at home. Key elements of the program include experiential activities, peer coaching sessions, service learning activities, indoor workshops, family outreach, parent education, mental, emotional and behavioural health consultations, referrals, elder dialogue, open forum with politicians, drug rehabilitation and alcoholism centres information sessions and visitations.
$15,000.00
2012

Museum of Vancouver

UPCYCLED URBANISM: An Everyday Design Assemblage

Upcycled Urbanism is a participatory art project that will invite artists, designers, makers and laypeople to reimagine Vancouver's public art and amenities, as well as invite them to become part of Vancouver's evolving design culture. Working together, participants will design and build their own public art or amenity prototypes using large blocks of polystyrene salvaged from the construction of the Port Mann Bridge. A series of workshops will culminate in an outdoor design/build event where the wider community will be invited to critique and encourage the builders. Sculptures will be displayed at Mini Maker Faire in June and other public venues. Multimedia documentation will be shared online, and through partners' extensive social media networks. Learnings and lessons from the workshops and build event will then be shared at a public forum. Material will be recycled for industrial use.
$6,990.00
2012

Sex Talk in the City

Sex Talk in the City is a multifaceted health promotion and prevention project that explores sexuality currently and in Vancouver's past. It engages the public with topics of sexual health, sexual diversity and sex education. The project demonstrates that human sexuality is not only biological, but also cultural and political, and that it is widely connected to issues of human rights, individual choice and societal health. This multi-partner project includes a 6 month public exhibition, a health promotions campaign, a queer youth component, and collaborative research. It will create a safe and engaging place for the public to learn what it means, for individuals and society, to live a sex positive and informed lifestyle. The Museum of Vancouver, as a public institution, will de-stigmatize conversations about sexuality through public engagement and experiential learning. The project aims to empower participants with the language and knowledge to make informed choices about their identity and sexuality, influencing their readiness for change.
$10,000.00
2012

Nanaimo Festival Heritage/Theatre Societ TheatreOne

The Ginger Goodwin Project

TheatreOne aims to develop and produce a new play based on the life of coal miner and labour activist Albert "Ginger" Goodwin, an iconic figure to many British Columbians especially those whose parents and grandparents were caught up in the struggle for fair and safe working conditions when coal mines on Vancouver Island and across the country were at their peak. We're now working toward a 6 day workshop with playwright Michael Stephen and 5 professional actors in July 2012. We'll need funding to follow-up with a 3-day workshop in Nov. and to take the play through to a full production in April 2013. The Ginger Goodwin Story has been conceived as an ensemble piece; a core group of actors will play all the parts. During the workshop we will explore every aspect of the script and how the ensemble can best be utilized. Between Nov. and Mar. the writer will channel what we discover into work on a final draft . Production will include a large cast and crew, and a projection based set design using archival photographs to evoke the historical context, and set each scene with ease.
$10,000.00
2012

Nanaimo Science and Sustainability Society

Science on the Move-Early Years

NS3’s Science on the Move-Early Years programs will be series of science outreach programs specifically for children ages 0-7 delivered through our mobile science van. This outreach will engage children and families via experiments, hands-on activities, and traveling educators. The idea for mobile science outreach originated during NS3’s vision workshop (fall 2011) where local stakeholders and NS3 identified community needs and the action steps to address those needs. NS3 then gathered more than 30 scientists to generate local themes and activities for NS3’s place-based science outreach, and partnered with the City of Nanaimo’s Parks, Recreation and Culture to deliver 36 free science outreach programs this summer (Science in the Park). Science in the Park successfully reached 1,600 kids, many who would not be able to afford similar education. Based on program feedback, NS3 identified a new target audience for fun science-based programs, families with young children. Science on the Move-Early Years will provide hands-on science to 1,500 children in 2013.
$20,000.00
2012

Narrative 360

Ocean Falls Reunion

At its heart, this is a reunion of former residents of Ocean Falls, currently a remote ghost town on the northern BC coast. It was shattered as a community in 1981 due to the paper mill closure. By 1985, it was physically destroyed. The project begins with the creation of two or more electronic social media sites to provide former Ocean Falls residents with means to reconnect with each other and share memories, pictures, newspaper clips etc. We will place ads in community newspapers. We will also provide a telephone number for offline communication and to record audio memories. The memories sharing and collection phase will last 6 to 8 months. The actual reunion and public events, including seminars, will take place at the Roundhouse Community Centre. Approximately 30 of Christopher Grabowski's large format contemporary photographs of Ocean Falls will be combined with pictures, documents and artifacts added by community members. The event, and the 'new' exhibit will be documented as a web exhibit, along with portraits of community members taken at the reunion.
$7,500.00
2012

Native Courtworker & Counselling Association of B.C.

Strengthening Aboriginal Women's Project

Strengthening Aboriginal Women’s Project hopes to facilitate an end to the "revolving door" of domestic abuse by securing a Case Worker who will offer specialized, culturally appropriate assistance that promotes independent living for 30 Aboriginal women annually. The Case Worker will advocate on her clients' behalf for systemic change within the community. Utilizing a Case Management Model with corresponding principles and ethics, and presented within an Aboriginal cultural context, this project will fill a gap in community services in Prince George by helping Aboriginal women navigate available systems of care in a manner that is mindful of historical and institutional barriers that often lead to trauma and instil a fear in these women that impact their ability to engage in those same systems of care. In order to effectively address the root causes of that fear, an emphasis will be placed on increasing the administrative and self-management tools required to have a successful outcome as well as on working with community stakeholders to address existing barriers to accessing care.
$91,000.00
2012

Nature Conservancy of Canada

Community Engagement in Species at Risk Recovery

NCC is actively engaged in protecting and stewarding habitat for species at risk in British Columbia with the objective of avoiding further extinctions. In some cases, we have an opportunity to reintroduce species to areas where they formerly occurred but have become locally extirpated. Doing so dramatically enhances the chances that these species will recover to self-sustaining, viable populations over the long term. If reintroductions can be accomplished with active participation from local communities including school-aged children and families a broader base of support for habitat protection and stewardship within local communities where species at risk occur can develop. NCC is a national leader in species at risk re-introductions. Through NCC’s Conservation Volunteer program, we will host at least five events on at least three of our conservation areas in the Salish Sea region. These events will engage local communities in our efforts to reintroduce species at risk.
$15,000.00
2012

Neighbourlink Vanderhoof

Best Moms and Dads Program

Activities are participant generated and a broad range of free literacy tutoring is provided. (Financial literacy, math, reading and cultural activities). The program is innovative, grassroots, and flexible enough to meet clients where they are in their lives. Program structure, outcomes, and goals are different for each participant depending on their need. While the small group size allows us to offer individual education plans in a group setting, the focus for all participants is parenting, budgeting, nutrition, lifestyle choices and literacy. Local groups involved in early education programs realise that those who most need their services are not accessing them. A need for 'pre-programming' targetting young, single mothers (or fathers) of (mainly) aboriginal ancestry was identified. Many participants are the second or third generation of unemployed, marginalized, under‐educated, impoverished people locked into a seemingly unbreakable cycle of poverty.
$20,000.00
2012

Network of Inner City Community Services Society

Vancouver Rent Bank

NICCSS is proposing a Vancouver Rent Bank Loan Fund with an initial 3-year mandate. This fund will build on the existing supports available in neighbourhoods in Vancouver with a high proportion of renters, and complement the City of Vancouver's Housing and Homelessness Strategy (2012- 2021) and the work of the StreetoHome Foundation. The fund will gain from the experience of existing Rent Banks in British Columbia, including NICCSS existing iRENT Bank program that is already being offered to families in the DTES, Strathcona and Hastings Corridor area of Vancouver. The Vancouver Rent Bank will allow low-income residents across the City, who are in temporary financial crisis and about to lose their housing, to access interest free emergency loans to address rent shortfalls and utilities arrears and deposits thus preventing their eviction. The Vancouver Rent Bank will provide financial literacy education (with VanCity Foundation) and connections to a network of neighbourhood agency partners that can support loan recipients based on their current needs and ensure continuity of support.
$90,000.00
2012

North Cariboo Aboriginal Family Program

Making Quesnel Age-Friendly

The idea for this project originated during the annual planning process of the Adult Services Team, a group of community adult services providers and interested seniors that collaborates to identify and meet service issues/gaps of the target client group (seniors & vulnerable adults), and the project has been developed with the participation of this group. We also researched several reports and recommendations on age-friendly communities to develop this project. Several key issues facing seniors were determined to be related to a lack of overall community capacity to meet needs specific to seniors and other vulnerable adults. Our project will serve seniors and other vulnerable adults, including Aboriginal Elders, in our region, paying particular attention to isolated seniors. The project will increase the age friendliness of our community through a variety of prioritized initiatives. These initiatives will increase the community's awareness of and adaptation to seniors' needs and will increase seniors' access to services and activities that contribute to their health and well-being.
$21,300.00
2012

North Kootenay Lake Community Services Society

Boys' Town

The population the Boys' Town Project would serve is boys aged 8 to 12 yrs old - providing them with supportive, positive activities with safe adult male mentors. Kaslo has a significant number of boys this age with special needs, who are attention seeking, often female single parented, and generally lacking a positive male presence in their lives. This project will build upon a 2011-2012 pilot project that demonstrated that using positive adult-child relationships to strengthen attachment and resilience and removing barriers to activities (e.g. financial, social) to increase social inclusion and healthy activity, has a positive effect on boys. Starting January 2013, we intend to increase the engagement of 8 to 12 yr. old at-risk boys in weekly mentored transformative activities in an after-school setting. Boys will be assisted to create personal plans. To improve the capacity of our community to successfully mentor boys, the project coordinator will facilitate a series of mentor training workshops and provide follow-up mentor support, connecting safe adult mentors with at-risk boys.
$15,000.00
2012

North Shore Multicultural Society

NEONOLOGY 2.0

NEONOLOGY 2.0 emerged from the success of the NEONOLOGY Initiative. Under the direction of NSWAC (NS immigrant planning table - 17 orgs), NSMS developed NEONOLOGY as a model of best practices in diversity and anti-oppression education. NEONOLOGY has engaged more than 3000 grade 10 students in workshops exploring power, privilege, stereotypes, and the underlying causes of discrimination. Over 80% of these students indicated that the workshops increased their understanding of discrimination and its impact on the community. Students and teachers urged NSMS staff to offer a similar workshop to younger students, saying that students need to understand issues of diversity before entering high school. Research confirmed discrimination and isolation as risk factors for NS children preparing for high school1. In response to this need NSMS will deliver NEONOLOGY 2.0, a program engaging grade 6/7 students in developmentally appropriate anti-oppression and anti-bullying themed workshops in their classrooms. Students in grades 10-12 will be trained to provide mentorship to the grade 6/7 student.
$60,000.00
2012

Nuu-chah-nulthaht/WCVI Aquatic Management Society

The Future is Born from the Seeds of the Past

West Coast Aquatic Management Society proposes an intergenerational leadership project that brings together successful people who have a strong connection to the West Coast of Vancouver Island with young First Nations who show leadership capacity. The program will provide an opportunity for leaders to mentor youth in business, governance, management and science, thus building bridges between generations and building capacity in the region. One of the key opportunities that WCA has identified in its extensive consultations is building capacity of young leaders in the region by connecting them with leaders. Traditionally NTC youth were involved in mentorships (haa-huu-paa), but that system was broken by the residential schools. We believe that good leadership is key to making things happen. Part of leadership is passing on the wisdom from those who have been successful to those who will be successful. Mentorships that are created in response to specific community needs and the mutual interests of the mentor and apprentice will benefit everyone.
$45,000.00
2012

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