Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

University of British Columbia

Mathematics First Nations and Inner City K -12 outreach

This project focuses on enabling inner city aboriginal youths in the Lower Mainland and at First Nations schools throughout BC to acquire the necessary mathematical skills to enroll in post-secondary programs in science, engineering and other technical professions. This will be achieved through a combination of activities targeting both students and teachers, including summer math camps, mentorship programs, homework clubs and teacher training workshops. In Vancouver, a year-round support network will be established for at-risk students, including: tutoring by undergraduate mentors, homework clubs and summer math camps. There will be a camp for students transitioning into high school and a separate one for seniors, where students will have an opportunity to work with scientists and other faculty at UBC. Summer camps and mentorship programs will be further expanded to First Nations schools throughout BC. In addition, regular teacher training workshops on mathematics will be organized both in Vancouver and at several First Nations schools, seeking to enhance teaching skills.
$60,000.00
2012

Communicating the Case for A New Deal for Families: Phase 2

This project builds on an existing partnership between the Vancouver Foundation, the UBC Human Early Learning Partnership, the United Way of the Lower Mainland and the YWCA of Metro Vancouver. The project aims to transform research into action to address many of the time, income, service and environmental challenges that confront Vancouver families with young children in all their diversity. Previous research shows that the standard of living for the generation raising young children has deteriorated significantly. The same research reveals that public policy has been slow to adapt. This is a bad deal for families. In the absence of policy adaption, over 30 per cent of local children start school vulnerable. Early vulnerability compromises childhood, and has adverse consequences for children’s future school achievement, health, risk of incarceration, and employment success. There is now compelling research to move from a bad deal to a New Deal for Families, including local, national and global evidence about the required policy changes. (see full document for details).
$75,000.00
2012

University of British Columbia - Faculty of Medicine

We Want to be Healthy: A Community Engagement Strategy to Enhance Foreign-Born, Older Adult Health and Mobility (Dr. Joanie Sims-Gould)

SVNH has been serving the needs of older adults since 1977 and has developed a strong foundation of services, supports and community engagement activities. In an ongoing effort to serve older adults, SVNH is currently leading the Seniors Hub project. The goal of the Seniors Hub project (Hub) is to create a sustainable network of programs and services to support older adults at the neighbourhood level. Through consultations with SVNH staff, the South Vancouver Seniors' Advisory Council (SAC), local seniors centres/organizations in the SVNH catchment and older adults, priorities for the Hub include understanding the needs and reaching out to under-served foreign-born populations in South East Vancouver (e.g. Vietnamese, Filipino, and Tamil seniors). In response to these identified priorities, we are particularly interested in better understanding the health and mobility needs of the under-served foreign-born older adults living in the SVNH catchment. We know that there are important and significant associations between the design of neighbourhoods, where older adults live and their ability to move within their neighbourhood. The goal of this project will be to better understand the specific health and mobility needs of foreign-born older adults in the SVNH catchment.
$153,087.00
2012

Understanding smoking cessation behaviour in Vancouver's Chinese Communities (Dr. Mark Fitzgerald/Ms. Eliza Chang)

For numerous reasons, minority and immigrant communities in Canada may be at greater risk of smoking-related illnesses. This is particularly true among immigrants from Mandarin and Cantonese-speaking communities, where smoking rates remain disproportionately high. To date, millions have been spent on developing smoking cessation interventions, but their effectiveness in diverse cultural communities has been limited, likely because of a variety of social and cultural factors. Through a series of recent focus groups, representatives of Vancouver's Chinese communities have expressed a need for more culturally sensitive strategies to support smoking cessation in their community. We plan to address this need by using community-based participatory approaches to generate new knowledge about why smokers in Vancouver's Chinese communities continue to smoke and what their smoking cessation needs are. Our study will apply a community-academia coalition model, in which a Community Advisory Council (CAC) comprising of representatives from the Chinese community including smokers and non smokers, community key-informants (well-known socially influential/ respected individuals from the Mandarin-speaking and Cantonese-speaking communities), professional groups, and knowledge-users will oversee the project. Our findings will inform the creation of community-driven culturally appropriate resources aimed at reducing smoking rates (and therefore chronic lung & heart diseases) in these communities Research Team: Milan Khara, Tobacco Dependence Clinic; Iraj Poureslami, UBC; Stephem Lam, Lung Tumour Group; Maylene Fong, Evergreen; Ka Wai Cheung, UBC; Farzaneh Osati, Canadian Multicultural Health Promotion Society
$75,000.00
2012

Prevention Matters: Reducing the Diabetes Burden in the South Asian Community (Dr. Tricia Tang/Mr. Paul Bains)

In British Columbia (BC), compared to other ethnic groups, South Asians (SAs) have the highest incidence of diabetes and have a greater risk of developing macrovascular complications [1]. BC has the second largest population of SAs in Canada and is home to approximately 168,000 residents of this visible minority group, most of whom reside in the Greater Vancouver Area. Dr. Tang has been actively involved in community-level efforts to reduce diabetes-related health disparities in Vancouver. Community feedback from her current study investigating the use of peer support to improve diabetes management revealed a critical need for initiatives also targeting DIABETES PREVENTION. In direct response, this project aims to answer the question: What are the facilitators and barriers to lifestyle change for diabetes prevention in Vancouver's SA community? By partnering with an extensive network of Gurudwaras/Mandirs and equipping community members with core research skills, we will have the infrastructure and workforce to launch a lifestyle modification 'needs assessment' involving community-wide 'diabetes risk' screenings, follow-up 'risk reduction' feedback forums, dietary and exercise assessments, focus groups, semi-structured interviews, and a SA risk registry. Knowledge gained from this study will inform the development of culturally appropriate interventions specifically tailored to address the unique challenges of Vancouver's SA community. Research Team: Arun Kumar Garg, Fraser Health; Indpreet Dharni, UBC School of Medicine; Jatinder Singh Suden, VA Kesri Publishers; Paul Bains, Pacifica Partners; Harmeet Mundra, Fraser Health; Jatinder Jati Sidhu, Greenvale Enterprises; Dr. Parmjit Sohal; Tricia Tang, UBC School of Medicine
$227,419.00
2012

Burn survivor quality of life in British Columbia: challenges and opportunities (Dr. Anthony Papp/Ms. Lisa Lacamell)

The objective of this research is to identify the fundamental barriers and facilitators to recovery and reintegration back into work and society among burn survivors living in British Columbia. Considerable research has shown that burn-related injury is a significant contributor to both short- and long-term physical, cognitive, behavioral, and emotional impairments that have significant consequences on individuals, their families, and society at-large. However, we have very limited information about what factors influence the recovery and reintegration of BC’s burn survivor community despite the fact that burn-related injury is a leading cause of injury morbidity across the province. This gap significantly reduces the ability to understand the type of contexts that help populations recover following injury. In recent years, advancements in trauma care have led to tremendous decreases in mortality and reduced hospital length of stay. Unfortunately, the consequences of these improvements are that patients must now face many responsibilities for their care on their own. As such, it is important to obtain information about the resources and social environments that fundamentally contribute to recovery. As many injury survivors likely face similar barriers to recovery, it is important that these information is drawn from narratives from individual survivors to identify how best to strengthen local resource infrastructures. Research Team: Nathaniel Bell, UBC; Heidi Cave, Author; Anthony Papp, BC Professional Firefighters' Burn Unit; Lisa Lacamell, BCPFF Burn Fund
$63,178.00
2012

University of British Columbia College of Health Disciplines

Improving care for vulnerable populations through their participation in the education of health professionals (Dr. Angela Towle)

Vulnerable and marginalized populations have problems with access to health care, communication with health professionals and receipt of patient-centred care that goes beyond a bio-medical approach. These problems can be addressed by active involvement of people in the community, who are ‘experts by lived experience’, in the education of health professionals. However, there are major institutional and cultural barriers to the inclusion of vulnerable people as educators, including different understandings of knowledge and expertise, power imbalances, discrimination and stigma, and lack of trust. We propose a knowledge interaction research project that will influence educational policy and practice. The goal is to make the authentic and autonomous voice and expertise of the patient a core part of the education of health professionals. We propose a 3-year inclusive and iterative community-based participatory research project that will inform i) the development of a mechanism for the community to engage with the university for the purpose of influencing health professional education; and ii) the development, implementation and evaluation of an educational model that leads to sustained participation by vulnerable and marginalized populations in the education of health professionals. The project will benefit the community through its ability to influence its future health and social care, and benefit the university in fulfilling its mandate for socially accountable education. Research Team: Scott Graham SPARC; William Godolphin UBC; Cheryl hewitt, North Shore Health Board; Angela Towle UBC
$130,441.00
2012

University of British Columbia Department of Pediatrics

Youth ON TRAC: A Health Advocacy Voice for youth with chronic health conditions

Youth aging out of pediatric care report feeling abandoned and helpless in the adult health care system. ON TRAC, a collaborative initiative involving UBC, Child Health BC, BCMA, BC Children’s Hospital and health regions, aims to improve health transition for B.C. youth. Key to success is genuine community-based youth engagement and an active and empowered youth voice. Healthy outcomes for youth will be actualized when youth are involved, active participants in their health care. Youth ON TRAC will directly engage youth with chronic health conditions/disabilities (CHC/Ds) in all processes to create a new, relevant, meaningful, effective, authentic youth health advocacy voice through skills-building training to 1)co-create a needs assessment; 2)develop a youth-led “transition workshop template” and hold workshops; 3)develop online social mentorship; 4)provide education for youth/families; 5)inform health care decision makers on youth-friendly health care transition. Creation of a Provincial Youth Advisory Committee (YAC) within Patient Voices Network (PVN) will ensure sustainability.
$50,000.00
2012

University of British Columbia School of Nursing

Fostering Health & Human Rights: A Medical Legal Pilot Study (Judith Lynam, UBC/Kate Hodgon, Network of Inner City Community Services Society)

Our broad concern is to generate insights to foster child and family health equity. We are proposing to undertake research to to examine the ways structural violence operates in the day to day lives of children, youth & families living with marked social and material adversity in Vancouver's inner city. We propose to illustrate the impact of structural violence on health, child development & community well being and to use this analysis to inform the design of a Medical Legal Partnership (MLP). Structural violence refers to 'social structures-economic, political, legal...that stop individuals, groups and societies from reaching their full potential. The idea of structural violence is linked very closely to social injustice and the social machiner of oppression' (Farmer et al, 2004, 2006a,b). 'MLPs integrate legal services as a vital component of the healthcare team. Through direct service, transforming institutions and influencing policy change, MLPs address the non-medical, social determinants of health that have legal remedies' (MLP website). As such, this approach may assist the target community to address the systemic issues that contribute to the poor health profile of children and families. The research will provide the baseline data for an evidence-based approach for addressing structural violence and will inform the development of a strategy, a plan and a financial model. Research Team: Anthony Boardman, UBC Christine Loock, UBC; Lorine Scott, BC Children's Hospital;, Ronald G. Friesen, Continueing Legal Educaiton Society of BC; John Simpson, Legal Services Society
$71,257.00
2012

University of Northern British Columbia

Investigating bottlenecks and barriers to cancer care in Haida Gwaii (Dr. Robert Olson/Dr.Tracy Morton)

The project idea is in response to a specific request to the principal investigator from health care providers, on behalf of the people in Haida Gwaii, to address difficulties concerning cancer diagnosis and care in isolated Aboriginal communities. Not only does geographical isolation make it difficult to access tertiary services, but social and cultural factors form potential barriers to accessing cancer services. The health care providers identified a need for a comprehensive electronic database of their entire population, which will enable them to participate in health care improvements and research. A research team, comprised of experts in family practice, Aboriginal health, information technology, oncology, epidemiology and biostatistics will identify all patients with a histologically confirmed diagnosis of cancer in Haida Gwaii and collect demographic data, family and personal medical histories and lifestyle information for each patient. All data will be populated in a database that will allow for analysis to identify common delays in care, survival analysis and statistical comparisons of Aboriginal vs. non-Aboriginal patients for each outcome. This project has the potential to improve Aboriginal care in Haida Gwaii and other Aboriginal remote communities by identifying bottlenecks and barriers in care and advocating for measures to address these issues; through education and resource allocation.
$57,002.00
2012

From Front Door to Grocery Store: Getting seniors where they want to be (Dr. Greg Halseth/Ms. Leslie Groulx)

Rural BC is experiencing a rapidly aging population, and long-time residents are choosing to remain in their 'home' communities. Most of these communities face significant challenges in meeting the mobility needs of seniors, including harsh winters, poor physical infrastructure, and lack of services. Clearwater BC has made a commitment to becoming an age-friendly community. This project focuses on seniors mobility in the community. It emerged from a well-established partnership involving the CDI, the District of Clearwater and the Age-Friendly Community Committee, which is comprised of seniors organizations and organizations serving seniors. The research project will engage local seniors in an assessment of shopping and service areas, community facilities, walking routes, and transportation. These field sessions will be complemented by workshops to review, and increase awareness of, the issues. The project will also involve in-depth interviews to explore considerations such as safety, accessibility, affordability, inclusiveness, helpfulness, and respect. The final report from the project will include information and recommendations that can be used in planning and decision-making around mobility, an action plan, and the community mobility assessment tool that will be developed. This will be a resource that Clearwater can use into the future. It will also be distributed for use and adaptation by other communities in BC, Canada and beyond. Research Team: Greg Halseth, UNBC; Leslie Grouix, District of Clearwater; Donald Manson, UNBC; Neil Hanlon, UNBC; Dawn Hemingway, UNBC; Laura Ryser UNBC; Jessica Blewett, UNBC; Anne Hogan RDFFG;
$227,012.00
2012

Bridging the Cs: Community, Connectedness, and Collaborative partnerships to improve the Cardio-metabolic health of individuals with enduring mental illness. (Dr. Candida Graham/Ms. Nansi Long)

This project aims to answer the question: How do we help clients with enduring mental illness [EMI] achieve and maintain healthier lifestyles, decreasing their risks of cardio-metabolic disorders, through community, connectedness and collaboration? This project will not only empower clients to take action but also provide new research data on effective methods to overcome barriers, such as stigma, to improve health behaviours in clients with EMI. Using the themes of understanding, self-determination & client generated solutions the researchers will engage in an iterative process with this vulnerable & disadvantaged community to shape SMART (Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Realistic & Timely) health initiatives. The project will sequentially: 1.Invite engagement from clients in the review of preliminary study data 2.Explore client's internal & external factors, which lead to positive change in lifestyle 3.Shape & implement community lead health initiatives 4.Evaluate the initiative outcomes. Primary outcomes will be quantitative measures of change in health behaviours, work & social adjustment, community connectedness, quality of life, measures of self-determination & the characteristics of initiatives the community shape. The main hypothesis is that in line with self-determination theory, the empowerment of clients will lead to better engagement and continuance with lifestyle changes. Research Team: Crystal Rollings UNBC/UBC; Dr. Brenda Griffiths, Lesley Anderson, United Way; Lynn Smoliak, BC Schizophrenia Society; Sarah de leeuw, UNBC; Megan Davies, York University, Diane Purvey, Kwantlen Polytechnic University; Candida Graham, UNBC; Nansi Long, BC Schizophrenia Society
$236,762.00
2012

University of the Fraser Valley

S'iwes Totí:lt Q'ép - Teaching and Learning Together: Indigenizing the Academy

'Indigenizing the Academy' is about integrating and centering Indigenous people and their knowledge in education. Most post-secondary institutions adopt tenets of indigenization but still face administrative challenges related to curriculum, student experiences, governance, recruitment/retention of Indigenous faculty and students. The project idea arises from UFV's Education Plan, which recognizes the need to recruit/retain Indigenous faculty, maximize success of Indigenous students, and develop relations with Indigenous communities to benefit all students and universities. Members of Canadian post-secondary institutions will be served by this project, specifically senior administrators, staff/faculty, community stakeholders including Elders, education coordinators and Indigenous students. The project promotes knowledge exchange between institutions via: a two-day gathering of teams of institutional representatives on indigenization; a Stó:lo Sweat and Feast; DVDs from events; a cross-institutional audit; interactive website; and a manual of challenges and best practices.
$20,000.00
2012

University of Victoria - Faculty of Human and Social Development

Indigenous Child Well-being Training Initiative

UVic has developed an Indigenous Child Well-being Research Network and has piloted training for Indigenous communities on child well-being best practices for the last 2 years. Each training session is developed in advance with community input. The training supports the Indigenous knowledge inherent in the community engaging Elders, adults and youth to learn about positive Indigenous child well-being best practices in order to inform public policy at all levels. They want to know how the current system works and how they can become more independent eg. through Granny Clubs, youth mentorship groups, etc., in order to protect and keep their children in their own communities. The training facilitates knowledge mobilization and the adaptation of promising practices to local contexts. Cultural metaphors such as basket weaving, dip nets or disappearing oolichan fish are used to provide an appropriate cultural context grounded in respect, relevance, reciprocity and responsibility.
$50,000.00
2012

Valley Community Services

Building for a Stronger Community

The project for which we are requesting support is to renovate a building which we have purchased. This project will create a “Family Resource Centre” for the Creston community. It will allow us to amalgamate rented office space which will reduce annual operating costs and increase overall organizational sustainability. It will also provide us with improved space in which to deliver programming and increase accessibility to our co-located programmes and services.
$20,000.00
2012

Vancouver Chamber Choir

Eric Whitacre Conducts

This project wil give young choral singers the opportunity to work directly with Grammy award-winning composer, conductor and all-round champion of choral music Eric Whitacre, arguably one of the most popular and most-performed composers of his generation. Included in the project are preparatory rehearsals for the youth singers under the direction of Jon Washburn, as well as 2 intensive days of direct interaction with Whitacre himself, culminating in a performance on the stage of Vancouver's Orpheum Theatre with Eric Whitacre conducting. Those singers from the community not involved in the concert will be invited to attend an open rehearsal to observe Whitacre in rehearsal. Each will receive a printed copy of the score to one of his most famous scompositions and at the end of the rehearsal will be invited to sing along with Eric Whitacre. This is also a rare opportunity for the singers of the Vancouver Chamber Choir to work directly with a composer whose works they perform, an opportunity to hone their interpretive skills under his personal tutelage.
$15,000.00
2012

Vancouver Chinese Instrumental Music Society

Musical Transformations: Our Story (working title)

Performed at the Norman Rothstein Theatre, this concert will be a reflection and examination of immigration and diaspora of Chinese music in Vancouver. Facilitating an understanding of Vancouver’s diverse identities and representing a cultural group with such presence in Vancouver, this performance will feature Canada’s very first professional Chinese instrumental music group. The nights’ repertoire takes audiences through the evolution of Chinese music starting with traditional influences brought by the influx of Chinese immigration during the 1970s. The first section highlights classical folk styles, pieces that demand a mastery of technique. These tunes often have philosophical associations, which will be addressed by our MC Dr. Jan Walls. Following will be a selection of rearranged works that have extracted elements from both eastern and western practices. In the third section, the ensemble will perform Canadian commissioned pieces for Chinese Instruments. Progressing through the development of contemporary music will provide a look at where Chinese music is headed in Vancouver.
$6,000.00
2012

Vancouver Humane Society

Upgrades to Fundraising Database and Website Content Management Software

VHS is seeking funding in order to upgrade two software programs that are crucual to our program operations. The first program upgrade will update the Windows compatibility and feature enhancements of our fundraising database software. The second upgrade will update the content management software for our Chicken OUT! website to a simpler program that can be used by in-house staff instead of outsourcing to contractors.
$6,040.00
2012

Vancouver International Dance Festival Society

Gathering Project

The project that we are proposing is a gathering of contemporary Aboriginal and culturally diverse dance artists from across Canada with the purpose of sharing our artistic practices and our methods of disseminating our artistic practices with each other. We will do this by inviting over forty dance artists/companies to come to Vancouver to take part in the gathering. The gathering will take place over a six day period in the month of March, 2013 during the Vancouver International Dance Festival. During this week, we will use the Roundhouse Performance Centre and the Roundhouse Exhibition Hall as open spaces that will offer alternating sessions of performances and discussion. We expect that this gathering will result in the development of an active and mutually supportive network of Aboriginal and culturally diverse contemporary dance artists' network that increasingly helps one another to get their artistic creations seen by more people outside of their own communities.
$25,000.00
2012

Vancouver Maritime Museum

Lured

In Lured, visitors explore all aspects of the sea and its eternal draw. It steps into the life of those who are lured to the sea for their livelihood and touches on the economic and social impact on Vancouver - a port city. Lured will be presented as two unique, but complimentary exhibits, each with different components and elements yet linked through the individual works of three artists and their interpretation of common themes. The underlying themes include: globalization and economics - who works on the cargo ships in our harbour and who provides seafarer's social safety net. The artists, Allan Sekula , Stan Douglas and Uriel Orlow, are renowned both locally and internationally. Using the artists existing work, and tying into the museum's multidimensional objects and archival materials, the exhibit will look at the evolution of container shipping and its profound impact socially and economically on the city of Vancouver. We are pleased to have Vancouver based artist Stan Douglas participate in this unique project.
$10,000.00
2012

Vancouver Moving Theatre Society

Black Strathcona Interactive Project

Black Strathcona is an innovative, interactive new media project celebrating Vancouver's vibrant black community that flourished in the East End neighbourhood of Strathcona (1920's -1970's). The project will consist of ten to twelve short video stories, highlighting the rich and cultural heritage of the community. The video stories will be presented by professionals and combines storytelling with rarely seen archival photographs and brings to life aspects of the community's history in the location it occurred. The project provides two access opportunities: 1) by a standard website where users can take a virtual tour of the culture, history, and personalities from anywhere in the world, and, 2) by using a mobile device such as a smart phone, anyone can access the rapidly downloadable 'mobile' site. The mobile website displays a map of the Strathcona neighbourhood with markers depicting the locations of the video stories. Viewers scan the QR codes that downloads 'a' video story onto their device. eg. Springfield Stories, www.SpringfieldStories.com Username: guest Password: letmein2011
$37,000.00
2012

Vancouver Orphan Kitten Rescue VOKRA

Application & Website Enhancement Project

VOKRA has a custom application and integrated website. This application manages cat intake, foster home management, cat medical care, and adoptions. We have identified a number of enhancements to support our expanding rescue operation’s processes and procedures - such as foster self-service data entry, automated medical treatment reminders, and better search capabilities for adoption matches. Our website (www.vokra.ca) , which is integrated with the application, needs an overhaul to provide a “fresh face” for VOKRA. This is part of an ongoing strategy to update our brand identity. We would also like to address some useability issues of our current website structure. We are hoping that these improvements will make our site more attractive, drive up the number of cats adopted, increase donations and help us fulfill our mandate of helping the homeless cats and kittens of the Lower Mainland.
$8,800.00
2012

Vancouver Poetry House Society

The Spoken Word Marquee Series

When Shane Koyczan performed at the 2010 Winter Olympic opening ceremonies, it heralded a new era for spoken word poetry. Koyczan honed his poetic craft as a six-time member of the Vancouver Poetry Slam team. His meteoric rise began with the opportunities he found through Vancouver Poetry House. The current need is to raise the profile of talented local spoken word artists and to highlight voices from underrepresented communities. The Spoken Word Marquee Series at VIPF would showcase established and emerging spoken word artists alongside each other. We plan to program 4-6 events as part of this Marquee Series including: a musical-literary collaboration with Shane Koyczan, Dan Mangan, and The Fugitives; a Dub Poetry partnership between the Black Dot Roots & Culture Collective (BeDRoCC) and two-time Juno award-winning poet Lillian Allen; Hip Hop Poetry featuring Beat Nation, Zaccheus Jackson, and CR Avery; and Queer Stories featuring Ivan Coyote and Tara Hardy. These shows celebrate today's premier spoken word poets and bring forward the next generation.
$15,000.00
2012

Vancouver Summer Festival Society

Ancient Cultures / New Sounds - a major concert in MusicFest Vancouver 2013

Ancient Cultures / New Sounds is a major project planned for MusicFest Vancouver 2013 (August 9 - 18). Under the curatorial direction of Persian-trained instrumentalist and vocalist Amir Koushkani, this contemporary music collaboration will see Canadian world music ensemble Safa welcome several performers including Azerbaijani singer Alim Qasimov to create and perform new compositions and improvisations performed on instruments from the Arabian, Iranian, and Turkish traditions. The focal point will be a MusicFest Vancouver BMO Main Stage public concert in the stunning acoustics of the Chan Centre at UBC. It will also include a free educational lecture/demonstration within MusicFest Vancouver's Inside the Music series. As part of MusicFest Vancouver and supported by the Chan Centre, this project will receive extensive media coverage both with the complete festival and in targeted outreach marketing to specific cultural and artistic communities.The venue is beside the Museum of Anthropology, which will be exhibiting contemporary art works from the same region.
$15,000.00
2012

Vancouver Symphony Orchestra

U.S. West Coast Tour

The Vancouver Symphony Orchestra has been invited to undertake a tour of the U.S. West Coast in January/February 2013. The invitation was extended by Columbia Artists Management (CAMI), one of the world's most experienced and prestigious classical music artist management firms. Interest from presenters has been high, and the tour will consist of 8 concerts taking place in Seattle, Las Vegas, Santa Barbara, Northridge and Alisa Viejo (suburbs of Los Angeles), Palm Desert, Scottsdale and Tucson. Our Music Director, Bramwell Tovey, will conduct all concerts and the piano soloist will be world-renowned Vancouverite Jon Kimura Parker. The program will include a new work the VSO has commissioned from Edward Top, our Composer-In-Residence, entitled 'Totem' (a reflection on First Nations themes), the Grieg Piano Concerto and Prokofiev Symphony No. 5. The VSO has a long history of touring and most recently toured Central Canada in 2009 with concerts in Ottawa, Toronto, Montreal and Quebec City and Asia - Korea, Macau and China in 2008. It last toured the U.S. West Coast in 1978
$75,000.00
2012

Pages