Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

Aunt Leah's Independent Lifeskills Society

The Link

Aunt Leah's provides semi-independent housing for sixteen foster teens, 15-18 years of age, who are preparing to live on their own when they 'age out' of care at 19. We provide a basement suite with a supportive landlord as well as pre-employment and life skills training. Despite this intervention, many of these children are not fully prepared to make a full and successful transition to adulthood. Many go through a series of tenancy breakdowns and couch surfing ending with a large percent on income assistance or experiencing homeless. In 2010, Vancouver Foundation began 3 years of funding for a second-stage program called The Link which provides transition workers, food & housing, and education opportunities for 30 youth (annually). Today, the demand for this program has risen with over 80 former foster kids served per annum. The Link mimics the care that parented youth receive well into early adulthood; over half of 20-something Canadians choose to live at home. Over 40% of BC foster youth experience homeless after age 19; yet 90% of Link youth maintain safe affordable housing.
$100,000.00
2013

The Link

Aunt Leah's provides semi-independent housing for sixteen foster teens, 15-18 years of age, who are preparing to live on their own when they 'age out' of care at 19. We provide a basement suite with a supportive landlord as well as pre-employment and life skills training. Despite this intervention, many of these children are not fully prepared to make a full and successful transition to adulthood. Many go through a series of tenancy breakdowns and couch surfing ending with a large percent on income assistance or experiencing homeless. In 2010, Vancouver Foundation began 3 years of funding for a second-stage program called The Link which provides transition workers, food & housing, and education opportunities for 30 youth (annually). Today, the demand for this program has risen with over 80 former foster kids served per annum. The Link mimics the care that parented youth receive well into early adulthood; over half of 20-something Canadians choose to live at home. Over 40% of BC foster youth experience homeless after age 19; yet 90% of Link youth maintain safe affordable housing.
$100,000.00
2013

Community Social Planning Council of Greater Victoria

Building Resilient Neighbourhoods

In 2012,we fostered neighbourhood resilience and action on social, economic and environmental sustainability in the CRD with Transition Victoria, supported by the Vancouver Foundation and Smart Planning for Communities. More than 200 residents from neighbourhood, business, and local government organizations participated in a series of training sessions to develop skills, resources and strategies to strengthen community resilience. Our recent webinar for local gvnts was oversubscribed within hours, demonstrating strong appetite for this project. Evaluation by participants was overwhelmingly positive and has resulted in the design of a 2nd phase of the initiative. The Resilient Neighbourhoods project works with neighbours and citizens to strengthen characteristics of resilience in ways that support neighbourhood connection today and strengthen capacity to respond to challenges in the future. It supports action by working with community groups, businesses, citizens, community organizations and institutions to develop community action on local resilience, community cohesion and wellbeing
$108,425.00
2013

Hollyburn Family Services Society

Life Success Program

The Life Success Program (LSP) is a transitional housing program that supports homeless transitional aged youth, ages 18-24, to acquire the skills needed to live independently. Key areas of focus include life skills, employment, education, interpersonal relationships and community integration. The Life Success Program gives homeless youth a chance to get on their feet, build skills, and form a web of community resources around them while being encouraged and supported in creating a healthy and balanced lifestyle. Referrals come directly from the young persons themselves, other community resource providers, teachers, social workers, and families. The Life Success Program has access to a variety of groups from the Transition to Adulthood program in support of identified clients goals. The variety of programs provided include the Budget Chef cooking program, Girls Group, the Outdoor Education Program, the Hollyburn / Chill Snowboarding program, a community garden and Hollyburn Hockey Heroes.
$100,000.00
2013

School District #43 - Coquitlam

Red Wolf Spirit Adventures

The Coquitlam School District Aboriginal Education (CSDAE) in partnership with Outward Bound Canada will facilitate together an outdoor education program that will balance adventure based learning with cultural teachings. Red Wolf Spirit Adventures will be facilitated in two separate programs; the Suwa'lkh Learning Centre (SLC) and the Aboriginal Youth Leadership Council (AYLC) The Suwa'lkh Learning Centre is hosted by SD#43 Aboriginal Education. The program is inclusive; however, Aboriginal students comprise approximately 98% of the 35 students attending this school. This program provides a more personalized learning environment for students. Youth at this school have typically had more personal challenges to overcome in their lives. The AYLC is comprised of Aboriginal students in grades 9 and 12 that are viewed as having positive leadership qualities. For the current school year we have 48 enrolled students in this programThe objective of this group is to continue developing their leadership skills through planning and hosting community events as a way of giving back.
$100,000.00
2013

Simon Fraser University

Place-Making with Seniors: Towards Meaningful Affordable Housing (Co-lead Researchers: Dr. Andrew Sixsmith, Director, Gerontology Research Centre, SFU, and Mr. Jack Mulleny, Volunteer, Kiwanis Seniors Society)

Housing that is not only affordable but also supportive of the psycho-social needs of seniors is fundamental to the health and well-being of our aging population. Community consultation has identified the need for housing interventions that build 'sense of place', ascribed through access to supports to keep mentally and physically active, opportunities to build social capital and facilitating an enhanced role for seniors in the design process. To address these needs our research will: (i) understand how sense of place is experienced by older adults transitioning into affordable housing (ii) translate resident experiences into formal and informal supports that foster meaningful aspects of place, and (iii) create a role for older people as active 'placemakers' in community planning and development. This project builds upon a strong partnership of local government, planners and developers, seniors's; services and Kiwanis seniors who are involved in the design of the affordable housing development & 'Kiwanis Towers'. The project represents a timely opportunity to build skills and capacity and embed residents' preferences in the design process. To ensure the meaningful engagement of older adults we will use a community-based participatory research approach, training residents as co-researchers and using participant-led research methods. The project will develop a Sense of Place Development Guide that has broader applicability in the design of housing supports for seniors. Research Team members: Ms. Dena Kae Beno, Project Team Member, Dr. Judith Sixmith, Academic Advisory, Dr. Ryan Woolrich, Researcher, and Mr. Brian Dagneault, Project Team Member.
$106,200.00
2013