Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

Canadian Centre For Policy Alternatives

Water, the Environment and Economy and BC's Liquefied Natural Gas Plans

The provincial government says that big increases in natural gas production will boost employment and GDP, and can eliminate the provincial debt and channel billions of dollars more into healthcare programs. But how realistic are the government's economic projections? What would such an upswing mean for critical resources such as water? What does this strategy mean for BC’s GHG emission targets? And what might the alternatives to a strategy based on massive increases in gas-drilling and gas exports be? This project would bring much-needed focus to these questions by: conducting a full “cradle-to-grave” analysis of an expanded natural gas industry's impacts on freshwater resources; analysing and critiquing the economic assumptions underlying current export plans; proposing an alternative, made-in-BC gas plan that strategically uses our natural gas endowment to transition to a clean energy future; and providing a template for meaningful pre-development planning of gas projects so that the needs of First Nations and rural communities directly affected by gas developments are met.
$90,000.00
2013

Central Okanagan Naturalists Club

Fascieux Creek Restoration and Habitat Conservation

In 2010, Ecole KLO Middle School students discovered Western Painted turtle eggs in their long jump sandpit. In the 1980’s, the part of Fascieux Creek, which bisects school property, was diverted into a culvert and covered with concrete pads interrupting the flow of the stream and destroying the turtle and fish habitat. When the eggs were discovered, the sandpit was fenced to protect the turtles, however, recognizing that only the restoration of the creek would ensure the future of the turtles, the students decided to naturalize the creek and restore the terrestrial and aquatic habitats. In 2010-11, the students and Green Parent Committee engaged Golder Associates, an environmental consulting firm, to complete a conceptual design on an in-kind basis. In 2012, CONC agreed to provide volunteer labor, funding help and expertise on creek and habitat restoration. Golder will do the Natural Environment Development Permit Application process and Environmental Impact Assessment, the procurement of all permits and determining the resources necessary to complete the earthworks.
$8,000.00
2013

Centre for Indigenous Environmental Resources

Our Water - Our Future

The project, “Our Water – Our Future”: First Nation Youth Water Leaders Creating Change is a 2 year program to empower and enable Indigenous youth to assume positions of leadership on water issues by providing them with the tools to protect water, supporting them with access to network of existing dynamic, prominent water leaders, and inspiring them with water learning experiences. 16 you the from a First Nations in each of the 4 main watersheds of Canada (Pacific, Arctic, Atlantic and Hudson Bay) have been chosen. Each community will host a week-long water leadership training workshop. During and between the workshops, youth will design and implement (with CIER help) and share personal action plans to address local water challenges. We are seeking a Vancouver Foundation Community Grant to support our Pacific watershed workshop (workshop #2). The workshop will be located on the Similkameen River in Keremeos, BC and will involve understanding and exploring water issues that affect the Similkameen, Okanagan, and Columbia rivers and, ultimately the health of the Pacific watershed.
$20,000.00
2013

Cowichan Community Land Trust Society

The Great Big Bee Garden Challenge

This project begins to restore areas of networked native bee habitat by planting significant areas of a broad range of nectar and pollen producing native plant species, heritage herbaceous perennials and cover crop forages in a number of connected areas. Many of these are species are traditional first peoples food plants that have been pollinated by our 200 species of native bee pollinators for 10,000's of years and thus a key to sustained food security for coastal first peoples. These plants provide realistic quantities of nectar and pollen for native pollinators and restores a very necessary biodiversity in order to meet the nutritional requirements of pollinators for sustained enhanced immune response to current and future environmental stressors. We are organized to accomplish this through timely community education, participation and engagement of all age groups in diverse venues in both urban and rural landscapes in the Cowichan Valley following the guidelines and coaching from organizations such as the very successful Xerces Society of Invertebrate Conservation.
$25,344.00
2013

Environmental Defence Canada

Freshwater and habitat protection through the Blue Flag program

In 2014, we are looking forward to celebrating BC's first ever Blue Flag beach in the community of Harrison Hot Springs. Having qualified as a Blue Flag candidate in August 2011, Harrison Hot Spring's town council voted to certify for the stringent 32 criteria under the international Blue Flag program. We would like to help them attain this prized eco-label, internationally awarded to the world's cleanest, safest beaches and marinas. We are also excited to celebrate BC's first ever Blue Flag beach, and inspire others to protect their aquatic ecosystems. As Harrison Hot Springs' candidacy has attracted local attention, we have since been approached by other BC municipalities about our program. Over the next 3 years, we will invite 15 municipalities to join our Blue Flag program, and walk them through the process by which they can protect their important freshwater resources, while celebrating their communities' environmental commitments. Some of these other freshwater bodies are Shuswap, Okanagan and Cultus Lakes, in addition to many other popular freshwater BC beaches.
$25,000.00
2013

Environmental Youth Alliance

The Nectar Trail

Work by local ecologists has shown that corridors connecting habitat islands can lead to large population increases for local pollinators. To this end, we will work with the community to implement a demonstration habitat corridor that links existing pollinator-friendly parks. By supporting local residents to maintain 1000s of pollinator plants and structures along these routes, we will create habitat-rich sites in which bees, butterflies, and birds can thrive. Partnering with the City of Vancouver, Vancouver Park Board, residents, schools, and businesses, the Nectar Trail will link conservation, land use, health, and food, providing a forum for the people of Vancouver to examine urban ecological interdependencies. The project will be created along the newly established Ridgeway Greenway in the section between Vandusen Garden and Queen Elizabeth Park. Connecting the parks with several large pollinator gardens accompanied with onsite interpretive media and environmental art, our demonstration 'Nectar Trail' creates a new model of urban restoration and a unique amenity for Vancouver.
$20,000.00
2013

Fraser Valley Watersheds Coalition

Restoring and Sustaining our Freshwater Resources

Restoring and Sustaining our Freshwater Resources: Creating a Culture for natural healthy communities. FVWC will work with landowners, governments, First Nations, other organizations and communities across the Fraser Valley. The focus is to create a culture around protecting and sustaining our freshwater resources. In order to do so, a number of projects benefiting the different facets of the region and diversity of people, coupled with existing and publicly accepted events, is required. In general, we plan to: -Help identify local and regional level threats to waterways and create a shared information database with a regional/watershed approach. -Monitor water quality/fish presence along key watercourses across the Fraser Valley that contain known salmon spawning, rearing and other rare species. Data will be used to help isolate areas of waterway threats and opportunities. -Host a Manure and Water workshop. -Conduct riparian habitat enhancements throughout the Fraser Valley. -Engage and share knowledge about protecting freshwater resources -Conduct habitat restoration
$30,000.00
2013

Friends Of The Summerland Research Station Gardens

Innovative Landscaping for Water Conservation

Building on the momentum and success of our pilot project, the Friends are requesting assistance with this new phase of our water conservation program as it relates to our community outreach, water conservation survey, demonstration sites and educational programs. The single action that will have the most significant impact on increasing water conservation in the Okanagan Basin is reducing discretionary water use for landscaping. The current Friends’ board and staff are committed to making water conservation a top priority. Our demonstration sites will incorporate innovative solutions to measure and reduce water use and enchance habitat and increase biodiversity. Our outreach will involve residents, community leaders, volunteers and students in applied science activities designed to inform their environmental stewardship. The project will act as an agent of change for sustainable water conservation landscaping and is intended to increase adoption of ecologically based landscaping practices in the region through demonstration, education and strengthening community partnerships.
$10,000.00
2013

Galiano Conservancy Association

Living Landscapes: Restoring Place, Connecting People Project

The project will implement ecological restoration treatments and conduct restoration planning on Galiano Island with a strong educational and community engagement focus. The project will take place on DL 57, a parcel that was recently acquired by the Galiano Conservancy and is recognized regionally for its high conservation value. The 76 Ha. property supports a diversity of healthy, intact ecosystems and has a history of agriculture, small scale forestry and residential use. The vision for the property includes the creation of the Galiano Learning Centre to provide a venue for multi-day experiential education programs along with long-term research and innovation focused on restoration and sustainable living. The Conservancy has assembled a team of experienced partners and professionals, students and community volunteers to initiate the restoration of a portable mill site, helping to create a thriving forest ecosystem out of hard-packed earth. Our team will also develop a property level restoration plan that is crafted to provide long-term educational and research opportunities.
$20,000.00
2013

GOERT

Engaging Communities in Bluebird Stewardship

This project will build a framework for community involvement through participation, training, and outreach in the Western Bluebird Reintroduction Program. We are re-establishing this locally extinct population through a series of translocations over 5 years, and by installing nestboxes to replace this critical missing habitat element. The population’s long-term viability will largely depend on fostering community support and volunteer action, because most remaining Garry oak habitats are on private property. A highlight of this project is recruiting bluebird volunteers and providing them with formal training at ‘Bluebird Field School’, allowing them to participate in crucial activities: building & monitoring nestboxes; monitoring & reporting nestbox activity; surveying for birds; and improving habitat quality to support biodiversity conservation. This project will develop a comprehensive community outreach program for the final 2 years of translocations, to ensure continued habitat suitability and to serve as a model for other communities re-building populations of rare species.
$15,000.00
2013

Rivershed Society of BC

Sustainable Living Leadership Program

The Sustainable Living Leadership Program (SLLP), our flagship program, trains, engages & inspires BC’s environmental leaders of tomorrow through a month long experiential learning program on the Fraser River. The SLLP equips them with skills to become effective leaders who identify & address challenging conservation & sustainability issues. The river becomes a floating classroom as they camp along its banks & experience firsthand its flora, fauna & ecosystems, and learn about watersheds (water cycle, watershed planning & management), the Fraser River (history, issues & challenges), salmon (lifecycle, issues, fisheries management) & resource use (forests, oil, value-added) while getting hands-on experience in ecology and biology. They identify changes in the landscape, discuss the impact and merits of power generation, engineering controls, energy conservation and sustainable choices. They develop leadership skills in team building, conflict resolution, communication & critical thinking, and each complete a community sustainability action plan, which they implement in their home town
$20,000.00
2013

Salt Spring Island Conservancy

Restoration of Freshwater Habitats in the Cusheon Lake Watershed on Salt Spring

After a year of fundraising and enormous community support, SSIC acquired the Blackburn Lake Nature Reserve, 32 acres in the Cusheon Lake watershed with outstanding biodiversity values and opportunities to preserve water quality through restoration of its streams and wetlands. Blackburn Lake delivers most of Cusheon Lake's water, which provides drinking water to hundreds of households and has recurring toxic algal blooms that threaten water quality. Restoration of Blackburn Lake will positively impact the health of this watershed. This project addresses the Cusheon Watershed Management Plan goal of decreasing phosphorous inputs by: a) Creating a restoration demonstration site on Blackburn Lake Nature Reserve, including: Increasing wetlands buffers to allow sediments to settle; fencing to allow establishment of areas with high deer browse; invasive species control. b) Delivering a workshop: Invite public to attend workshop by a specialist to learn restoration techniques. c) Completing riparian mapping in watershed: to prioritize future work.
$15,000.00
2013

Simon Fraser University - Morris J. Wosk Centre For Dialogue

Moving in a Livable Region: Investing in Transportation for a Growing Economy

The SFU Centre for Dialogue through Carbon Talks will work with key stakeholders to undertake an extensive third-party public consultation on funding options, decision-making models, and planning tools for regional transportation. The ultimate goal of this project is to develop a sustainable funding regime for transportation for Metro Vancouver, and by extension a model for other urban jurisdictions. Carbon Talks will gather and analyze data on funding options, decision-making models, and planning tools through opinion research and extensive citizen consultation. Those options that are most favoured by residents will be compiled into a policy framework, then advanced through knowledge mobilization and government relations. A communications strategy will raise the public’s awareness about the funding options, the vision, and the decision-making structures that govern transportation.
$15,000.00
2013

The Land Trust Alliance of British Columbia

BC Conservation Toolkit

The Conservation Toolkit will be targeted toward four distinct user groups: land trusts, landowners, local governments and professional advisors (realtors, accountants, lawyers). The Conservation Toolkit will be an online/print repository of documents, hosted by the LTABC, related to work of land trusts (specifically in BC, but with broader applications as well). Each section of the Toolkit will provide templates and sample documents related to the legal, financial and policy tools available for conservation in BC. The Toolkit (in particular the Landowner Toolkit) will include online videos on topics such as conservation covenants. Where possible, sample documents will be solicited from LTABC member land trusts and other partners. However, it is anticipated that additional work will be required to create or refine templates and information for different sections of the Toolkit. Where relevant, connections will be made between existing and related tools, such as the Canadian Land Trust Standards and Practices and Greening Your Title.
$30,000.00
2013

The Polis Foundation

BC Water Funders Workshop

$2,675.00
2013

Tides Canada Initiatives Society

Clean Energy Transition Project, Clean Energy Canada at Tides Canada

Our organization is working to encourage provincial leadership on climate disruption, while lowering overall energy use and diversifying the provincial economy. We are building consensus on how British Columbia might best reduce its dependence on carbon-based commodities such as oil, gas, and coal, and instead create an ecologically responsible low-carbon society that creates prosperity through clean-energy innovation. We created the project after identifying a significant gap in the climate and energy advocacy landscape; there was no NGO focused on accelerating Canada’s transition to a low-carbon society. Our scope is national, but energy is provincially regulated and we are in Vancouver, so we devote special attention to British Columbia—which has a strong base of policy leadership to build upon. We primarily work with thought leaders and policy makers to build support for policy action among a powerful and diverse array of business, government, and civil society actors, but we are also engaging with citizens to support leadership on climate change, clean energy, and efficiency.
$35,000.00
2013

BC Transboundary Headwaters Conservation Initiative

Northwest BC and the adjoining strip of Alaska embrace a premier North American ecological hotspot. Here 6 spectacular watersheds, all with BC headwaters, link remote upland, boreal, temperate rainforest and marine ecosystems. Still mostly intact, they are exceptional salmon strongholds and biodiversity reservoirs as well as home to First Nations. Mining development on a scale not unlike the Alberta tar sands will impact the transboundary watersheds. A new transmission line bringing industrial power north is the driver. Rivers Without Borders (RWB) promotes visionary, balanced, ecosystem planning for this region which includes First Nations, communities and stakeholders, and is international in scope. In contrast, BC government appears to be pursuing a pro-development agenda without appropriate regulatory oversight. Our proposal lays groundwork to create a regional International Watershed Board under the auspices of the Boundary Waters Treaty. This will provide balance to a mining boom, creating a framework and expectation to focus on water quality and habitat protection.
$25,000.00
2013

West Coast Environmental Law Research Foundation

Environmental Strategy Retreat

We are collaborating with other organizations and First Nations involved in the Tar Sands Campaign (TSC) to implement a training, networking and information sharing retreat to bring together individuals working on tar sands issues. The TSC is a complex campaign that includes native and non-native activists from across BC, related campaigns in Europe, the US, and Canada, on diverse topics of pipelines, markets, and tar sands production. Ensuring our wide range of campaigners have the capacity to collaborate effectively been a challenge. In 2012 we overcame this through a retreat for over 80 activists that focused on skill building, learning, and network strengthening. It was an incredible success and led to significant cross border organizing, cross sector collaboration and better practices in communications. In 2013, we would like to hold the Retreat again with a focus on new priorities as identified from 2012 evaluations, such as more in depth strategic planning and training on how to connect and engage BC residents and communities. We will offer a minimum of 30 scholarships.
$7,500.00
2013

Managing Cumulative Impacts on BC's Ecosystems and Communities: Legal Solutions

Many rural regions are simultaneously dealing with proposals for mining, forestry, hydroelectric, oil and gas development, and related roads, power-lines and other infrastructure, while urban areas face increasing populations and demands for land use, yet BC currently lacks a legal framework to proactively and comprehensively manage the cumulative impacts of these issues to protect the environment and human well-being. In this project we will focus on two ‘hot button’ issues where political, economic and public attention is bringing the question of cumulative impacts management to a head, in order to create momentum behind needed reforms: 1) liquified natural gas development, particularly as it impacts multiple values in the Northwest; 2) sea level rise in the Lower Mainland. We will rely on West Coast’s multi-year research of best practices in cumulative impacts management from around the world, including our analysis of more than 25 regional governance models as a foundation, and work with a range of allies to support the development of collaborative solutions in these 2 regions.
$28,000.00
2013

Western Canada Wilderness Committee

The Time is Now - Legislation for BC’s Endangered Species

The goal of this project is to engage in extensive outreach and mobilization to further increase awareness about species at risk in British Columbia, and to advocate for strong endangered species legislation. Using and building on our outstanding educational resources from the past year – including video footage of species at risk, stunning photos, striking child and youth-produced artwork, compelling presentations, and our educational report – the Wilderness Committee proposes to extend our outreach and mobilization to a broader audience. Specifically, we will focus on three areas: children, youth, and young adults (through their educational institutions); a broader geographic focus; and increased outreach to the general public. With the upcoming BC election, this is a politically strategic time to put endangered species on the agenda. If the election results in a government committed to endangered species legislation, which is likely, this 18-month period will be instrumental in achieving strong, effective stand-alone legislation to protect endangered species.
$35,000.00
2013

Wildsight Living Lakes Canada

Living Lakes Canada - I Love My Lake

With an intensification of shoreline development proposals in the Columbia Basin, government agencies and community organizations have been working on Kootenay region lakes since 2006. With management guidelines now in place, Living Lakes Canada, in partnership with the East Kootenay Integrated Lake Management Partnership and Kootenay Lake Partnership, have developed an outreach strategy to engage these lake communities in a broader water stewardship dialogue, and move toward implementing the science into decision-making processes (Official Community Plans, Lake Management Plans or zoning bylaws). I Love My Lake aims to engage and create a sense of pride around healthy shorelines for shoreline property owners and other lake users. “I Love My Lake” includes a series of outreach tools and workshops designed to educate lake stewardship groups, local governments, realtors, and other community leaders about best practices in shoreline management, the aquatic habitat value of their lake, and encourage public participation in planning initiatives to better protect ecological values.
$19,000.00
2013

Yellowstone to Yukon Conservation Initiative

Local Communications Campaign to Protect the Peace River Valley & Stop SiteC Dam

The PVEA seeks to implement a local communications plan as part of its campaign to protect the Peace River Valley and stop the Site C dam. PVEA intends to undertake a number of actions including: creating and delivering messaging relevant to local audiences through social media, posters, pamphlets and through presentations in collaboration with local group leaders; distributing media releases and columns to local news media on a regular basis about the dam, the various issues and opportunities to influence decision-making; creating a customer relationship management database and mailer; carrying out voice-interactive response calls to every household in Peace River north and south; carrying out a telephone town hall amongst all homes in the Peace Region; undertaking a direct mailer to 5,000 homes in the Peace Region; and conducting polling two-thirds of the way through the campaign period to measure success and determine the best strategy for the final few months of campaigning.
$28,000.00
2013

Peace-Making: Advancing Conservation Outcomes in BC's Peace River Break

Since 2008 Y2Y has led an effort to raise awareness about, and support conservation of the Peace River Break (PRB). This culminated in a successful conference in March 2012, at which more than 50 individuals validated work to date and contributed to future plans. Y2Y will build upon this work to advance a shared conservation vision for the PRB. We will finalize a conservation agenda that will preserve sufficient intact lands to maintain connectivity for wildlife and ecosystem services for human communities. Through a new and significant partnership with the University of Northern BC, we will establish a repository of accessible regional spatial information, and initiate an assessment of wildlife mortality hotspots, especially along Highway 97 through Pine Pass. We will push the BC government to complete the proposed Peace-Boudreau Park. We will involve local First Nations in these efforts. We will communicate about the importance of the region and strengthen the connections among its communities. We will build the long-term capacity of local organizations to carry on this work.
$50,000.00
2013