Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

Abbotsford Community Services

Bridges to Adulthood

When youth in care turn 19, they lose the support they have been receiving from the Ministry and from other youth service providers. Due to the intensity of our caseloads, our ability to offer follow up services after youth age out of government care is limited. During two pilot projects, we were able to continue services beyond youths' 19th birthdays; some of the outcomes of these pilot projects include youth getting and staying out of drug and sex trades, reduced street-entrenchment and increased natural support for youth. Such outcomes inspired us to create the Bridges to Adulthood project. In this project, we will offer support to young adults (ages 18.5 to 20) through our adulthood preparation groups, young adults support groups and individualized outreach services. Our aim is to increase natural supports for these young adults by involving former foster parents, recruiting mentors, building a peer support network and possibly involve families. We also intend to increase youth and community engagement through focus groups and in advocating for relevant policy changes.
$165,000.00
2013

Adoptive Families Association of British Columbia

Speak-Out Youth Group

In 2009 AFABC partnered with MCFD to plan and implement a project aimed at increasing the number of permanency plans for youth in government care. The Speak-Out Youth Group evolved from this pilot in recognition of the value that both individual and collective perspectives and experiences played in the successful delivery of the initiative. 15 youth participants expressed an adamant interest in remaining connected to AFABC and the project in order to continue exploring options for permanence and develop more resource materials about teen adoption. The Speak-Out Youth Group is an empowering youth led program with 25 active members and consists of youth-in-care, former youth-in-care, and adoptees aged 13-24 from BC’s Vancouver Coastal and Fraser Regions. By focusing on youth engagement, this program gives a powerful voice to those who have experiences with the foster care system. Monthly meetings also give youth an opportunity to develop transferable life skills by working with career professionals, child and youth care representatives, and clinical counselors.
$20,000.00
2013

Arts in Action Society

Youth Care Media Project (WORKING TITLE ONLY)

This digital storytelling project will work with a group of youth and youth technical mentors to create a series of digital stories. The themes of this project will centre around the participant's response to the lack of support for youth in government care as they reach adulthood. This project will mentor the youth in community engaged digital video production skills with the intention of inviting the participants to create stories that relate to the project's inquiry. This work is intended to challenge and question the current mainstream narrative on homelessness and youth. This project seeks to create venues and opportunities for youth from diverse backgrounds to question, respond, and provoke a greater public awareness of the issues facing youth and housing issues. Community video is created through collaboration with skilled artists and and sees production values as an inherent part of the process. The project will create these digital stories in a series of workshops. We are committed to a collaborative, respectful, and democratic working environment
$20,000.00
2013

Aunt Leah's Independent Lifeskills Society

The Link

Aunt Leah's provides semi-independent housing for sixteen foster teens, 15-18 years of age, who are preparing to live on their own when they 'age out' of care at 19. We provide a basement suite with a supportive landlord as well as pre-employment and life skills training. Despite this intervention, many of these children are not fully prepared to make a full and successful transition to adulthood. Many go through a series of tenancy breakdowns and couch surfing ending with a large percent on income assistance or experiencing homeless. In 2010, Vancouver Foundation began 3 years of funding for a second-stage program called The Link which provides transition workers, food & housing, and education opportunities for 30 youth (annually). Today, the demand for this program has risen with over 80 former foster kids served per annum. The Link mimics the care that parented youth receive well into early adulthood; over half of 20-something Canadians choose to live at home. Over 40% of BC foster youth experience homeless after age 19; yet 90% of Link youth maintain safe affordable housing.
$100,000.00
2013

The Link

Aunt Leah's provides semi-independent housing for sixteen foster teens, 15-18 years of age, who are preparing to live on their own when they 'age out' of care at 19. We provide a basement suite with a supportive landlord as well as pre-employment and life skills training. Despite this intervention, many of these children are not fully prepared to make a full and successful transition to adulthood. Many go through a series of tenancy breakdowns and couch surfing ending with a large percent on income assistance or experiencing homeless. In 2010, Vancouver Foundation began 3 years of funding for a second-stage program called The Link which provides transition workers, food & housing, and education opportunities for 30 youth (annually). Today, the demand for this program has risen with over 80 former foster kids served per annum. The Link mimics the care that parented youth receive well into early adulthood; over half of 20-something Canadians choose to live at home. Over 40% of BC foster youth experience homeless after age 19; yet 90% of Link youth maintain safe affordable housing.
$100,000.00
2013

Greater Vancouver Regional District

2014 Metro Vancouver Homeless Count Youth Strategy

In March 2014, the RSCH will conduct a homeless count over a 24-hour period to provide a 'snapshot' of people who are homeless in the Metro Vancouver region. This includes estimating the number of youth who are homeless and obtaining a demographic profile of this population. After the 2008 homeless count, youth agencies expressed concern that youth had been under-represented. They requested the RSCH to develop a strategy specifically to reach homeless youth. Homeless youth are easily missed using approaches for homeless adults. A youth strategy was implemented in 2011. Agencies reported that it resulted in a more accurate estimate of youth homelessness and more youth answered all the survey questions compared to past years. The youth strategy will include: - Youth coordinator - Youth Steering Committee - Youth agencies to encourage homeless youth to ‘count themselves in’ at youth hubs and conduct surveys with homeless youth on the street - with youth volunteers - Youth volunteers for hub events and surveys - Youth involved in analysis, reporting, and evaluation
$40,000.00
2013

Hollyburn Family Services Society

Life Success Program

The Life Success Program (LSP) is a transitional housing program that supports homeless transitional aged youth, ages 18-24, to acquire the skills needed to live independently. Key areas of focus include life skills, employment, education, interpersonal relationships and community integration. The Life Success Program gives homeless youth a chance to get on their feet, build skills, and form a web of community resources around them while being encouraged and supported in creating a healthy and balanced lifestyle. Referrals come directly from the young persons themselves, other community resource providers, teachers, social workers, and families. The Life Success Program has access to a variety of groups from the Transition to Adulthood program in support of identified clients goals. The variety of programs provided include the Budget Chef cooking program, Girls Group, the Outdoor Education Program, the Hollyburn / Chill Snowboarding program, a community garden and Hollyburn Hockey Heroes.
$100,000.00
2013

Lu'ma Native Housing Society

Aboriginal Youth Mentorship & Housing program

Our Society plans to provide an Aboriginal Youth Mentorship & Housing program to support 30-50 youth annually, aged 16-24 who are transitioning from foster care to adulthood. This figure includes 15-20 youth who we currently house plus youth living elsewhere for whom we will provide outreach for. The program will provide an Aboriginal mentor, Mentor Assistant, & Housing Navigator to engage our youth in activities that will better guide their development of becoming a productive citizen with a strong cultural identity who is a good tenant and neighbour. We will adopt the Jim Casey Initiative to help our youth set up an Aboriginal Youth Board so they can become effective self-advocates. We will bring Lu'ma's existing community partners to create a Community Partnership Board. The two Boards will develop resources, opportunities & advocate for changes in services & public policy. Implementing the Jim Casey Initiative, we will offer our youth an 'Opportunity Passport' to open doors to financial planning, asset building & employment.
$85,000.00
2013

PLEA Community Services Society of BC

Pathways

At PLEA often we are only funded to support youth through the initial phases of their transition to adulthood and leaving care. Many of these youth have few or no positive support systems in place that they can rely on. We have had many youth try to reconnect with their previous worker to get the support they no longer have, even to get the basic necessities of life. To address the challenges youth face in this transition we propose a three year project that focuses on addressing structural barriers, providing youth with assistance to develop independent living skills in a safe environment and providing and ensuring consistent long-term reliable support. Our project model includes a part time 1-1 worker with a caseload of approximately 10-12 youth (17-19 years old) per year in the Lower Mainland. We will focus on three populations for this project: 1.Youth leaving residential services 2.Youth who have been sexually exploited 3.Youth involved in the justice system. Intakes will be prioritized from the three populations based on need(please see the next page for more details).
$168,000.00
2013

SOS Children's Village British Columbia (Canada) Society

Transition to Adulthood

Support for youth in developing independence has been minimal in our region, SOS BC became aware of the gaps in service through our own experience with youth living in our Village, we initiated the Transition to Adulthood program targeting youth 16 - 24 years of age in 2012. Our proposal is expansion of our program increasing our case management capability from 14 to 30. This would allow us to work with young adults before, during, and after their tenancy in our five new transitional housing suites insuring a consistency of involvement with these young people that they may not have experienced within the youth services programs prior. The program is voluntary with low barrier access and youth self refer. The youth guide the process and identify friends, family members and/or other professionals as partners in supporting them. Initially, a Casey Life Skills assessment is completed to provide a baseline assessment on each youth and establish goals. Youth workers provide direct support for the youth The curriculum includes: Civil rights, Tenancy, Personal safety, among other topics.
$142,000.00
2013