Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

Canadian National Institute for the Blind

Transition Peer Support Group for Young Adults in BC with Vision Loss

There is a lack of skills training and support for Canadians who are blind or partially sighted and the result is that 65 percent of working age adults with vision loss are unemployed and 50 percent earn less than $20,000 per year. CNIB's innovative Transition Peer Support Group for Young Adults in BC with Vision Loss will support young adults at this critical stage in their lives and prepare them with the skills and confidence they need to earn a living and maintain a job. Through interaction with others experiencing the same struggles and situations this pilot project will building acceptance of vision loss through the discovery of adaptive methods, accessibility options, independent living skills and practical skills such as interview techniques and resume writing. These groups will empower young adults with vision loss by arming them with essential tools and skills. Together, participants will explore and discuss topics related to education, transitioning into the working world, assistive technology to achieve independence, social interaction, family life and more.
$90,000.00
2014

Collingwood Neighbourhood House Society

Renfrew -Collingwood: Intercultural Circles of Connection and Engagement

To work with outreach connectors in the neighbourhood (which has been a successful approach in first engaging marginalized groups)to expand their capacity to work interculturally and bridge relations between peer-based groups, resulting in a more unified, interconnected, engaged neighbourhood. The project structure includes four intersecting circles that will ripple out to achieve collective connections, engagement and inter-relational impacts. Connectors Circle: Peer-based connectors will be linked to share and broaden intercultural practice and expand their relations outside their peer groups.Community Partners Circle: Interconnected neighbourhood partners will learn, adjust policy and practice to encourage intercultural connections. Communications Circle: Diverse citizens and neighbourhood workers will develop communication tools and share stories and strategies to support the intercultural connections. Knowledge Exchange Circle: conducts evaluations, shares theory and practices, delivers capacity building activities to help evolve diverse interactions and engagement.
$90,000.00
2014

First Nations Schools Association

Indian Residential Schools and Reconciliation Teacher Resource Guides

The Truth and Reconciliation Commission recommended “provincial and territorial departments of education work in concert with the Commission to develop age-appropriate educational materials about residential schools for use in public schools.” Too few Canadians are aware of this aspect of our collective history. According to the 2010 Urban Aboriginal Peoples survey, less than half of non-Aboriginal people have heard of residential schools. Knowledge about residential school history has relevance for all Canadians. We aim to support teachers who wish to teach about the history of residential schools and reconciliation by producing high quality, age appropriate, classroom ready and BC focused instructional and professional development materials. These materials seek to fill a gap as there is currently a lack of BC focused materials at all levels as well as a lack of age appropriate materials for teaching about residential schools at the elementary level.
$90,000.00
2014

Kindale Developmental Association

Employment Readiness for Youth and Young Adults

Kindale's project will assist youth and young adults with developmental disabilities to gain the skills, habits, attitudes, and experiences necessary to become employed in real jobs in their local community. The program is individualized based on the development of a personal employment plan for each of the 20 participants, focused on their abilities, needs, and goals. It includes employment skills assessment, training, coaching, on-the-job support, and reinforcement of the learned skills and habits at home. The project also works with local businesses to provide job-specific training and employment opportunities for the participants. Program staff work with employers and their employees to allay fears, raise awareness, and foster relationship building. On-the-job support is provided as needed by the program participant, employer, or their employees. This direct linking of personal employment planning, employment readiness training, job specific skills coaching, and employer development makes this project different from, and closes gaps in, services for this population.
$90,000.00
2014

Kinsight Community Society

Youth Employment Initiative

Years 2 & 3 of a 3 year project with a long range goal to expand community capacity to successfully engage youth who have developmental disabilities in sustainable, paid employment. It is intended to increase employment opportunities and the overall rate of employment for youth aged 15 - 19 in the TriCities. With the initiative successfully underway with 10 students at Heritage Woods Secondary in Port Moody, it is our intent to expand the project to the communities of Coquitlam and Port Coquitlam in years 2 & 3. This will be accomplished through supports to bridge Secondary students from school work experience placements into paid part or full time employment and by expanding the pool of employment opportunities in the TriCities through the recruitment & education of potential employers. A cross-sectoral steering committee will continue to evaluate and guide progress, ongoing viability and strategies for project expansion and improved connections to the business community. The 2nd and 3rd years allow us to check back with previous schools/communities to ensure project sustainability.
$95,791.16
2014

UBC - Office of Research Services

Generation Squeeze Public Engagement Strategy

The social and economic inequalities facing children, youth and families today are grounded in a generational inequity. As younger Canadians finish school, begin careers and start homes and families, they are squeezed by lower wages, higher costs, less time and a deteriorating environment, even though our economy produces more wealth than ever before. While governments use this economic wealth to adapt policy for others, including our aging population, they continue down a path that leaves less and less for younger generations. To address this inequity we need a collective voice with the political clout required to reduce the squeeze. That's why we plan to build an organization like CARP (formerly Canadian Association of Retired Persons) that is driven by and speaks up for younger Canada, and is self-sustaining. While we are generating interest across the country, this grant will specifically facilitate Engagement Organizing in BC, reflecting our commitment to including younger generations in creating A Canada That Works for All Generations.
$90,000.00
2014

Vancity Community Foundation

Keeping BC's Children and Youth on the Public Agenda

Working closely with our coalition partner organizations, First Call will work to strengthen and support the collective voice for the rights and well-being of BC's children & youth.Some of the key issues the project will address are BC's continued high rates of child & family poverty & growing inequality, the urgent need to increase investments in early childhood & support for young families, improvements to BC's child labour standards, better supports for vulnerable youth and reducing children's exposures to environmental toxins. The project will identify issues/challenges and propose solutions using 3 strategies: public education(including conducting research and disseminating/popularizing others' research), mobilizing communities & individuals through workshops/presentations, media work, social media/web resources, election toolkits, e-alerts, etc., and direct public policy advocacy (briefs, letters, reports, candidate surveys, convening/facilitating discussions among advocates and with decision-makers & policy-influencers, e.g. public officials, business & community reps.).
$90,000.00
2014

Vancouver Aboriginal Child and Family Services Society

Culturally Relevant Urban Wellness (CRUW) Program

There are critical gaps in services for connecting Vancouver's most vulnerable youth to green space for wellness in holistic and dynamic ways. CRUW addresses these gaps by bringing together Aboriginal youth in foster care with new immigrant youth. CRUW promotes engagement with a deeply historical Aboriginal relationship to land, using the wellness youth derive from this connection as a catalyst for holistic and sustainable wellness in a diverse urban environment. CRUW is grounded in 4 program objectives: Honouring Our Diversity; Emotional and Cultural Competence; Holistic & Sustainable Urban Wellness; and Mentorship. The core UBC Farm program is the gateway to CRUW. Youth first join as participants, and have the opportunity to return a second year as paid youth mentors. Youth mentors and other alumni then have the opportunity to attend both the Cottonwood Community Garden program, and the Life Skills program. These 3 aspects of CRUW provide a multi-year trajectory of service to 100+ youth annually, empowering them as skilled and healthy agents of change within their communities.
$91,470.00
2014