Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

Access to Music Foundation

Death in a Dumpster: The impact arts engagement has on youth aging out of care

This project is a collaborative venture between youth, our organization, and professional mentors in association with Directions Youth Services that supports our theory of change that sustained arts programming is a viable engagement method that has lasting benefits for street involved youth and youth aging out of care. Research suggests that the arts provide a positive entry point for youth to develop personal agency and is useful in redirecting inappropriate behaviors and ameliorating depression and suicidal ideations. We have evidence of this through our 2 year relationship with DYS where significant numbers of youth expressed a strong need to access creative activities that help them self-assess personal benchmarks. This project responds to that need and also provides a vehicle whereby youth can develop social, leadership, and applied job related skills as they transition into independence. It is critical that youth do not incur any economic burden while participating in this project and that their efforts are recognized through monetary expression. Long range plans are to amass qualitative, quantitative and narrative data; the last of which is documented on film. Research, anticipated outcomes, film documentation and methodology will be shared with other agencies working with these youth populations to encourage a multi-nested systems change to increase funding for arts and media programs and training, program implementation, heightened issues awareness, and advocacy.
$9,875.00
2015

Alberni Drug and Alcohol Prevention Services Society

The B.R.A.V.E. Project - Boys building Resileincy, Values and Empathy

The BRAVE Project (Build, Resiliency, Values and Empower) is a prevention initiative that builds resiliency and critical thinking skills in youth. The program is a recreation-based, skills development group and weekend prevention outreach for boys aged 12-14. Each series of the BRAVE Project runs six weeks and explores the following topics: Media Messaging and Masculinity, Stress and Coping, Violence, Substance Use, Health Promotion and Personal Challenge/Goal Setting. Each session is two and a half hours and consists of topic discussion and a recreation, skill building or art based activity. By utilizing ADAPS' existing community partnerships, participants experience martial arts, wilderness recreation, bicycle mechanics and community based recreation opportunities through our city parks and recreation. Experiential Learning opportunities such as these are delivered in a way that addresses the four quadrants of resiliency building for youth: Independence, Mastery, Generosity, and Belonging. Strong relationships between youth and a caring adult is key in building resiliency. Outreach services to BRAVE participants and their peers are an important part of this prevention program. The Youth Action Outreach Worker is in the community, building relationships with these youth and supporting prevention initiatives at the Nights Alive Program. The outreach component of BRAVE helps youth to develop relationships to their community supports, and to access healthy activities.
$10,000.00
2015

Arthritis Research Canada (ARC)

"It IS About Us". a reference manual for patients participating in health research.

Patient engagement in research occurs when patients meaningfully collaborate in the research process, taking an active role from the start in advising on a research project, project design or carrying out the research. This is important as it contributes greatly to research relevancy, credibility and accountability - issues important to patients. We propose to develop a comprehensive, user friendly manual “It IS About Us" based on over a decade of experience of ARC's Arthritis Patient Advisory Board (APAB). The Board is a diverse group of arthritis patients who have ample expertise with all aspects of arthritis research. In leveraging the knowledge and experience of their involvement in the research process, the manual will support growth and sustainability of infrastructure that will optimize patient engagement in health research. ARC has a strong history of involving patients and is believed to be one of the few research centres in the world that maintains a Patient Advisory Board to promote consumer involvement in research and knowledge translation activities. We will conduct a comprehensive and inclusive study to include all aspects of the patient concerns from their point of view to build capacity for consumer participation in research decision-making and knowledge translation activities through training and provision of ongoing education to new consumer collaborations. Currently, no standard published protocols written by patients for patients are available.
$10,000.00
2015

Association of Neighbourhood Houses of British Columbia

Mount Pleasant Food Recovery Project

Research the feasibility of food cycle intervention to recover usable food from multiple sources, facilitate remanufacturing by local participants and volunteers into a quality source of food for vulnerable populations, specifically seniors, aboriginal, youth and immigrants. We have observed a large amount of fresh produce moving from the local shops to food waste and recycling mechanisms and also aware of large food insecure populations in Mount Pleasant, especially the vulnerable. The feasibility study will scope out: • potential sources of usable waste food produced by businesses and retailers • existing local food recovery practices (e.g. Fruit Tree project) • existing service providers, community based groups, and other groups involved in the local food system, and other potential partners • ascertain ideas and potential projects that would result in a value added conversion process (e.g. explore opportunities to engage the vulnerable in the process; ie provide training and job opportunities, life skills, capacity building and community development) • barriers or challenges faced by stakeholders in food recovery processes, and recommendations on how to address barriers to undertake the a food recovery program • ways to redistribute food that meets stakeholders needs • recommendations for moving forward on plan implementation
$10,000.00
2015

Cedar Cottage Community Advocate Project

It is our intention with this Develop Grant to explore a community based Advocate model. We want to develop a neighbourhood infrastructure to bridge community to systems. The long term goal of this social innovation idea is to train community residents in systemic issues and develop advocate skills. These trained residents will host a Community Advocate hours, a time residents can go to for neighbours to support engagement in systemic support systems like disability and housing. This advocacy support is intended to bridge, navigate, ask questions and reach resolutions. It is the intention of the Neighbourhood House with the support of a Vancouver Foundation Development grant to explore this resident-to-resident community advocate model community to build resiliency, support networks and solidarity of the whole community. By bridging the flow of system knowledge through community-based relationships it will increase the ability of the Neighbourhood House to support individuals to navigate and engage in complex systems necessary to improve upon our communities social determinants of health in the areas of income and social status, social support networks and education and literacy. In our development year we will seek to document and analyze experiences of residents within systems and develop community specific advocate training through a project collective made up of partner organizations and residents guiding the outcomes with the Project Coordinator.
$10,000.00
2015

Aunt Leah's Independent Lifeskills Society

The Canoe Project

The Canoe Project will be designed, organized and implemented by Aunt Leah’s Youth Advisory Committee (YAC). The Cano Project has two core aims: First, we (YAC) will participate again in a week-long canoe journey with the stated goal of "recognizing the past by Pulling Together to enhance understanding between Public Service Agencies and Aboriginal Peoples by canoeing the traditional highway, strengthening our future relations". Our journey last year, from Harrison Lake, down the Fraser, to Semiahmoo was a powerful journey which reconnected us culturally on the water, together eating food and listening to Elders around the fire. It also enhanced our understanding of ourselves as youth from care and our connection to public service agencies. We rowed for 5 days with MCFD Social Workers, RCMP Officers, Chiefs and Elders. We will row again in Summer 2016, but this time we will bring a new cohort of young people with us, expanding the representation of youth from care on the 2016 Pulling Together Canoe Journey (www.pullingtogether.ca) by a factor of two! Second, we plan to present the story publicly of who we are as youth from care, using the Canoe Journey as a metaphor. We hope to work on a small presentation that we can take on the road as a workshop in settings such as schools, service clubs, service agencies and conferences. We will make a small video of our proposed presentation and deliver it at TEDx Kids in hopes of getting our message out to a larger audience.
$10,000.00
2015

BC Centre for Employment Excellence

Top 20 Disability-Confident Companies in Vancouver

Currently, many lists exist outlining the “top 20 diverse companies” or the “top 10 companies to work for”, but the BC Centre for Employment Excellence (BC CFEE) aims to put together a top 20 disability-confident list of employers in British Columbia (BC). This list will be developed to identify companies that are welcoming and inclusive to individuals with disabilities within their workplaces. As well, the disability-confident list of employers will be shared with service providers in the employment services sector in BC or recruiters who work with people with disabilities, which will help increase access to the labour market.
$10,000.00
2015

Bill Reid Gallery of Northwest Coast Art

Reconciliation through Traditional Knowledge and Creativity

Reconciliation as a catalyst for social change. The Bill Reid Gallery honours the legacy of Bill Reid by programming to build bridges among First Nations and between First Nations and other peoples. It plans to leverage this commitment and expertise by working with key partners to develop an adaptable education program designed to engage a wide range of age groups, from K-12, and play an important role in the reconciliation of Aboriginal peoples and other Canadians. This interactive education program will utilize the transformative power of cultural treasures and indigenous knowledge to change basic routines and beliefs by creating a greater awareness of the interconnectedness of all things. Participating students will develop a sense of their place in the world, and an understanding of how ancient knowledge can inform and impact their lives today. This program will be piloted during our upcoming exhibition Land, Sea, People (October 15, 2015 – March 27, 2016) which celebrates the story of Gwaii Haanas, and documents the leadership role it’s playing by developing one of the first integrated land-sea-people plans in Canada. The Gallery will build upon the expertise of key partners like the David Suzuki Foundation, Reconciliation Canada and the Aboriginal Education experts at the Vancouver School Board to ensure scientific and environmental accuracy, cultural sensitivities, and links to new curriculum.
$10,000.00
2015

Britannia Community Services Centre Society

Britannia Community Carving Pavilion

Our social innovation is to test an integrated recreation, education, cultural and social service programming model that builds resilience and empowerment in areas that affect lives in this culturally relevant facility. The objective is to create community driven types of activities that follow values established by the community to guide the stewardship of this important and unique facility. Objectives which focus on 3 core themes: Adhering to specific cultural protocols: 1. Consult and involve Aboriginal Elders 2. Showcase the history of First Peoples 3. Promote cross-cultural sharing and learning Creating standards of practice that are in keeping with the community’s desired values: 4. Build effective governance 5. Make the Carving Pavilion a gathering place 6. Practice inclusivity & embed low-barrier protocols Designing a wide range of programs that promote Aboriginal arts and culture, and provide opportunities for intercultural and intergenerational learning and sharing: 7. Create a community carving project 8. Create for-credit opportunities 9. Showcase Aboriginal art 10. Offer programs beyond carving This is innovative because this model requires formal institutions such as the City of Vancouver, Vancouver School Board, Vancouver Public Library and Vancouver Board of Parks and Recreation to endorse, adopt and participate in non-Western governance and decision making in the delivery of services.
$10,000.00
2015

Cetus Research & Conservation Society

Towards the development of a marine mammal conservation and education program

Our mission is to protect the lives of whales living in or transiting through Johnstone & Georgia Straits while at the same time educating the public about their responsibilities while on the water. Through our programs Straitwatch and Robson Bight Wardens, we engage directly with the public, alerting them to their impact on whales and other marine mammals. We also intervene directly, diverting pleasure and fishing boats from, intentionally or not, harassing or endangering whales. Recreational boating along the BC coast is steadily increasing. This has created an almost untenable situation for the region's orcas and other cetaceans. Death and injury by propellers and abandoned fishing gear, endless noise, disruption of travelling pods and sleep lines, and the relentless invasion of their space has created an ever-more precarious existence for these animals, whose abilities to thrive or even exist are already under threat from over-fishing and climate change. In order to ensure these animals' ability to survive and prosper, it is crucial not only to continue our efforts to inform the public and protect the whales directly; we must also shift the paradigm through which we perceive our relationship with and responsibility to wildlife. Our intention is to broaden the spectrum of those responsible for the welfare and protection of whales from a small coterie of "experts" to the broader public as a whole.
$10,000.00
2015

City of Richmond

Cultivating Wellness Connections in Richmond

Origin- In 2008 with seed funding from the Union of BC Municipalities, Minoru Seniors Society (MSS) together with City of Richmond Senior Services (CORSS) and key community stakeholders, undertook an innovative pilot program to promote social participation and inclusion among vulnerable and isolated older adults. Adapted from leisure education and participation framework Wellness Connections (WC) received a BCRPA Provincial Award of Program Excellence, and was sustained through Vancouver Coastal Health (VCH) funding. Need- WC has served more than 500 English and Mandarin/Cantonese speaking older adults over 7 years. WC plays a unique role in the network of community programs older adults facing multiple barriers to social participation and access to health services. While some are being served, many are not, and the need for high-quality programs that support independence and health is growing, while programs and services are decreasing. Project- With VCH funding for WC now at an end (March 2015), our project aims to harness and expand the successful collaborative approach to serving vulnerable older adults using a community-based participatory research (CBR) process. WC has enable us to build relationships with hundreds of vulnerable older adults in Richmond, providing an unique opportunity in involve them in further breaking down the barriers to social participation and inclusion together with a rich variety of community stakeholders.
$10,000.00
2015

Community Arts Council of Vancouver

WePress

WePress is social enterprise community makerspace that would provide access to equipment and training for DTES residents and organizations for artistic development and capacity building. This innovative space will blend older technology such as the W2 (Woodwards) Reynolds letterpress and an industrial sewing machine with the newer technology of 3D printing. 3D printing can be used to print replacement parts for machines in the makerspace as well as being used to print out type plates for the letterpress that can be used for new printing projects, including many other creative projects with shared technologies. We also have a large historic collection of both English & Chinese typefaces that were saved from the Woodwards shop and the Ho Sung Hing Print Shop. A group of stakeholders including Community Arts Council of Vancouver (CACV), Ho Sun Hing Project Community, Gallery Gachet, Vancouver Letterpress League and several independent artists have been collaborating to create and develop a safe, accessible, affordable makerspace in the Downtown Eastside. Our goal is to have the space become self-sustainable through grassroots participation and social enterprise. The space will welcome diverse populations, including those marginalized by class, sexuality, gender, race, culture, disability, mental health, and addictions. Our collective experience working with wide demographics of oppressed and marginalized people has given us the skills needed to create this accessible space.
$10,000.00
2015

District of North Vancouver

Collaborating to Increase Access to Healthy and Sustainable Food for Children at School

We propose a breakfast program for children at Sherwood Park Elementary School that is prepared at the commercial kitchen at the TWN community centre, transported to and served at the school. We will create a system to rescue and utilize surplus grocery store food in the breakfast. The goal is to create a pilot that is replicable and scalable, incorporates Food Safe protocols for the rescued food, and to develop an operating manual for how to incorporate surplus food into food procurement practices for this and other healthy food access programs. We are looking for support from the Vancouver Foundation to allow us time to build the necessary partnerships, clarify roles and responsibilities and develop protocols and procedures. While we have had preliminary discussions with champions at some of the organizations (TWN and SD44), further work is required before final approvals are in place and there are more organizations and discussions needed to transition our idea into reality. This socially innovative project aims to: Change the resource flows in the social systems of the school and TWN community by redirecting grocery store food that might otherwise go to waste or compost; Change beliefs about the importance of food/nutrition in helping children achieve optimal educational outcomes; Preserve community ‘edible food’ surplus and demonstrate opportunity for higher use of this food; Create opportunities for training hours for PC1 Chefs who work at the TWN commercial kitchen
$9,550.00
2015

Environmental Youth Alliance

Inner-Nature: Developing a Connected Schoolyard Greening Project

THE SOIL - We will work with at least 3 classes at each of: 2 secondary & 1 elementary schools in Vancouver to pilot innovative, experiential learning in schoolyard green spaces. Our aim will be to find ways to engage students and teachers in learning about urban wildlife and creating schoolyard gardens to house a diversity of wild creatures. These programs will combine wildlife and food garden creation with citizen science programming. Our goal in the development phase of this project is to learn with youth & educators how schools can create and USE biodiverse natural spaces on their grounds. THE SCHOOL INSTITUTION - We will meet quarterly with: youth, administrators at each school, coordinators of Community School Teams, the VSB Sustainability Department, Youth Workers in the SACY program, community partners, and local alternate schools to discuss approaches for creating regular, sustainable nature access for vulnerable students. Together we will draft a template Memorandum of Understanding that the EYA can use as a framework to guide our partnerships with VSB schools and Community Hubs in the future. OUR FRIENDS IN THE VSFN - We will continue to meet with these partners to update them on our work with the school institution, and will seek to include multiple organizations from the VSFN in our work. Together we will set common goals, learn how to effectively collaborate and develop a shared narrative that we can use to broadly communicate our work.
$10,000.00
2015

Farm Folk / City Folk

Don't Pocket the Potatoes: Addressing Community Garden Theft in Richmond

While Richmond Food Security Society officially manages the community garden program, we work closely with a wide range of stakeholders. While each stakeholder has shared ideas on how to address the issue of community garden theft, we have yet to form an official project team to address this thoroughly and would like to do so. What we would like to do is form a project team who will work together to research possible solutions. This will include a detailed scan of best practices in other communities, resulting in a detailed webpage where Richmond Community gardeners can learn from. We would also like to conduct a survey of gardeners, in at least 3 languages to find out their personal experience with theft and their ideas to address it. This will provide gardeners with a necessary outlet for their concerns. We would also like to compare the thefts from 2015 to physical site characteristics to determine which physical features may deter thefts. We have only been tracking garden theft data for one year, and would like to track it again in 2016 in order to get a better understanding of the scope of this problem. While we only have data for one year, we have anecdotal and media evidence (through articles in the Richmond review dating back to 2013) that this problem is ongoing.
$10,000.00
2015

Fight With a Stick

Station

Station is about creating a performance design for social encounter. The performance design is a container where a variety of experts and non-experts are put together to hash out pressing social issues . The intent is to use design elements to encourage encounter with difference and to open up the participants mind to a variety of ideas from the humanities. Through an exchange of ideas within the scenographic environment we hope to develop new perspectives and approaches to local issues and connections among participants. Precedents for the performance design and social encounter include our salon serires and aestheticized post-show discussions, as well as other models we have begun to research (see below). Our post-show discussions are unique. Our performances put the audience in a performance machine (examples are described below in #2). The architectural, sonic, and lighting enviroment of the performance is extended to the discussion, making it an extension of the performance, co-created with the audience. Station will take this idea and make it the entirety of the event. In order to achieve this, we will combine what we have already discovered with new reserch into existing models (noted above).We enjoy a diverse, eclectic, and hybrid following. Over the years we have developed inclusive and affordable performance events that do not create social division based on categories of marginalization defined in opposition to an abstract social norm.
$10,000.00
2015

Fraser Health Authority

Postpartum Cardiovascular Risk Reduction in South Asian Women

Pre-eclampsia is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease with up to seven times higher than unaffected women. This risk of cardiovascular disease can occur as early as ten years after the index pregnancy. The postpartum period is a unique window of opportunity to engage young women and address their long-term health needs. South Asian women have an already increased risk of cardiovascular and have a distinctive cardiovascular profile. South Asian women in the Fraser Health region are predominantly newly arrived immigrants who face complex socio-cultural and economic challenges and are therefore particularly disadvantaged. Our social innovation idea is to develop a specialized South Asian postpartum cardiovascular health program that respects culture and builds a treatment plan around the individual needs and values of South Asian women in the Fraser Health region. In order to design such a program, we seek to engage locally affected South Asian women in a participatory approach so that the design and delivery of the program is informed by the priorities and preferences of the women it aims to serve.
$9,932.00
2015

Best at home: Supporting Aboriginal Elders on reserve to age with dignity in their own communities

The development project will bring partners together in 2 partnership meetings in the Fraser Canyon and a minimum of 4 conference calls. A community engagement coordinator chosen by the communities and a project coordinator will organize meetings, facilitate collaborative relationships between partners and conduct an environmental scan using interviews and focus groups with community Elders and their families, community leaders and health providers. The environmental scan will identify supports/services needed by Elders and their families. Approaches to address identified gaps in supports/ services will be developed during the course of the partnership meetings and conference calls. At the end of the project, a comprehensive Elder Wellness plan will be developed to enable Elders to age with dignity and respect at home in their communities. This project is innovative because it: • Focuses on a long overlooked vulnerable population: Aboriginal Elders living on reserve • Is community driven; building internal capacity to seek and find solutions • Is preventative in nature • Reinforces the cultural integrity of Aboriginal communities by keeping Elders at home to the end of their lives • Builds a broad collaborative effort: focussing on positive relationships between partners who have not previously worked together. • Clarifies confusion about availability and extent of resources, eligibility, and oversight by different governing bodies (i.e., provincial or federal).
$9,920.00
2015

Green Thumb Theatre

The Crowd

In 2016, Green Thumb Theatre will partner with Studio 58 to bring a new Canadian play to life. The 15/16 season marks Green Thumb’s 40th anniversary and Studio’s 50th. To celebrate, we are coming together to commission Governor General Award winner George F Walker, arguably the most celebrated English Canadian playwright, to write a new play specifically for Studio 58's post secondary conservatory theatre training program. This project will be immeasurably beneficial to the students working on the play. The bulk of work available to emerging theatre artists in Canada is new work, which continues to be revised and edited right up until opening night. Students will finish this project with a deep understanding of the kind of focus, adaptability and attention to detail required when rehearsing new work, and the rehearsal rooms they enter in the professional sphere will be better for it. Because Walker is writing this play with the specific intent that its inaugural production will be at a theatre school, he will also be able to write to suit the needs of a theatre school, namely, he will be able to write a large cast play for a cast of more than a dozen people – something almost unheard of in contemporary Canadian playwriting. Not only will the play ensure that all students involved will be guaranteed a role they can passionately sink their teeth into, but it will also be one of the first large cast plays written by a celebrated Canadian playwright in the last 20 years.
$10,000.00
2015

Grunt Gallery

Vancouver Independent Archives Week 2015

Our proposed project is the presentation of an inaugural Independent Archives Week (Nov 2015), as a way to build direct community awareness of and interaction with artist-run-centre (ARC) archives in Vancouver. Three leading Vancouver ARCs (grunt gallery, Western Front and VIVO Media Arts Centre), with over 100 years of collective community history will lead the event, organizing a series of free community education/engagement activities and events (archive tours, performances, public talks, screenings, publication, hands-on art/archive youth & family activities). Vancouver artists have a long and recognized history as cultural innovators, activists and archivists – their work, preserved in the distinct collections of the participating centres, has captured moments in Vancouver’s cultural evolution, while at the same time often becoming a catalyst for societal change. The distinct curatorial focus of each centre makes each of these collections unique – it is these differences we hope to highlight and celebrate during Independent Archives Week. The project’s innovation comes from its approach to engagement, one that invites audiences in to our archives and encourages them to share and participate through hands-on immersive activities. The digital age has made us all into our personal ‘archivists’ and ‘curators’ - selecting and preserving photos, video & text that inspire and motivate us. Archives Week works to connect residents to a greater collective community/art heritage.
$10,000.00
2015

GVPTA

Theatre Engagement Project

Metro Vancouver’s theatre community consists of over 80 theatre companies & even more individual artists & co-ops who are creating occasional theatrical projects. There are two large & a couple of mid sized companies & over 70 small to tiny theatre producers. There are cooperative pockets of organizations – primarily based on companies who share physical space, such as Progress Lab and PTC. However, for the most part, the Metro Vancouver theatre community is disconnected and many organizations are struggling in isolation, reaching out to small personal networks for information & support. The community shares core needs – such as the critical need for audience development, the need for professional and organizational development, & effective tools to share resources. And the often expressed need to be “in community” – to have more developed networks & opportunities to convene. To move from a feeling of working in isolation or small networks to a sense of working in community towards a stronger, healthier future. In late 2011 Dawn Brennan & Howard Jang began a series of informal conversations with theatre community members, with the objective of discussing how the Metro Vancouver theatre community could work together to build a stronger industry. In 2013 a steering committee was established; the committee developed and tested values & a Mission: To create a plan that will fuel social engagement and relevance for theatre in Metro Vancouver.
$10,000.00
2015

Heiltsuk Tribal Council

Interactive Travelling Exhibition Sacred Vessels Project Ocean Going Canoes of the Pacific North

Through this project we will support and encourage cross cultural and public awareness about the history and culture of North West Coast maritime Indigenous nations. It will preserve and enhance our ocean going canoe maritime heritage by encouraging aboriginal communities and youth in particular to engage in Tribal Journeys We will share our stories about decolonization and the resurgence of ocean going canoe culture. What was old is new, communities working together for common good, affirming ancestral ties and customary practises. First Nations people and the general public will be served through this communication and public awareness project. We will share traditional native practises, values and world view that has sustained us through the millennia, this can inform sustainable development of natural resources not only for native communities but society as a whole. Our “Sacred Vessels project” plans to develop and create an interactive travelling exhibit that will share the history of the ocean going canoe and the story of its resurgence; where the story will be told by tribal journey participants and canoe families from along the BC coast. The interactive and engaging exhibit with authentic interviews, stories, and artifacts will captivate and inform a wide aboriginal and non-aboriginal audience. Many will benefit from the interactive experience, accompanying programs, offerings and discussions.Our goal is for it to tour most major BC museums and Aboriginal centres
$10,000.00
2015

Heritage BC

Climate Rehabilitation of Heritage Buildings

Our goal is to facilitate investments in the conservation of non residential heritage properties through measures that connect the retention of heritage values with green rehabilitation, improved energy affordability and protection from hazards related to climate change and other risks, such as earthquakes. Opportunities for climate change mitigation include green rehabilitation efforts to improve energy efficiency and smart fuel choices that would help to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, with the added value of reducing operational costs for property owners, building tenants, and developers. Opportunities for climate change adaptation through the protection of heritage property from existing and future potential environmental hazards range from resilience to extreme weather events to seismic upgrades. We are collaborating with RDH Building Engineering to develop proposals for various levels of gov't &provincial utilities to place incentive funds in the Heritage Legacy Fund.Heritage BC would distribute to churches, non profits, museums, first nations,etc for energy efficiency upgrades of heritage buildings. RDH will assist in providing program design recommendations to advance the sustainability and durability of heritage properties through the Heritage Legacy Fund, in a manner that leverages other funding opportunities such as utility demand-side measures (DSM) through BC Hydro and FortisBC, emerging funding opportunities in carbon offsets and local government incentives.
$5,385.00
2015

Inclusion BC

Help! Teeth Hurt: Creating a Business Case for a Pilot Project Special Needs Dental Clinic

The Faculty of Dentistry is currently seeking approval for a deep sedation chair at the Faculty and has paid the fee for approval to the College of Dental Surgeons of BC. We hope to use that chair as a pilot project for a specialized dental clinic (Clinic) for adults with DDs. This innovative Clinic would treat adults with DDs and would be a training centre for students of dentistry, dental hygiene, and anesthesiology, to teach these students to treat adults with DDs. The specialized pilot Clinic would be near UBC hospital, which has an intensive care unit, to ensure utmost safety of patients. This pilot Clinic would provide safe anesthesia as well as training to enable dental professionals to treat adults with DDs in their private dental practices, whenever possible, after graduation. Use of the Clinic for treatment under GA would be less costly and more efficient than using hospital operating rooms and would reduce demand for scarce hospital operating room time. The goal of Help! Teeth Hurt! is to create a business case to confirm the health and economic benefits of using the GA Clinic as an example of best practice for dental care for adults with DDs in BC. The business case will be used by Government, dental and community philanthropists, and the disability community in BC, to help them consider establishing dental surgical GA clinics to enhance access to dental care for BC adults with DDs.
$10,000.00
2015

Instruments of Change

Greenhorn Community Music Project (GCMP)

The Greenhorn Community Music Project (GCMP) provides an accessible weekly after school music program where youth of all ages work with amateur and professional musicians to play music, gain performance skills, create new compositions, perform in the community and become familiar with the inner workings of a working band. The objectives of the GCMP are to: - support youth leadership in the arts - remove barriers for youth involvement in artistic expression - provide an inclusive community-oriented space for people of all ages, cultures and socio-economic status to engage in the arts - build intergenerational connections through transfer of skills between musicians of all ages Young people collaborate in the development and implementation of the music project through relationship building, decision-making, project design and mentorship. The GCMP aims to explore creative collaboration across disciplines, cultures, generations and skill levels while giving participants the tools and the confidence to more effectively work together. The GCMP fosters creative engagement by highlighting that the audience can become the performer at any time by joining rehearsals and performances. The music project will initiate a cascade effect within the community, with people passing on learned skills to others, who do the same and thereby empowering people to realize that they don’t need to be ‘qualified’ or ‘special’ to participate in the creation of their own culture.
$10,000.00
2015

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