Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

BCCDC Foundation for Public Health

Preventing syphilis among HIV-positive gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (gbMSM)

Since 2010, there has been a 4-fold increase in the number of cases of syphilis diagnosed in BC. gbMSM, specifically HIV-positive gbMSM, have carried the disproportionate burden of this epidemic. This is concerning as syphilis enhances the transmission of HIV, and people living with HIV are at higher risk of complications and more severe disease.Other bacterial sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are also more prevalent in the gbMSM population, and similarly enhance HIV transmission. The environment for gbMSM has shifted significantly within the last two decades, with the advent of new drugs (from life-saving HIV medication to more recent HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis) combined with changes in how gbMSM meet sexual partners. Additionally, gbMSM may be adapting their sexual behaviours to reduce their risk of HIV transmission, such as substituting oral sex for anal sex or choosing partners with the same HIV status, which have impacts on risk of STIs. Research has not kept pace with these changes, providing a need for a qualitative research study to understand the current landscape for gbMSM. As part of a larger project, researchers at the BC Centre for Disease Control (BCCDC) plan to test the efficacy of daily doxycycline to prevent new syphilis infections, and its safety and tolerability. While the biomedical aspect of the project is key, the team would focus on examining the further upstream determinants of health associated with syphilis infection in gbMSM.
$173,000.00
2015

Vancouver Aboriginal Child and Family Services Society

Restorative Aboriginal Child Welfare: Research, Practice & Approaches

Youth involved in the 3 youth engagement programs at VACFSS develop positive identity, concrete skills and cultural connections to support their transition out of care. This project will investigate how these programs are effective, determining how we can better utilize Inclusive Foster Care to extend the identified restorative practices to all youth in care at VACFSS. We will maximize the support from Vancouver Foundation by leveraging in-kind supports from a broad network of community partners. Year 1 will involve youth led research on how the Urban Butterflies, Youth Advisory Council (YAC) and Culturally Relevant Urban Wellness (CRUW) programs contribute to setting up diverse Aboriginal youth for success in their transition out of care in concrete and measurable ways. This will involve supporting a group of youth selected from YAC and CRUW as co-researchers throughout the project. The 2nd year will involve a youth-led process of engaging youth in care, caregivers (foster parents), biological family, and community partners, to generate a series of evidence-based recommendations for policy and practice revision at VACFSS. Year 3 will then involve the same group of youth co-researchers in a process of implementing the recommendations alongside a youth-led process of monitoring and evaluation. This same year will also include a process of knowledge exchange, sharing our research, policy development, and outcomes with community partners and other interested stakeholders.
$175,000.00
2015