Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

Ecotrust Canada

Local Economic Development Lab.

The Urban Economic Innovation Lab (the Lab) is a place-based initiative which will generate, implement, and scale innovative community-designed and driven ideas for a vibrant and inclusive local economy in Vancouver’s inner city, with relevance, we hope, for other urban contexts. A deep collaboration between Ecotrust Canada, RADIUS SFU, and a growing number of inner city partners, the Lab is designed to support community organizations, local governments, entrepreneurs and civil society in working together to activate the recently passed Downtown Eastside (DTES) Local Area Plan (LAP), catalyzing opportunities for inner city residents and organizations to increase their economic independence. The Lab will work closely with community stakeholders over three years to identify current challenges, and test potential solutions using rapid prototyping/assessment and business model development methodologies. The Lab will also provide 30 living wage, full-time internship opportunities for graduate students able to advance this work in strategic ways, which helps address a labour market and talent gap in Canada’s social economy through training and development opportunities, while adding rigour to our analysis of what works, and what can be shared.
$100,000.00
2015

Federation of Community Social Services of British Columbia

There is a Better Way - A Social Policy Framework for BC

Why, in one of the wealthiest regions of the world, do we have 90,000 children living in poverty? How do we move from crisis managing sickness to promoting healthier lives? How do we want to treat our seniors, people living with disabilities or addictions, immigrants and First Nations? How do we all want to live together? In 2013/14, Board Voice undertook a provincial campaign advocating for the development of a Social Policy Framework (SPF) for BC, as a way of approaching some of the most challenging and intractable social issues requiring integrated and innovative responses. Through a process of engagement with businesses, municipalities, community partners and citizens, this proposed two year initiative is designed to spark interest in new ideas in the design and delivery of human services in BC, and create the climate for needed change. Key partnerships will provide the networks and help to create the momentum to explore these ideas locally. We expect the project to generate ideas and actions that will make our communities more livable and resilient. The project will have three phases: development of the online platform and content, meeting materials and templates; the coordination of community and online discussions; the collating of the information; drafting and dissemination of a report summarizing the outcomes. Expected key outcomes include engaged networks, increased awareness of social issues and suggested key elements of a SPF for BC.
$100,000.00
2015

Fraser Health Authority

Cultural Safety Policy as a Tool for Improving Access to Primary Health Care for Aboriginal People

In 2011, Fraser Health Aboriginal Health and Simon Fraser University (SFU) were awarded a Canadian Institutes for Health Research Planning Grant which aimed to investigate key primary health care (PHC) research priorities identified by Aboriginal communities in the Fraser region. Following extensive consultation with communities in the region, the most prominent finding from this project was the urgent need to address barriers communities face in accessing basic PHC services. In 2013, Fraser Health, SFU, Stó:lo Nation, and First Nations Health Authority (FNHA) were awarded a Vancouver Foundation Development Grant to build on partnerships and develop a research team to further examine barriers to PHC for Fraser region communities, including the development of a research question and methodology. Community discussions were held, and community participants and partners identified lack of cultural safety in PHC as a key barrier to accessing care and achieving wellness, and named this as their top priority for new research. Throughout both projects, communities called for applied and participatory community research with a focus on policy reform to eliminate the barriers they face in accessing basic PHC. The aim of the current proposed project is to build upon the results of previous research by conducting a community-based participatory research study to examine how cultural safety can be embedded into health policy in the Fraser region.
$90,944.00
2015

Health Arts Society

Health Arts Society Growth to Sustainability Project

Health Arts Society (HAS) provides professional music performances that contribute to the quality of life of people in care. The Society presents 45-minute concerts of one to four performers, generally in series of ten a year, as "Concerts in Care." The hallmark of these concerts is the exceptionally high quality of performance. The value of the concerts is in the pleasure and enrichment they bring to audiences – people in care are as important an audience to serve with first-class music making as any other. Health Arts Society is engaged in an innovative programme to achieve sustainability by 2018, the GROWTH TO SUSTAINABILITY PROJECT. Its two pillars are the raising of a fund of $500,000 and a gradual increase in the revenues developed from the long-term care and retirement homes participating in the programme which will, by then, cover the majority of operating expenses. The result will be that although the Society will continue to grow, and to enlarge its programmes through philanthropic contributions, it will always have a stable foundation. This unusual strength is vital at a time when philanthropic organisations and individual donations cannot each be expected to indefinitely maintain organisations.
$100,000.00
2015

Il Centro

East Van Green

Over the past year Il Centro has developed several new "food system initiatives", specifically an Italian Market (Farmers' Market), a new Community Garden and an active food security education program in partnership with Fresh Roots Urban Farm and Slow Food Vancouver. The East Van Green initiative will build upon, and connect our existing food system activities through a "zero waste" project that will utilize a state of art food "composter" and turn our organic waste into compost which in turn will be used for our community garden and Fresh Root's urban farm located at Vancouver Technical High School-across the street from il Centro. In partnership with a local recycling company (Recycling Alternative) we will establish a closed loop demonstration project that will take organic waste from our garden, catering facilities, restaurant, and the urban farm, (located at Vancouver Technical High School), and turn it into compost for local usage. By linking our community garden, catering/food services, farmers' market, and our partner's local urban farm we hope to create a food system demonstration hub that will engage, educate and promote urban sustainability, local food production, access to local food, and organic waste management. The zero waste project will, we believe, create a micro-community demonstration model that can be replicated and utilized across the city.
$90,000.00
2015

Kamloops Aboriginal Friendship Society

A Place of Belonging

Metis Nation British Columbia (MNBC), Kamloops Aboriginal Friendship Society (KAFS) and Lii Michif Otipemisiwak Family and Community Services (LMO) have collaborated on this joint project with the focus on providing innovative safe supportive housing for vulnerable Aboriginal Youth in Kamloops 19 - 24 yrs of age and who are/have transitioned out of care of the child welfare system or who are currently homeless. We will first address issues of cultural identity, sense of belonging and self-esteem by providing supportive living arrangements for vulnerable Aboriginal Youth. This grounds our Aboriginal youth in culture and spiritual support, while simultaneously providing a safe place to stay. The Youth will then be better equipped with tools to grow into productive young members of society, provided with distinctly individual pathways available to them. This unique housing arrangement will be a starting place for youth to develop life skills while learning healthy skills with positive strong paths forward. Aboriginal Youth are disconnected from their Communities and require a strong sense of security in ones-self, to successfully transition into functional young Aboriginal adults. Aboriginal Youth need to start at square one, which involves finding out who they are, what their culture is and what it means to them and having pride in their sense of identity.
$100,000.00
2015

Lower Mainland Purpose Society for Youth and Families

Burnaby Youth Hub - Headspace Initiative

The Burnaby Youth Hub (“the Hub”) improves access to youth-centric services by offering a unique one-stop shop of services in a safe and empowering environment. In collaboration with a number of other partners, the Hub functions to provide young people with the opportunity and access to a comprehensive set of resources to foster a productive future as independent, engaged members of the community. In order to continue to provide innovative support that is responsive to the unique and varied needs of the young people in our community, the Hub will be launching a new framework of integrative care specifically addressing and de-stigmatizing mental health among youth. Modeled after the Australian Headspace initiative, this new approach will build off of existing foundations to better serve the needs of youth in Burnaby, as identified and articulated by the youth requiring and accessing these services. This innovative new framework will see greater focus on building holistic, compassionate, and inclusive services in a centralized design, structured around four core pillars: mental health, physical & sexual health, capacity-building (including education and employment skills), and advocacy. Under this new initiative, the voices and experiences of young people will be included throughout the process of program design and implementation, and the self-identified needs of youth in the community will drive the nature of the services provided at the Hub.
$100,000.00
2015

Ready to Rent BC Association

Building Capacity through Education

Building Capacity through Education will build upon the recent Peers for Housing Stability initiative. Though Peers, R2R developed a youth-specific course and trained youth facilitators to co-facilitate 20 RentReady sessions in the Lower Mainland. Emerging feedback from community partners has indicated a demand for capacity building to deliver the training in-house, both the youth-specific RentReady course as well as the broader, certificate-backed RentSmart course. In speaking to youth, R2R has also identified the need to develop tools that address roommate living situations, often a requirement for affordability but legally in the grey zone and a source of many issues and conflicts. Finally, there is a need for increased awareness and expansion of the Ready to Rent model amoung landlords and housing providers in the Lower Mainland. The goals for Building Capacity are as follows: - to train community organizations in the Lower Mainland to become RentSmart and RentReady facilitators and be able to deliver the curriculum to their youth populations - to increase awareness of the RentSmart certificate amoung landlords and housing providers - to pilot and implement RentSmart within the public, alternative and aboriginal school systems - to develop tools, resources and supports to assist youth to identify and navigate successful roommate living situations
$100,000.00
2015

Sierra Club of British Columbia Foundation

From the Ground up: Empowering BC communities to protect coastal temperate rainforest

Forested watersheds on Vancouver Island and BC’s South Coast are being heavily logged with negative impacts to water quality and availability, wildlife habitat, carbon stores, local economies, and our collective resilience against climate change. Only approx. 8% of the forested area of Vancouver Island and 6% of the forested area of the South Coast are protected and most of the productive old-growth has been logged. Regulations requiring the forest industry to self-monitor are ineffective at maintaining ecosystem health. Community members have become increasingly disconnected from the state of the forests in their region due to a lack of information and options for meaningful input. One of the ways to convince provincial decision-makers to implement conservation policy solutions is when they are pressured to do so by a diverse network of citizens; and the public will only get involved when they understand the impacts of forest practices in their backyard. To this end, the social innovation we are testing is to empower communities with localized information on forest health, to motivate people to monitor logging impacts in their watersheds and build support for improved forest practices. Through localized maps, public events, strategic communications, and a ‘gumboots on the ground' strategy to get people out monitoring watersheds, we will raise public awareness of the importance of forest conservation for wildlife habitat, a diverse economy, carbon values, and clean water.
$100,000.00
2015

Tides Canada Initiatives Society

re-VALUE (Validating All Livelihoods in Urban Environments)

With the shared goal of bringing together binners to help them achieve their aims, the re-VALUE project will collaborate with several partners including the UBC Learning Exchange, City of Vancouver and SFU Woodward’s Cultural Unit – Vancity Office of Community Engagement to reach out to broad community stakeholders and test informal employment opportunity pilots that were identified by binners over the past year. To support successful implementation of the pilots, the Binners' Project (BP) will simultaneously carry out complementary initiatives to raise public awareness and build binner community and capacity. In this way the re-VALUE (Validating All Livelihoods in Urban Environments) project will increase binner involvement and credibility in civic governance and planning for policies on waste, recycling and the container refund. The BP has been successful in bringing together a robust binner community, thus far engaging over 300 binners. Through regular meetings, workshops and activities, we have built a sense of trust and belonging as well as a safe place for individuals to voice their opinions and concerns. This project will meaningfully engage binners in conversations with community stakeholders and positively influence and build individual and binner group capacities.
$100,000.00
2015