Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

Alberni Drug and Alcohol Prevention Services Society

The B.R.A.V.E. Project - Boys building Resileincy, Values and Empathy

The BRAVE Project (Build, Resiliency, Values and Empower) is a prevention initiative that builds resiliency and critical thinking skills in youth. The program is a recreation-based, skills development group and weekend prevention outreach for boys aged 12-14. Each series of the BRAVE Project runs six weeks and explores the following topics: Media Messaging and Masculinity, Stress and Coping, Violence, Substance Use, Health Promotion and Personal Challenge/Goal Setting. Each session is two and a half hours and consists of topic discussion and a recreation, skill building or art based activity. By utilizing ADAPS' existing community partnerships, participants experience martial arts, wilderness recreation, bicycle mechanics and community based recreation opportunities through our city parks and recreation. Experiential Learning opportunities such as these are delivered in a way that addresses the four quadrants of resiliency building for youth: Independence, Mastery, Generosity, and Belonging. Strong relationships between youth and a caring adult is key in building resiliency. Outreach services to BRAVE participants and their peers are an important part of this prevention program. The Youth Action Outreach Worker is in the community, building relationships with these youth and supporting prevention initiatives at the Nights Alive Program. The outreach component of BRAVE helps youth to develop relationships to their community supports, and to access healthy activities.
$10,000.00
2015

Cariboo Chilcotin Partners for Literacy Society

Families as Learning Leaders

Our goal is to increase vulnerable parent’s involvement and participation in their children's early literacy and education. Vulnerable parents’ voices are critical to understanding their needs, strengths, and barriers to engaging in their child’s learning, but are rarely heard in systems. This project will involve parents as both co-creators and recipients of improved approaches to family engagement in children’s learning. We will document and share parents' and practitioners knowledge to inform dialogue and action at the organizational, and network systems change scale, and ultimately reshape how schools, organizations & community networks engage with & involve vulnerable families. The project has originated through our ongoing work with vulnerable families, children, and adult learners, in partnership with existing community networks. We will work with parents and staff at early childhood & elementary schools to design and deliver a new model for engaging vulnerable families in their child’s learning. A social change lab approach will hold the voices of those affected at the centre, as parents, staff & kindergarten teachers will participate as equals in this iterative process to design, test, implement & learn from new family engagement models. The goal is to develop a model that can be embedded in the existing systems, will continue to hear the voices of parents as the model evolves, and be scaled through organizations and community networks that serve vulnerable families.
$25,000.00
2015

Community Social Planning Council of Greater Victoria

Youth Employment Development for the Capital Region

This is a Youth Employment Development Initiative to prototype and test best practices and models we have identified in other places in Canada to create effective labour market pathways for young people who are disadvantaged. We have conducted research for the Enterprising Non Profit Program and the BC Centre for Employment Excellence on models in other jurisdictions of employment development systems inclusive of "employment social enterprises" to create pathways for young people to sustainable livelihoods. We discovered that there are best practices in engaging and promoting employer partnerships with community training agencies that are market based and entrepreneurial We are proposing to adapt and test these models in our own region which currently lacks infrastructure for youth employment development. We also intend to engage a larger group of stakeholders in BC in a learning community on our experiences and lessons learned to inform practices in other regions, through our partnerships with the Canadian Community Economic Development Network and the BC Centre for Employment Excellence. We will have a strong evaluation component to test impacts on income, skills and educational attainment, and employment to share with policy and program stakeholders to embrace more innovative and effective public policy. We will test this model in growth sectors of the economy that also have sustainability impacts, like the resource recycling and renewable energy sectors.
$50,000.00
2015

Courthouse Libraries BC BC Family Justice Innovation Lab

British Columbia Family Justice Innovation Lab

BC’s family justice system has traditionally focused on judicial decision-making and an adversarial approach to disputes. Too often it negatively affects the physical and mental health of adults and children. Despite myriads of reports, the system has failed to change itself sufficiently to address this reality. We are seeking funding for the BC Family Justice Innovation Lab, initiated by a group of reform-minded justice system leaders in 2014. Its goal is to improve the well-being of BC children and families experiencing separation and divorce. Its core approach is experimental (developing and evaluating scalable prototypes), systemic (defining the system from the perspective of families) and participatory (engaging cross-sector organizations and system users). The first three initiatives under the Lab's umbrella focus on providing families with viable and affordable collaborative approaches to resolution of their problems outside of court: 1. Northern Navigator project (collaboration of a local community social service organization, mediators and the judiciary) assesses the needs of family litigants and refer them to mediation before court 2. Collaborative Practice Pro Bono project provides free interdisciplinary collaborative practice services to families 3. Family Mediation Sliding Scale project offers affordable mediation services. The Lab will generate systemic learning through developmental evaluation and nurture scaleable prototypes.
$120,000.00
2015

Kamloops Aboriginal Friendship Society

A Place of Belonging

Metis Nation British Columbia (MNBC), Kamloops Aboriginal Friendship Society (KAFS) and Lii Michif Otipemisiwak Family and Community Services (LMO) have collaborated on this joint project with the focus on providing innovative safe supportive housing for vulnerable Aboriginal Youth in Kamloops 19 - 24 yrs of age and who are/have transitioned out of care of the child welfare system or who are currently homeless. We will first address issues of cultural identity, sense of belonging and self-esteem by providing supportive living arrangements for vulnerable Aboriginal Youth. This grounds our Aboriginal youth in culture and spiritual support, while simultaneously providing a safe place to stay. The Youth will then be better equipped with tools to grow into productive young members of society, provided with distinctly individual pathways available to them. This unique housing arrangement will be a starting place for youth to develop life skills while learning healthy skills with positive strong paths forward. Aboriginal Youth are disconnected from their Communities and require a strong sense of security in ones-self, to successfully transition into functional young Aboriginal adults. Aboriginal Youth need to start at square one, which involves finding out who they are, what their culture is and what it means to them and having pride in their sense of identity.
$100,000.00
2015

Living Positive Resource Centre, Okanagan

The Bright Side Youth Project

The social innovation idea we would like to move on with Vancouver Foundation development funds is to explore in partnership with community agencies the recent social innovations in youth sexual health programming. We aim to determine the best program for reaching vulnerable Okanagan youth and how we can build and manage strategic and institutional partnerships to bring any identified program development to sustainable fruition. We want to identify a recent social innovation idea in the delivery of youth-based sexual health prevention programs that has been successful in other regions and that could be modified into an innovative program in the Okanagan. The coming together to develop programming for Okanagan youth is in and of itself an innovative step for this community.
$10,000.00
2015

Lower Mainland Purpose Society for Youth and Families

Burnaby Youth Hub - Headspace Initiative

The Burnaby Youth Hub (“the Hub”) improves access to youth-centric services by offering a unique one-stop shop of services in a safe and empowering environment. In collaboration with a number of other partners, the Hub functions to provide young people with the opportunity and access to a comprehensive set of resources to foster a productive future as independent, engaged members of the community. In order to continue to provide innovative support that is responsive to the unique and varied needs of the young people in our community, the Hub will be launching a new framework of integrative care specifically addressing and de-stigmatizing mental health among youth. Modeled after the Australian Headspace initiative, this new approach will build off of existing foundations to better serve the needs of youth in Burnaby, as identified and articulated by the youth requiring and accessing these services. This innovative new framework will see greater focus on building holistic, compassionate, and inclusive services in a centralized design, structured around four core pillars: mental health, physical & sexual health, capacity-building (including education and employment skills), and advocacy. Under this new initiative, the voices and experiences of young people will be included throughout the process of program design and implementation, and the self-identified needs of youth in the community will drive the nature of the services provided at the Hub.
$100,000.00
2015

Psychology Foundation of Canada

Pathways to Resiliency

The overall objective of the project is to build capacity within newcomer communities to equip parents, teachers and other caregivers with the tools to help their infants, toddlers and young children to get off to the best start possible and to equip them with the skills to foster and enhance their mental health throughout their lives. Research tells us that to build resiliency skills we must start in the prenatal stages and give children the tools to help them build those skills that will help them throughout their lives. This means that we need to provide parents, teachers and others who work with infants, toddlers and children with the information, programs and tools so they can work with the children in their care. For the past few years we have been building relationships and working with several newcomer groups to develop resources and programs that would address their expressed need for programs for parents and support for trainers and teachers who work with the families. This project would promote healthy parent-child relationships and offer substantial protection by building coping skills and emotional regulation abilities for life. Parents will learn about attachment activities and how stress affects their children as they grow and develop. Children will learn to identify their stressors and will learn age appropriate stress management techniques. We need to identify and support members of newcomer groups and work with them to build capacity in their communities.
$10,000.00
2015

School District #37 - Delta

HYPE - Healthy Youth Program for Everyone

Our HYPE project is intended to improve the Social Determinants of Health (SDI) by offering pre-teens and teens an opportunity to take an active leadership role in their community and offering innovative ways to engage the community’s young people. The HYPE program will offer teens the opportunity to participate in the following SDI areas: a) SDI - Social Support Networks, b) SDI – Education, c) SDI – Employment/Working Conditions, d) SDI – Personal Health Practices and coping Skills, e) SDI - Healthy Childhood Development The program is based on numerous best practices in Youth Community Development that has trained and nurtured youth to be active in their community to improve or make aware opportunities to improve Social Determinants of Health. The TEST is to develop the first ever-comprehensive Teen program in North Delta. Teens will improve the above SDI’s through their involvement in developing the and participating in the following Areas: 1. Teen arts, recreation & sport programs [Addresses SDI’s a), b) & d)]. 2. Leadership training, workshops and mentoring and practicum placements particularly in the form of Teens creating and leading community programs and services for children, pre-teens and youth. [Addresses SDI’s a), b), c), e)]. Teens will be supported in creating it all: including resource (assets mapping), funding acquisition, youth advisory councils, marketing and supervising of programs and events.
$10,000.00
2015

South Vancouver Family Place

Life as a Grandparent

South Vancouver Family Place (SVFP), South Vancouver Neighbourhood House (SVNH) & Marpole Oakridge Family Place (MOFP) propose to provide an innovative project that supports the collaboration of the 3 agencies in the development and facilitation of a project that supports and encourages the ability of immigrant grandparents, their families and their grandchildren in creating a healthy, caring and supportive environment. This project will be tailored to the specific needs of isolated immigrant grandparents and their young grandchildren ages 0 to 5 years. We will be testing the model of this unique 3 agency partnership, the different modules of programming and the resources developed. We will also test how to disseminate the information we collect. The orginal idea came out of an eight month pilot project with SVFP. We developed some tools, did some assessment and research and that is the foundation of this proposal. The 3 agencies then developed this project with the support of our networks early years group. South Vancouver has one of the largest populations of immigrant seniors, and young children in the City. Local statistics indicate that up to 60% of the caregivers in our community are immigrant grandparents. Many are isolated due to language and cultural issues, having to care for young grandchildren, health and finances to name a few.
$10,000.00
2015

The BLT Society

Parenting the Positive Discipline Way

When it comes to seeking advise on “how to make my child behave?” parents are flooded with an overwhelming, disparate, vast volume of information from a variety of sources. Other parents, grandparents, family members, books, TV shows, the web, and social media all contribute to the prodigious amount of conflicting recommendations on the best way to raise a child. The BLT Society would like to create a new model for parents to turn to in seeking guidance on sound child rearing practices. Parenting the Positive Discipline Way could become the new “norm” in our culture. Parents as teachers in everyday life have a huge responsibility because the impact they have is tremendous. Parents can teach problem solving, impulse control, the healthy expression of all feelings, patience and tolerance. Unfortunately there seems to be increasing numbers of young people with poor coping skills, substance misuse, violent and bullying behaviour, and unhealthy ways of engaging in conflict. The BLT would like to go into three cities in BC (Dawson Creek, Fort St. John and Fort Nelson) and train 12 parent educators in each community. Then the BLT would, support two newly trained parent educators in offering a seven-week parent class in their community.
$10,000.00
2015

Vancouver Child and Youth Advocacy Centre

Vancouver Child and Youth Advocacy Centre Pilot Project

This project is to complete a 3 year pilot project to establish a Child and Youth Advocacy Centre (CYAC) within the City of Vancouver. The specific vision for this centre is a co-located, multi-disciplinary, child centered approach to services for children who have experienced abuse and their non-offending family members and/or caregivers. In 2011, a group of mandated stakeholders came together and completed a two year comprehensive Needs Assessment and Feasibility Study to see if the need existed in Vancouver for a CYAC. The results of this first phase demonstrated both a need in Vancouver for a CYAC and that the stakeholders believed this project was feasible. Quantitative data demonstrated enough cases to warrant a CYAC. The qualitative data from this study was incredibly compelling, as it suggested that co-location of services for children/youth who experience abuse in Vancouver has the potential to reduce the barriers to joint interviews and reduce the travel time for children/youth and their non-offending family members. Any elimination of barriers could address possible under-reporting of child physical and sexual abuse. Following this, the stakeholders completed phase 2 - the development of a pilot project. After extensive research of CYAC models, the group believed that a not for profit was the appropriate model. This project (phase 3) will test and evaluate the establishment and operation of a CYAC in Vancouver.
$140,000.00
2015