Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

Bill Reid Gallery of Northwest Coast Art

Reconciliation through Traditional Knowledge and Creativity

Reconciliation as a catalyst for social change. The Bill Reid Gallery honours the legacy of Bill Reid by programming to build bridges among First Nations and between First Nations and other peoples. It plans to leverage this commitment and expertise by working with key partners to develop an adaptable education program designed to engage a wide range of age groups, from K-12, and play an important role in the reconciliation of Aboriginal peoples and other Canadians. This interactive education program will utilize the transformative power of cultural treasures and indigenous knowledge to change basic routines and beliefs by creating a greater awareness of the interconnectedness of all things. Participating students will develop a sense of their place in the world, and an understanding of how ancient knowledge can inform and impact their lives today. This program will be piloted during our upcoming exhibition Land, Sea, People (October 15, 2015 – March 27, 2016) which celebrates the story of Gwaii Haanas, and documents the leadership role it’s playing by developing one of the first integrated land-sea-people plans in Canada. The Gallery will build upon the expertise of key partners like the David Suzuki Foundation, Reconciliation Canada and the Aboriginal Education experts at the Vancouver School Board to ensure scientific and environmental accuracy, cultural sensitivities, and links to new curriculum.
$10,000.00
2015

Decoda Literacy Foundation

Micro-credentials for adult literacy learners

Decoda Literacy Solutions is adopting the Mozilla Open Badge concept to provide a literacy and essential skills credential system for adults who participate in community-based literacy programs. These programs are generally outside of formal education systems and do not have transcripts and certificates to identify learning. The use of a micro-credential system will assist in improving program completion rates for adult learners, as well as increased support as they move to further education and employment. Literacy practitioners across the province have agreed that this would be an important step forward. Together with volunteer literacy tutors and adult learners, they have provided input about how the credential system should look and work in general. Digital micro-credentials, such as open badges, are a new way to capture and communicate what an individual knows and can demonstrate. They can represent more granular specific skills or achievements than most credentials issued in formal education systems. A set of open digital badges for adult literacy program participants has been developed based on current commonly used competency benchmarks. This project will test the use of that set of badges as well as the development of further relevant badges by adult literacy learners. It will also provide a basis for introducing the badges to employers, employment agencies and other education providers to test the value of the credentials where adults will use them.
$150,000.00
2015

Ecotrust Canada

Local Economic Development Lab.

The Urban Economic Innovation Lab (the Lab) is a place-based initiative which will generate, implement, and scale innovative community-designed and driven ideas for a vibrant and inclusive local economy in Vancouver’s inner city, with relevance, we hope, for other urban contexts. A deep collaboration between Ecotrust Canada, RADIUS SFU, and a growing number of inner city partners, the Lab is designed to support community organizations, local governments, entrepreneurs and civil society in working together to activate the recently passed Downtown Eastside (DTES) Local Area Plan (LAP), catalyzing opportunities for inner city residents and organizations to increase their economic independence. The Lab will work closely with community stakeholders over three years to identify current challenges, and test potential solutions using rapid prototyping/assessment and business model development methodologies. The Lab will also provide 30 living wage, full-time internship opportunities for graduate students able to advance this work in strategic ways, which helps address a labour market and talent gap in Canada’s social economy through training and development opportunities, while adding rigour to our analysis of what works, and what can be shared.
$100,000.00
2015

PeerNet BC

Building Inclusive Schools in Districts without Anti-homophobia Policies

According to a survey conducted by EGALE, "70% of all participating students, LGBTQ and non-LGBTQ, reported hearing expressions such as “that’s so gay” every day in school and almost half (48%) reported hearing remarks such as “faggot,” “lezbo,” and “dyke” every day in school. Schools and community based organizations, including Vancouver School Boards part-time Anti-homophobia and Diversity Consultant often request training from PeerNetBC to strengthen *Gender and Sexuality Alliances throughout BC as the need arises. As a result PeerNetBC partnered with Vancouver Coastal Health to write a curriculum manual on how to set up GSAs in local communities. PeerNetBC would like to test a proactive innovative project by formalizing support systems for GSAs across BC. By working alongside local community partners, PeerNetBC will support students and teachers who are struggling with existing GSAs as well as helping create new GSAs particularity in school districts without anti-homophobia or transgender inclusion policies. EGALE’s survey also indicated that almost two thirds (64%) of LGBTQ students and 61% of students with LGBTQ parents reported that they feel unsafe at school.” PeerNetBC will utilize youth engagement strategies to create and strengthen these GSAs to build healthy, vibrant and livable school communities especially for vulnerable and marginalized youth so students can focus on their education free from discrimination. *Formally known as Gay/Straight Alliance
$10,000.00
2015

Ray-Cam Co-operative Centre

OUR PLACE Graduation Strategy - Transitions from Elementary to Secondary School

OUR PLACE Graduation Strategy is a partnership of residents, community-based organizations, schools and service providers working collaboratively to support the growth, education and healthy development of children in Vancouver’s inner city. The Graduation Strategy is a comprehensive place-based initiative designed to improve graduation rates for inner city children. The school-based programs are based at secondary school, elementary level and adult education. Comprehensive supports include: tutoring, peer support, mentorship, primary health care and assessments, family support, sports and recreation, counselling and advocacy. OUR PLACE Graduation Strategy builds from local experience research, assets and strengths in this community (DTES/Strathcona). OUR PLACE Graduation Strategy aims to engage students, parents, teachers’ and partners to ensure solutions through participation, seeing people as citizens able to contribute rather than clients to be serviced. We link to and work with influential champions to inform relevant public policy to ensure continuity and sustainability of these place-based responses. Working differently and moving towards a culture of collaboration and collective impact is a key goal of OUR PLACE Graduation Strategy. This specific project will address the gap for children 9 to 14 to ensure there are coordinated supports connecting schools, parents, children and youth and community organizations to work towards successful transitions in school.
$10,000.00
2015

School District #39 - Vancouver

Cultivating the School Food System

Cultivating the School Food System is about empowering teachers and students in learning, growing and serving healthy food. When students have access to healthy, local, and delicious food, it is believed that that academic confidence will increase and discipline and behavioural issues decrease. , , Students learn better when they eat healthy food. We connect this work to the “Good Food” movement in Canada and the United States which focuses on food that is: healthy, green, fair, and affordable. , CSFS is a multifaceted, collaborative approach to enhance student learning, support teacher and staff innovation in teaching, and eating healthy, delicious, local food. It aims to shift attitudes and behaviours of students and support teachers and food providers to make systemic change in teaching practice and food provision. Programs support students across the VBE, focusing on vulnerable youth in E. and S. Vancouver, in Renfrew Collingwood, and Victoria-Fraserview, regions where youth food insecurity and poverty are prominent. CSFS addresses: Food Literacy: CSFS is transformative on-site learning for students. Creating opportunities for experiential and inquiry-based learning, it hosts training for educators; year-round field to fork programming for students, prepares youth with employment skills. Access: CSFS provides healthy, schoolyard farm grown food for the school community. It supports healthy school meal programs by facilitating an expert working group comprised of VBE staff, community partners, and FR to recommend and implement strategies for increasing food access. School Food System (SFS): CSFS inspires and supports schools to make large-scale shifts in purchasing, food service operations and student meal choices through a bundle of programs under the working title “BC Wednesdays.” This grant will support the teachers that want to do more. Already three schools have self-identified as wanting to participate in BC Wednesdays.
$150,000.00
2015

School District #63 - Saanich

Choosing a Path for the Future

Our innovative idea to find innovative ways to support the sense of belonging for our Indigenous students by increasing student and staff capacity regarding Indigenous ways of knowing and learning. Our hope is through education we will find reconciliation for all of our indigenous learners and their families which will improve the grade to grade transition of our students and ultimately have more students graduating from school and crossing the stage with "dignity, options, and purpose." By providing inservice, training and experiential opportunities for teachers to learn about Indigenous ways of knowing and learning through intergeneration learning and teacher we will help teachers to broaden their understanding of integrating culturally relevant and meaningful learning opportunities for Indigenous students while providing non-indigenous students with rich learning connected to the lands and history of their surroundings. Our primary focus and vision is to provide educators with the tools, knowledge, skills, and learning opportunities that will help them see that Indigenous Education is for everyone and together with their colleagues they will have the capacity to transform these systems through an increased cultural competency and practice.
$10,000.00
2015

School District #67 - Okanagan Skaha

Through a Different Lens

The focus of this project is on the regular classroom: making learning more engaging and relevant for all students – rather than removing students to other programs. We are attempting to remove some of the barriers to success that many of our vulnerable students face (eg., over reliance on reading and writing); create strength-based classrooms where students can use their strengths to learn in alternative ways (technology, filming, creating, building, comics, interviews); and provide rich, relevant and meaningful learning opportunities. We began with in-class innovations in teaching and learning and are now supporting cross curricular and “outside” the classroom experiences – in the environment, on the reserve, and in intergenerational settings. Our application for a grow grant is to reach more classrooms and go deeper in those that have already been involved. Our school district has consistently achieved an 80-85% Six Year Completion Rate. The 10-15% of students that do not graduate consist of students of Aboriginal ancestry, students with a behavioural designation, students who have had difficulty with literacy through their school careers, and issues such as anxiety, drugs, alcohol. The two biggest groups are students of Aboriginal ancestry and those with behavioural designations. We have students as young as grade 9 leaving school. The school district has some alternative schools, career education, and other support systems, which support many students.
$150,000.00
2015

UBC - Department of Political Science

Summer Institute for Future Legislators (SIFL)

This project will support the ongoing development of an education program for people who are interested in participating in elected civic roles at all levels of government.
$105,000.00
2015

Vancouver Island University

Inside-Out Prison Exchange Program

The “Inside-Out Prison Exchange Program" offers prison-based post-secondary academic courses to groups composed of both university students (hereinafter called outside learners) and incarcerated students (hereinafter called inside learners) who learn together. Founded in 1997 in Philadelphia by one university professor inspired by one incarcerated man, the program is based on the simple hypothesis that incarcerated men and women and college/university learners might mutually benefit from studying together as peers. Together, they build classroom communities based on dialogue, collaboration and serious, shared inquiry. The Inside-Out Program places a human face on justice issues while giving both inside and outside learners a powerful academic and experiential learning opportunity, grounded in a philosophy recognizing that each human being has innate worth and a story to tell. Expansion of Inside-Out into Canada offers the chance to implement and evaluate the program’s impact in a country with a different population and systems. VIU will be among the first five universities in Canada, and the second Criminology department, to offer Inside-Out, building on the successful experiences of over 140 US universities and colleges.
$30,000.00
2015