Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

Association of Neighbourhood Houses of British Columbia

Mount Pleasant Food Recovery Project

Research the feasibility of food cycle intervention to recover usable food from multiple sources, facilitate remanufacturing by local participants and volunteers into a quality source of food for vulnerable populations, specifically seniors, aboriginal, youth and immigrants. We have observed a large amount of fresh produce moving from the local shops to food waste and recycling mechanisms and also aware of large food insecure populations in Mount Pleasant, especially the vulnerable. The feasibility study will scope out: • potential sources of usable waste food produced by businesses and retailers • existing local food recovery practices (e.g. Fruit Tree project) • existing service providers, community based groups, and other groups involved in the local food system, and other potential partners • ascertain ideas and potential projects that would result in a value added conversion process (e.g. explore opportunities to engage the vulnerable in the process; ie provide training and job opportunities, life skills, capacity building and community development) • barriers or challenges faced by stakeholders in food recovery processes, and recommendations on how to address barriers to undertake the a food recovery program • ways to redistribute food that meets stakeholders needs • recommendations for moving forward on plan implementation
$10,000.00
2015

Cedar Cottage Community Advocate Project

It is our intention with this Develop Grant to explore a community based Advocate model. We want to develop a neighbourhood infrastructure to bridge community to systems. The long term goal of this social innovation idea is to train community residents in systemic issues and develop advocate skills. These trained residents will host a Community Advocate hours, a time residents can go to for neighbours to support engagement in systemic support systems like disability and housing. This advocacy support is intended to bridge, navigate, ask questions and reach resolutions. It is the intention of the Neighbourhood House with the support of a Vancouver Foundation Development grant to explore this resident-to-resident community advocate model community to build resiliency, support networks and solidarity of the whole community. By bridging the flow of system knowledge through community-based relationships it will increase the ability of the Neighbourhood House to support individuals to navigate and engage in complex systems necessary to improve upon our communities social determinants of health in the areas of income and social status, social support networks and education and literacy. In our development year we will seek to document and analyze experiences of residents within systems and develop community specific advocate training through a project collective made up of partner organizations and residents guiding the outcomes with the Project Coordinator.
$10,000.00
2015

West End Community Food Centre

The Community Food Centre we envision in Vancouver's West End takes a 3-pronged approach to addressing inequities in our food system, in a way that is rooted in the right to food. We will work with existing emergency food resources in our community to transition to providing people who access them with healthy, fresh food in a dignified environment. We aim to develop community capacity, skills and engagement for producing and preparing food through a comprehensive suite of skill-building and educational programs offered at various locations in our community, and we aim to hire, develop, train and support a group of peer advocates to operate in our community to challenge the systemic issues which create and entrench poverty. While each of these approaches has the potential to drive change on one scale or another, a community's level of food security is generally understood to embody each of the three prongs working in synergy. By providing individuals with multiple points of access to varying levels and scales of support and advocacy, we create the necessary conditions for a nimble response to the specific issues and concerns of our community. The West End Community Food Centre will be based on a model in which programs and initiatives are animated in various locations throughout our community (this may change down the road). Starting with programs in satellite sites throughout a community is also the model of growth for most of Vancouver's Neighbourhood Houses.
$110,000.00
2015

Britannia Community Services Centre Society

Britannia Community Carving Pavilion

Our social innovation is to test an integrated recreation, education, cultural and social service programming model that builds resilience and empowerment in areas that affect lives in this culturally relevant facility. The objective is to create community driven types of activities that follow values established by the community to guide the stewardship of this important and unique facility. Objectives which focus on 3 core themes: Adhering to specific cultural protocols: 1. Consult and involve Aboriginal Elders 2. Showcase the history of First Peoples 3. Promote cross-cultural sharing and learning Creating standards of practice that are in keeping with the community’s desired values: 4. Build effective governance 5. Make the Carving Pavilion a gathering place 6. Practice inclusivity & embed low-barrier protocols Designing a wide range of programs that promote Aboriginal arts and culture, and provide opportunities for intercultural and intergenerational learning and sharing: 7. Create a community carving project 8. Create for-credit opportunities 9. Showcase Aboriginal art 10. Offer programs beyond carving This is innovative because this model requires formal institutions such as the City of Vancouver, Vancouver School Board, Vancouver Public Library and Vancouver Board of Parks and Recreation to endorse, adopt and participate in non-Western governance and decision making in the delivery of services.
$10,000.00
2015

District of North Vancouver

Collaborating to Increase Access to Healthy and Sustainable Food for Children at School

We propose a breakfast program for children at Sherwood Park Elementary School that is prepared at the commercial kitchen at the TWN community centre, transported to and served at the school. We will create a system to rescue and utilize surplus grocery store food in the breakfast. The goal is to create a pilot that is replicable and scalable, incorporates Food Safe protocols for the rescued food, and to develop an operating manual for how to incorporate surplus food into food procurement practices for this and other healthy food access programs. We are looking for support from the Vancouver Foundation to allow us time to build the necessary partnerships, clarify roles and responsibilities and develop protocols and procedures. While we have had preliminary discussions with champions at some of the organizations (TWN and SD44), further work is required before final approvals are in place and there are more organizations and discussions needed to transition our idea into reality. This socially innovative project aims to: Change the resource flows in the social systems of the school and TWN community by redirecting grocery store food that might otherwise go to waste or compost; Change beliefs about the importance of food/nutrition in helping children achieve optimal educational outcomes; Preserve community ‘edible food’ surplus and demonstrate opportunity for higher use of this food; Create opportunities for training hours for PC1 Chefs who work at the TWN commercial kitchen
$9,550.00
2015

Federation of Community Social Services of British Columbia

There is a Better Way - A Social Policy Framework for BC

Why, in one of the wealthiest regions of the world, do we have 90,000 children living in poverty? How do we move from crisis managing sickness to promoting healthier lives? How do we want to treat our seniors, people living with disabilities or addictions, immigrants and First Nations? How do we all want to live together? In 2013/14, Board Voice undertook a provincial campaign advocating for the development of a Social Policy Framework (SPF) for BC, as a way of approaching some of the most challenging and intractable social issues requiring integrated and innovative responses. Through a process of engagement with businesses, municipalities, community partners and citizens, this proposed two year initiative is designed to spark interest in new ideas in the design and delivery of human services in BC, and create the climate for needed change. Key partnerships will provide the networks and help to create the momentum to explore these ideas locally. We expect the project to generate ideas and actions that will make our communities more livable and resilient. The project will have three phases: development of the online platform and content, meeting materials and templates; the coordination of community and online discussions; the collating of the information; drafting and dissemination of a report summarizing the outcomes. Expected key outcomes include engaged networks, increased awareness of social issues and suggested key elements of a SPF for BC.
$100,000.00
2015

Fraser Health Authority

Best at home: Supporting Aboriginal Elders on reserve to age with dignity in their own communities

The development project will bring partners together in 2 partnership meetings in the Fraser Canyon and a minimum of 4 conference calls. A community engagement coordinator chosen by the communities and a project coordinator will organize meetings, facilitate collaborative relationships between partners and conduct an environmental scan using interviews and focus groups with community Elders and their families, community leaders and health providers. The environmental scan will identify supports/services needed by Elders and their families. Approaches to address identified gaps in supports/ services will be developed during the course of the partnership meetings and conference calls. At the end of the project, a comprehensive Elder Wellness plan will be developed to enable Elders to age with dignity and respect at home in their communities. This project is innovative because it: • Focuses on a long overlooked vulnerable population: Aboriginal Elders living on reserve • Is community driven; building internal capacity to seek and find solutions • Is preventative in nature • Reinforces the cultural integrity of Aboriginal communities by keeping Elders at home to the end of their lives • Builds a broad collaborative effort: focussing on positive relationships between partners who have not previously worked together. • Clarifies confusion about availability and extent of resources, eligibility, and oversight by different governing bodies (i.e., provincial or federal).
$9,920.00
2015

Inclusion BC

Help! Teeth Hurt: Creating a Business Case for a Pilot Project Special Needs Dental Clinic

The Faculty of Dentistry is currently seeking approval for a deep sedation chair at the Faculty and has paid the fee for approval to the College of Dental Surgeons of BC. We hope to use that chair as a pilot project for a specialized dental clinic (Clinic) for adults with DDs. This innovative Clinic would treat adults with DDs and would be a training centre for students of dentistry, dental hygiene, and anesthesiology, to teach these students to treat adults with DDs. The specialized pilot Clinic would be near UBC hospital, which has an intensive care unit, to ensure utmost safety of patients. This pilot Clinic would provide safe anesthesia as well as training to enable dental professionals to treat adults with DDs in their private dental practices, whenever possible, after graduation. Use of the Clinic for treatment under GA would be less costly and more efficient than using hospital operating rooms and would reduce demand for scarce hospital operating room time. The goal of Help! Teeth Hurt! is to create a business case to confirm the health and economic benefits of using the GA Clinic as an example of best practice for dental care for adults with DDs in BC. The business case will be used by Government, dental and community philanthropists, and the disability community in BC, to help them consider establishing dental surgical GA clinics to enhance access to dental care for BC adults with DDs.
$10,000.00
2015

Kamloops and District Elizabeth Fry Society

Life Skills Development Project

The Life Skills Development Project (LSDP) consists of 2 key pieces: My Place, a weekly, drop-in based life skills and service navigation program resulting from a community-wide needs assessment; and the Life Skills Network (LSN), a group of community professionals working in the area of housing and life skills who come together to build working relationships, identify and address gaps in life skills programming, and oversee My Place. The life skills topics at My Place are facilitated by members of the LSN. Workshop topics range from to tenancy rights to communication to conflict resolution to budgeting, etc. The goal of the drop-in is to provide professionally facilitated, peer-driven discussion related to finding and maintaining housing, and improving quality of life. This structure allows clients to self-identify their needs in a safe, non-judgmental setting that they have ownership in. My Place also provides information about services in the community, and resources to assist individuals in reaching the support they need. A pilot stage of the LSDP has been completed and evaluated. Through this process, a refined product is being developed that supports collaboration and gives an active voice to our most vulnerable citizens. In the coming year, we hope to continue this success through a seamless transition from the project’s pilot stage, to a well-developed and sustainable program. We need to test our refined program and continue to develop it to meet community needs.
$10,000.00
2015

Kitsilano War Memorial Community Centre

Exploring/Creating Models in Inter & Multi Generational Child Care

We would like to use a development grant to hire a child care systems analyst to create a business plan in order to offer Inter and Multi Generational Child Care within the Kitsilano Community Centre. This will include researching and presenting required building upgrades, licensing, staffing, accreditation requirements, training, support, and methods of volunteer recognition.
$10,000.00
2015

Little Mountain Neighbourhood House Society

Heart, Health, 'Hood: Learning. Living. Leading.

Heart, Health,‘Hood is an inter-sectoral program addressing isolation, health, engagement of marginalized & underserved individuals (immigrants, refugees, people with disabilities, seniors). It reduces barriers of exclusion through connection, collaboration, education, engagement. Social determinants of health are discussed & acted upon through dialogue, resource sharing, interactive lessons, goal setting, small project design & delivery. This innovation builds a vibrant community through development of personal health/financial/community goals, & a subsequent project where participants work together to improve their own, & the community’s health. Component (1): [‘HEART’: participant-focused health knowledge]; BCIT student nurses facilitate cross-cultural health activities, dialogue, & group learning that puts issues affecting marginalized groups at the forefront. Participants choose relevant topics that shape the program & set goals for personal & collective health. Component (2): [‘HEALTH’: employment/financial empowerment]; Vancity staff share tools for employment/financial wellbeing/volunteering. Participants develop goal–setting action plans & best practices for financial security, employment, volunteering. Component (3): [‘HOOD’ projects that care for community]. Participants review action plans & choose a project to collaborate & mentor each other on, through application & delivery of a neighbourhood small grant focused on a social determinant of health.
$7,428.00
2015

Nelson CARES Society

Moving Together Phase III: Implementing a Transporation Action Plan for Kootenay Boundary Seniors

Moving Together Phases I & II: A Collaborative Approach to Addressing Seniors’ Transportation Barriers (2014, funded by Vancouver Foundation) identified specific transportation service gaps and barriers. A project Working Group of local stakeholders including local/regional transit managers, seniors, community services, and regional/municipal government developed solutions in three categories: Transit, Interior Health/Community Transportation Services, and Public Education & Marketing. The recommendations were presented to a larger regional-provincial stakeholder group that worked together to identify challenges and opportunities for implementation. The most promising recommendations emerging from this gathering were formulated into an Action Plan. Moving Together Phase III: Implementing a Transportation Action Plan for Kootenay Boundary Seniors, will operationalize the Action Plan in two segments: 1) A Transportation Animator position to connect seniors to appropriate transportation services, raise community awareness of seniors transportation challenges (including health professionals and community services providers), and promote collaboration among transportation providers; and, 2) Policy, Practice & Project Development to further develop and/or implement the remaining recommendations through participation in wider transportation initiatives with partner groups, i.e. the West Kootenay Transit Committee, City of Nelson, and Interior Health (IH).
$85,000.00
2015

PACE Society

The Sex Worker Peer Health Navigator Program

To address systems-level barriers that undermine health and social care access among Sex Workers, the Sex Worker Peer Health Navigator (PHN) program will provide culturally safe assistance with systems-navigation to assist Sex Workers in accessing health and social resources (e.g., primary care, specialist care, housing) critical to their health and well being. Building upon our expertise in providing peer­driven services, Peer Support Workers (current or former Sex Workers) working in collaboration with the Peer Health Programs Coordinator (registered social worker) will provide case coordination and peer accompaniment services to promote health care access and assist Sex Workers in following up on health and social services referrals. Importantly, program staff will work in coordination with diverse community partners to provide individualized support and support to Sex Workers following discharge from health settings (e.g., hospital, substance use treatment) to promote positive community transitions and follow-up care. This program recognizes that social determinants of health, such as homelessness and social isolation, adversely impact the health of Sex Workers and will leverage community partnerships to increase access to housing and other social supports. Program staff will also facilitate weekly peer support groups to promote social inclusion and positive care­seeking strategies. Please note that a detailed program logic model is available upon request.
$137,800.00
2015

PHC

Inter-Island Network for Innovative Community Mental Wellness

The health service system upon which we are often dependent is primarily structured to serve large population groups in cities and is inadequate or absent in our small island communities of Gabriola, Quadra, Denman and Hornby Islands. We want to transform the way we think about and respond to mental health and substance use issues at the community level and in turn transform how we interact with the broader systems we are a part of. Our project is designed to have two focuses: the first is to replicate Denman and Hornby Island's successful local health network on the other two islands and establish an Inter-Island Network. The second is to initiate a local program in each community that will address a social inclusion issue identified as a local priority and that will act as a test for the effectiveness of the Inter-Island Network. The Inter-Island Network will begin to act as an innovation hub, linking the community networks as a way to share ideas and resources and to work collaboratively with our other partners; the Rural and Remote Division of Family Practice, Islands Trust and Island Health. The network will provide a means for our communities to collaborate with large organizations and to seek new and alternate sources of funding. As a result, we will have established and/or strengthened our local health services and community organizations, increasing our capacity to address mental health and substance use issues and the broader social determinants of health
$25,000.00
2015

Ready to Rent BC Association

Innovating to Prevent Homelessness

Innovating to Prevent Homelessness is an evidence-gathering initiative focused on adapting R2R’s ‘success based housing’ approach to increase housing stability, reduce evictions, support crisis-free moves and prevent homelessness within three pilot communities. Ready to Rent is a homelessness prevention models that is scalable and adaptable to meet the needs of many. Innovating to Prevent Homelessness will work with three communities new to the R2R model, and will gather data on demographics, beneficiary experience, impact on damages and evictions with their related costs, frequency of crisis-free moves and overall housing stability. 6 – 8 stakeholders identified by BC Housing, AHMA, and R2R will lead the initiative in partnering communities. A local organization will take the lead, and beneficiaries will be included in gathering baseline data, adaptation of course materials, and overall oversight of the initiative. Innovating to Prevent Homelessness will measure impact through before-and-after comparison data, as well as the development of skills, knowledge and confidence of participants. Activities will include: • gather baseline data • identify existing community supports • identify gaps in services • deliver professional development and train the trainer workshops • support an educational prevention approach in each community • measure the impact of the R2R model • collaborate on community-based prevention strategies, policies and systems
$10,000.00
2015

SPARC BC Society

Moving Forward Together: A Strategy to End Homelessness in Metro Vancouver

Funding under the Federal Homelessness Partnering Strategy (HPS) no longer includes the critical capacity building work previously done by the Regional Steering Committee on Homelessness (RSCH). This proposal is submitted on behalf of the RSCH Plan Advisory Committee to identify potential partnerships and opportunities to continue to support and advance this critical work intended to: • Provide a focus for regional discussion and decisions around homelessness; • Provide a framework for the planning, coordination and the development of housing services and supports for people who are homeless or at risk of homelessness; • Reflect leading practices while at the same time provide an opportunity for RSCH partners and members to learn from each other; • Bring together key regional partners to build increased awareness and public support around issues related to homelessness; • Facilitate coordination as well as build and strengthen existing partnerships and relationships; • Leverage additional funding and resources to support the implementation of the key goals, objectives, strategies and actions set out in the updated Regional Homelessness Plan. SPARC BC will serve as the administrative host for the project and will provide research, facilitation and evaluation support to help facilitate on-going collaboration across municipal and regional leaders who care about this issue and who believe that through caring and collaborative action, we can end homelessness.
$10,000.00
2015

The Mustard Seed

The Capital Regional District Food Rescue

The CRD Food Rescue is about rescuing good, edible and healthy fresh food from heading to the landfill or laying on the farmer's field. Food Banks for the past 30 years have been alleviating food insecurity, but have not addressed the root causes of poverty causing individuals to access social supports. Moreover, non-perishables, which have been the staple of food banks, have created long-term health issues for vulnerable communities as they are high in sugar and sodium. Our project is about reclaiming fresh foods, diverting it from the landfill, gleaning it, then re-distributing it to local non-profit agencies not only to increase the health outcomes of their clients, but also to cut agency food budgets so as to increase spending on supportive or poverty elimination programs, specifically housing supports. Most importantly however, with such high expected volumes of food, we will create a social enterprise where low-income earners who do not access food banks, but are food insecure due to economic barriers, may access this project through extremely subsidized cost. This would not be the sale of the food so as not to cut into the market share of retailers, but for the service of distribution including online component and operations costs. This piece would be linked to income levels to ensure a different customer base than our retail partners. We project generating 30% of our operations cost in the form of revenue within the first 3 years and 50% within 5 years.
$50,000.00
2015

Tides Canada Initiatives Society

re-VALUE (Validating All Livelihoods in Urban Environments)

With the shared goal of bringing together binners to help them achieve their aims, the re-VALUE project will collaborate with several partners including the UBC Learning Exchange, City of Vancouver and SFU Woodward’s Cultural Unit – Vancity Office of Community Engagement to reach out to broad community stakeholders and test informal employment opportunity pilots that were identified by binners over the past year. To support successful implementation of the pilots, the Binners' Project (BP) will simultaneously carry out complementary initiatives to raise public awareness and build binner community and capacity. In this way the re-VALUE (Validating All Livelihoods in Urban Environments) project will increase binner involvement and credibility in civic governance and planning for policies on waste, recycling and the container refund. The BP has been successful in bringing together a robust binner community, thus far engaging over 300 binners. Through regular meetings, workshops and activities, we have built a sense of trust and belonging as well as a safe place for individuals to voice their opinions and concerns. This project will meaningfully engage binners in conversations with community stakeholders and positively influence and build individual and binner group capacities.
$100,000.00
2015

Volunteer Victoria

Stage Based Solutions for Volunteers Aging In Place

To meet the gaps generated by shifting demographics Volunteer Victoria will need significantly more information, strategies, and tools to support one, two, or all of the following groups: a. senior volunteers aging out of their current volunteer positions, b. agencies relying on large numbers of senior volunteers aging in place and/or staging out of volunteering, and c. organizations that serve seniors to become more efficient and innovative in how they use, train, and recruit and retain volunteers The process involves: Forming an advisory committee made up of seniors and senior serving agencies Developing and implementing a methodology and system to collect data from a minimum of 500 seniors and 250 local organizations Designing research questions and formats for gathering information and reviewing the landscape Identifying potential partners who share a vision to serve seniors more effectively Reviewing the data and making recommendations with the advisory group Assessing the development phase Working with partners to articulate a shared vision and preferred outcomes moving forward Developing a 3 to 5 year program plan that involves multiple stakeholders groups and seniors in a scaleable model
$10,000.00
2015

West Kootenay Women's Association Nelson & District Women's Centre

Rooted in Community

To create an innovative and comprehensive community-based volunteer training program accessible to all residents in the Nelson area. The training will be using an anti-oppression framework and include workshops from a variety of different social service organizations discussing the services they offer, the challenges they address in the community and volunteer opportunities in their organizations. The training will take place over several weeks, giving participants not only the time necessary to find the right fit between themselves and a volunteer opportunity, but also to create connections and a network of support with each other.
$8,220.00
2015