Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

Decoda Literacy Foundation

Micro-credentials for adult literacy learners

Decoda Literacy Solutions is adopting the Mozilla Open Badge concept to provide a literacy and essential skills credential system for adults who participate in community-based literacy programs. These programs are generally outside of formal education systems and do not have transcripts and certificates to identify learning. The use of a micro-credential system will assist in improving program completion rates for adult learners, as well as increased support as they move to further education and employment. Literacy practitioners across the province have agreed that this would be an important step forward. Together with volunteer literacy tutors and adult learners, they have provided input about how the credential system should look and work in general. Digital micro-credentials, such as open badges, are a new way to capture and communicate what an individual knows and can demonstrate. They can represent more granular specific skills or achievements than most credentials issued in formal education systems. A set of open digital badges for adult literacy program participants has been developed based on current commonly used competency benchmarks. This project will test the use of that set of badges as well as the development of further relevant badges by adult literacy learners. It will also provide a basis for introducing the badges to employers, employment agencies and other education providers to test the value of the credentials where adults will use them.
$150,000.00
2015

District of North Vancouver

Collaborating to Increase Access to Healthy and Sustainable Food for Children at School

We propose a breakfast program for children at Sherwood Park Elementary School that is prepared at the commercial kitchen at the TWN community centre, transported to and served at the school. We will create a system to rescue and utilize surplus grocery store food in the breakfast. The goal is to create a pilot that is replicable and scalable, incorporates Food Safe protocols for the rescued food, and to develop an operating manual for how to incorporate surplus food into food procurement practices for this and other healthy food access programs. We are looking for support from the Vancouver Foundation to allow us time to build the necessary partnerships, clarify roles and responsibilities and develop protocols and procedures. While we have had preliminary discussions with champions at some of the organizations (TWN and SD44), further work is required before final approvals are in place and there are more organizations and discussions needed to transition our idea into reality. This socially innovative project aims to: Change the resource flows in the social systems of the school and TWN community by redirecting grocery store food that might otherwise go to waste or compost; Change beliefs about the importance of food/nutrition in helping children achieve optimal educational outcomes; Preserve community ‘edible food’ surplus and demonstrate opportunity for higher use of this food; Create opportunities for training hours for PC1 Chefs who work at the TWN commercial kitchen
$9,550.00
2015

Ecotrust Canada

Local Economic Development Lab.

The Urban Economic Innovation Lab (the Lab) is a place-based initiative which will generate, implement, and scale innovative community-designed and driven ideas for a vibrant and inclusive local economy in Vancouver’s inner city, with relevance, we hope, for other urban contexts. A deep collaboration between Ecotrust Canada, RADIUS SFU, and a growing number of inner city partners, the Lab is designed to support community organizations, local governments, entrepreneurs and civil society in working together to activate the recently passed Downtown Eastside (DTES) Local Area Plan (LAP), catalyzing opportunities for inner city residents and organizations to increase their economic independence. The Lab will work closely with community stakeholders over three years to identify current challenges, and test potential solutions using rapid prototyping/assessment and business model development methodologies. The Lab will also provide 30 living wage, full-time internship opportunities for graduate students able to advance this work in strategic ways, which helps address a labour market and talent gap in Canada’s social economy through training and development opportunities, while adding rigour to our analysis of what works, and what can be shared.
$100,000.00
2015

Environmental Youth Alliance

Inner-Nature: Developing a Connected Schoolyard Greening Project

THE SOIL - We will work with at least 3 classes at each of: 2 secondary & 1 elementary schools in Vancouver to pilot innovative, experiential learning in schoolyard green spaces. Our aim will be to find ways to engage students and teachers in learning about urban wildlife and creating schoolyard gardens to house a diversity of wild creatures. These programs will combine wildlife and food garden creation with citizen science programming. Our goal in the development phase of this project is to learn with youth & educators how schools can create and USE biodiverse natural spaces on their grounds. THE SCHOOL INSTITUTION - We will meet quarterly with: youth, administrators at each school, coordinators of Community School Teams, the VSB Sustainability Department, Youth Workers in the SACY program, community partners, and local alternate schools to discuss approaches for creating regular, sustainable nature access for vulnerable students. Together we will draft a template Memorandum of Understanding that the EYA can use as a framework to guide our partnerships with VSB schools and Community Hubs in the future. OUR FRIENDS IN THE VSFN - We will continue to meet with these partners to update them on our work with the school institution, and will seek to include multiple organizations from the VSFN in our work. Together we will set common goals, learn how to effectively collaborate and develop a shared narrative that we can use to broadly communicate our work.
$10,000.00
2015

Farm Folk / City Folk

The Smart Farm Project - Phase 2

The Smart Farm Project proposes adapting smart growth principles to small farm acreages outside the Agricultural Land Reserve in rural communities to catalyze new farms across BC. With a combination of low footprint design, progressive local planning, non-profit or public oversight, social investment and farming know-how, the Smart Farm Project leverages increased density to create affordable homes and farming opportunities, boost agriculture production and generate more jobs for the local economy at the same time. In 2013, a group of stakeholders completed Phase 1 of The Smart Farm Project-a detailed report analyzing four Smart Farm proposals on four different land holdings on the Sunshine Coast. Phase 2 of The Smart Farm Project will: 1) launch an outreach strategy to catalyze Smart Farm proposals in multiple regions across Southern BC, 2) develop the legal and financing frameworks to ensure these developments are community-owned and operated, and 3) coordinate a series of forums with local government, provincial authorities, legal professionals and farm proponents to draft a development application process that support implementation of small farm co-housing developments outside the ALR.
$25,000.00
2015

Don't Pocket the Potatoes: Addressing Community Garden Theft in Richmond

While Richmond Food Security Society officially manages the community garden program, we work closely with a wide range of stakeholders. While each stakeholder has shared ideas on how to address the issue of community garden theft, we have yet to form an official project team to address this thoroughly and would like to do so. What we would like to do is form a project team who will work together to research possible solutions. This will include a detailed scan of best practices in other communities, resulting in a detailed webpage where Richmond Community gardeners can learn from. We would also like to conduct a survey of gardeners, in at least 3 languages to find out their personal experience with theft and their ideas to address it. This will provide gardeners with a necessary outlet for their concerns. We would also like to compare the thefts from 2015 to physical site characteristics to determine which physical features may deter thefts. We have only been tracking garden theft data for one year, and would like to track it again in 2016 in order to get a better understanding of the scope of this problem. While we only have data for one year, we have anecdotal and media evidence (through articles in the Richmond review dating back to 2013) that this problem is ongoing.
$10,000.00
2015

Federation of Community Social Services of British Columbia

There is a Better Way - A Social Policy Framework for BC

Why, in one of the wealthiest regions of the world, do we have 90,000 children living in poverty? How do we move from crisis managing sickness to promoting healthier lives? How do we want to treat our seniors, people living with disabilities or addictions, immigrants and First Nations? How do we all want to live together? In 2013/14, Board Voice undertook a provincial campaign advocating for the development of a Social Policy Framework (SPF) for BC, as a way of approaching some of the most challenging and intractable social issues requiring integrated and innovative responses. Through a process of engagement with businesses, municipalities, community partners and citizens, this proposed two year initiative is designed to spark interest in new ideas in the design and delivery of human services in BC, and create the climate for needed change. Key partnerships will provide the networks and help to create the momentum to explore these ideas locally. We expect the project to generate ideas and actions that will make our communities more livable and resilient. The project will have three phases: development of the online platform and content, meeting materials and templates; the coordination of community and online discussions; the collating of the information; drafting and dissemination of a report summarizing the outcomes. Expected key outcomes include engaged networks, increased awareness of social issues and suggested key elements of a SPF for BC.
$100,000.00
2015

Fight With a Stick

Station

Station is about creating a performance design for social encounter. The performance design is a container where a variety of experts and non-experts are put together to hash out pressing social issues . The intent is to use design elements to encourage encounter with difference and to open up the participants mind to a variety of ideas from the humanities. Through an exchange of ideas within the scenographic environment we hope to develop new perspectives and approaches to local issues and connections among participants. Precedents for the performance design and social encounter include our salon serires and aestheticized post-show discussions, as well as other models we have begun to research (see below). Our post-show discussions are unique. Our performances put the audience in a performance machine (examples are described below in #2). The architectural, sonic, and lighting enviroment of the performance is extended to the discussion, making it an extension of the performance, co-created with the audience. Station will take this idea and make it the entirety of the event. In order to achieve this, we will combine what we have already discovered with new reserch into existing models (noted above).We enjoy a diverse, eclectic, and hybrid following. Over the years we have developed inclusive and affordable performance events that do not create social division based on categories of marginalization defined in opposition to an abstract social norm.
$10,000.00
2015

Fraser Health Authority

Cultural Safety Policy as a Tool for Improving Access to Primary Health Care for Aboriginal People

In 2011, Fraser Health Aboriginal Health and Simon Fraser University (SFU) were awarded a Canadian Institutes for Health Research Planning Grant which aimed to investigate key primary health care (PHC) research priorities identified by Aboriginal communities in the Fraser region. Following extensive consultation with communities in the region, the most prominent finding from this project was the urgent need to address barriers communities face in accessing basic PHC services. In 2013, Fraser Health, SFU, Stó:lo Nation, and First Nations Health Authority (FNHA) were awarded a Vancouver Foundation Development Grant to build on partnerships and develop a research team to further examine barriers to PHC for Fraser region communities, including the development of a research question and methodology. Community discussions were held, and community participants and partners identified lack of cultural safety in PHC as a key barrier to accessing care and achieving wellness, and named this as their top priority for new research. Throughout both projects, communities called for applied and participatory community research with a focus on policy reform to eliminate the barriers they face in accessing basic PHC. The aim of the current proposed project is to build upon the results of previous research by conducting a community-based participatory research study to examine how cultural safety can be embedded into health policy in the Fraser region.
$90,944.00
2015

Postpartum Cardiovascular Risk Reduction in South Asian Women

Pre-eclampsia is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease with up to seven times higher than unaffected women. This risk of cardiovascular disease can occur as early as ten years after the index pregnancy. The postpartum period is a unique window of opportunity to engage young women and address their long-term health needs. South Asian women have an already increased risk of cardiovascular and have a distinctive cardiovascular profile. South Asian women in the Fraser Health region are predominantly newly arrived immigrants who face complex socio-cultural and economic challenges and are therefore particularly disadvantaged. Our social innovation idea is to develop a specialized South Asian postpartum cardiovascular health program that respects culture and builds a treatment plan around the individual needs and values of South Asian women in the Fraser Health region. In order to design such a program, we seek to engage locally affected South Asian women in a participatory approach so that the design and delivery of the program is informed by the priorities and preferences of the women it aims to serve.
$9,932.00
2015

Best at home: Supporting Aboriginal Elders on reserve to age with dignity in their own communities

The development project will bring partners together in 2 partnership meetings in the Fraser Canyon and a minimum of 4 conference calls. A community engagement coordinator chosen by the communities and a project coordinator will organize meetings, facilitate collaborative relationships between partners and conduct an environmental scan using interviews and focus groups with community Elders and their families, community leaders and health providers. The environmental scan will identify supports/services needed by Elders and their families. Approaches to address identified gaps in supports/ services will be developed during the course of the partnership meetings and conference calls. At the end of the project, a comprehensive Elder Wellness plan will be developed to enable Elders to age with dignity and respect at home in their communities. This project is innovative because it: • Focuses on a long overlooked vulnerable population: Aboriginal Elders living on reserve • Is community driven; building internal capacity to seek and find solutions • Is preventative in nature • Reinforces the cultural integrity of Aboriginal communities by keeping Elders at home to the end of their lives • Builds a broad collaborative effort: focussing on positive relationships between partners who have not previously worked together. • Clarifies confusion about availability and extent of resources, eligibility, and oversight by different governing bodies (i.e., provincial or federal).
$9,920.00
2015

Georgia Strait Alliance

Building community strength and resilience to oil spills in vulnerable coastal areas

This project represents a social innovation that can be executed within a medium-term timeframe and contributes to an over-arching societal shift - away from a belief system that accepts as inevitable our dependence on fossil fuels and towards a system which acknowledges the inherent risks in this dependence and works toward a clean energy future. In a time of growing concerns about global climate change and with our increasing recognition of the local impacts of oil spills, this project works from the ground up to change how communities prepare for and invest in local oil spill response and stand together to voice their opposition to projects like Kinder Morgan’s pipeline expansion. Kinder Morgan’s proposal would greatly increase the risk of a spill that would devastate local communities and ecosystems and significantly contribute to climate change. By working with local governments and individuals to identify and address gaps in local oil spill preparedness and response, the project will address the imbalance of resources, power and knowledge that currently prevents local governments from adequately planning for oil spills. This will increase the ability of vulnerable communities, and the people who will be most directly affected by a spill, to have a voice in creating a strengthened spill response regime which will protect and restore their local natural habitats and ecosystems and foster community resilience.
$54,000.00
2015

Global Youth Education Network Society

Next UP grow program

Next UP is our flagship program at genius. Next UP (NU) is an intensive seven-month leadership program for young people age 18-32 who are committed to working on social justice issues, environmental issues and climate change. Next UP began eight years ago in Vancouver and now operates programs in Vancouver, Calgary, Edmonton, Saskatoon, Winnipeg and Ottawa. We have 384 graduates across the country with about 120 of them in BC. After 8 years of delivering and refining the NU program we want to offer new formats and versions of the program to different constituencies over the next three years. Next UP grow will allow us to deepen the scope and impact of our work and grow our network of social change leaders. The full-length NU programs run from September through to the following May. Each fall people apply to get in to the various NU programs and at the end of each selection process 12-16 participants are invited to form a program cohort in each program city. The program is free of cost to all participants and funding dependent we can provide support for childcare and participant travel. The cohort meets 1 evening a week and 1 full Saturday a month over the course of the 7 months and participants do work to explore their own leadership styles, learn about solutions to topical issues, develop key leadership skills and receive training in an array of areas to provide them with an excellent tool kit to draw upon in their respective leadership journeys.
$77,000.00
2015

Greater Vancouver Professional Theatre Alliance Society

Theatre Engagement Project

Metro Vancouver’s theatre community consists of over 80 theatre companies & even more individual artists & co-ops who are creating occasional theatrical projects. There are two large & a couple of mid sized companies & over 70 small to tiny theatre producers. There are cooperative pockets of organizations – primarily based on companies who share physical space, such as Progress Lab and PTC. However, for the most part, the Metro Vancouver theatre community is disconnected and many organizations are struggling in isolation, reaching out to small personal networks for information & support. The community shares core needs – such as the critical need for audience development, the need for professional and organizational development, & effective tools to share resources. And the often expressed need to be “in community” – to have more developed networks & opportunities to convene. To move from a feeling of working in isolation or small networks to a sense of working in community towards a stronger, healthier future. In late 2011 Dawn Brennan & Howard Jang began a series of informal conversations with theatre community members, with the objective of discussing how the Metro Vancouver theatre community could work together to build a stronger industry. In 2013 a steering committee was established; the committee developed and tested values & a Mission: To create a plan that will fuel social engagement and relevance for theatre in Metro Vancouver.
$10,000.00
2015

Greater Vancouver Society to Bridge Arts and Community

SpaceFinder Vancouver

The Society to Bridge Arts & Community is leading a local consortium of organizations in launching the digital platform SpaceFinder in Vancouver. SpaceFinder is a free online matchmaking tool for artists and art spaces, intended to help facilitate the connection between artists and space. It provides extensive search functions with a focus on short or medium term rentals of creative spaces for rehearsal, performance, film production, workshops, & other arts related activities. SpaceFinder was designed by Fractured Atlas, an American based national non-profit arts service organization. It is currently in use in 11 US and two Canadian cities. This is a well-tested tool with thousands of current users. Operating in Toronto since November 2014, SpaceFinder users have found it to be an easy to use system that meets the needs of renting and/or finding space. As an accessible, free marketplace, SpaceFinder can be used by any size organization regardless of budget. The City of Vancouver and the Social Purpose Real Estate networks both have simple creative space directories. They lack the technological sophistication to contain detailed information and complex search functions based on the needs of artists and creative spaces.
$71,000.00
2015

Green Thumb Theatre

The Crowd

In 2016, Green Thumb Theatre will partner with Studio 58 to bring a new Canadian play to life. The 15/16 season marks Green Thumb’s 40th anniversary and Studio’s 50th. To celebrate, we are coming together to commission Governor General Award winner George F Walker, arguably the most celebrated English Canadian playwright, to write a new play specifically for Studio 58's post secondary conservatory theatre training program. This project will be immeasurably beneficial to the students working on the play. The bulk of work available to emerging theatre artists in Canada is new work, which continues to be revised and edited right up until opening night. Students will finish this project with a deep understanding of the kind of focus, adaptability and attention to detail required when rehearsing new work, and the rehearsal rooms they enter in the professional sphere will be better for it. Because Walker is writing this play with the specific intent that its inaugural production will be at a theatre school, he will also be able to write to suit the needs of a theatre school, namely, he will be able to write a large cast play for a cast of more than a dozen people – something almost unheard of in contemporary Canadian playwriting. Not only will the play ensure that all students involved will be guaranteed a role they can passionately sink their teeth into, but it will also be one of the first large cast plays written by a celebrated Canadian playwright in the last 20 years.
$10,000.00
2015

Grunt Gallery

Vancouver Independent Archives Week 2015

Our proposed project is the presentation of an inaugural Independent Archives Week (Nov 2015), as a way to build direct community awareness of and interaction with artist-run-centre (ARC) archives in Vancouver. Three leading Vancouver ARCs (grunt gallery, Western Front and VIVO Media Arts Centre), with over 100 years of collective community history will lead the event, organizing a series of free community education/engagement activities and events (archive tours, performances, public talks, screenings, publication, hands-on art/archive youth & family activities). Vancouver artists have a long and recognized history as cultural innovators, activists and archivists – their work, preserved in the distinct collections of the participating centres, has captured moments in Vancouver’s cultural evolution, while at the same time often becoming a catalyst for societal change. The distinct curatorial focus of each centre makes each of these collections unique – it is these differences we hope to highlight and celebrate during Independent Archives Week. The project’s innovation comes from its approach to engagement, one that invites audiences in to our archives and encourages them to share and participate through hands-on immersive activities. The digital age has made us all into our personal ‘archivists’ and ‘curators’ - selecting and preserving photos, video & text that inspire and motivate us. Archives Week works to connect residents to a greater collective community/art heritage.
$10,000.00
2015

Health Arts Society

Health Arts Society Growth to Sustainability Project

Health Arts Society (HAS) provides professional music performances that contribute to the quality of life of people in care. The Society presents 45-minute concerts of one to four performers, generally in series of ten a year, as "Concerts in Care." The hallmark of these concerts is the exceptionally high quality of performance. The value of the concerts is in the pleasure and enrichment they bring to audiences – people in care are as important an audience to serve with first-class music making as any other. Health Arts Society is engaged in an innovative programme to achieve sustainability by 2018, the GROWTH TO SUSTAINABILITY PROJECT. Its two pillars are the raising of a fund of $500,000 and a gradual increase in the revenues developed from the long-term care and retirement homes participating in the programme which will, by then, cover the majority of operating expenses. The result will be that although the Society will continue to grow, and to enlarge its programmes through philanthropic contributions, it will always have a stable foundation. This unusual strength is vital at a time when philanthropic organisations and individual donations cannot each be expected to indefinitely maintain organisations.
$100,000.00
2015

Heiltsuk Tribal Council

Interactive Travelling Exhibition Sacred Vessels Project Ocean Going Canoes of the Pacific North

Through this project we will support and encourage cross cultural and public awareness about the history and culture of North West Coast maritime Indigenous nations. It will preserve and enhance our ocean going canoe maritime heritage by encouraging aboriginal communities and youth in particular to engage in Tribal Journeys We will share our stories about decolonization and the resurgence of ocean going canoe culture. What was old is new, communities working together for common good, affirming ancestral ties and customary practises. First Nations people and the general public will be served through this communication and public awareness project. We will share traditional native practises, values and world view that has sustained us through the millennia, this can inform sustainable development of natural resources not only for native communities but society as a whole. Our “Sacred Vessels project” plans to develop and create an interactive travelling exhibit that will share the history of the ocean going canoe and the story of its resurgence; where the story will be told by tribal journey participants and canoe families from along the BC coast. The interactive and engaging exhibit with authentic interviews, stories, and artifacts will captivate and inform a wide aboriginal and non-aboriginal audience. Many will benefit from the interactive experience, accompanying programs, offerings and discussions.Our goal is for it to tour most major BC museums and Aboriginal centres
$10,000.00
2015

Heritage BC

Climate Rehabilitation of Heritage Buildings

Our goal is to facilitate investments in the conservation of non residential heritage properties through measures that connect the retention of heritage values with green rehabilitation, improved energy affordability and protection from hazards related to climate change and other risks, such as earthquakes. Opportunities for climate change mitigation include green rehabilitation efforts to improve energy efficiency and smart fuel choices that would help to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, with the added value of reducing operational costs for property owners, building tenants, and developers. Opportunities for climate change adaptation through the protection of heritage property from existing and future potential environmental hazards range from resilience to extreme weather events to seismic upgrades. We are collaborating with RDH Building Engineering to develop proposals for various levels of gov't &provincial utilities to place incentive funds in the Heritage Legacy Fund.Heritage BC would distribute to churches, non profits, museums, first nations,etc for energy efficiency upgrades of heritage buildings. RDH will assist in providing program design recommendations to advance the sustainability and durability of heritage properties through the Heritage Legacy Fund, in a manner that leverages other funding opportunities such as utility demand-side measures (DSM) through BC Hydro and FortisBC, emerging funding opportunities in carbon offsets and local government incentives.
$5,385.00
2015

Hope Action Values Ethics Culinary Training Society

HAVE ITA Accreditation: Professional Cook Level 1 Course

HAVE is expanding our 8 week culinary training program to offer an additional accredited 21 week culinary program for participating students to receive their Professional Cook Level 1 Certification recognized by The Industry Training Authority (ITA). The Professional Cook Level 1 program is the first level towards becoming a Red Seal certified chef and can cost upwards of $3,300.00 per person for a 32 week program at a postsecondary institution. HAVE plans to offer inclusive and accessible ITA accredited training at no cost to our students. This program includes classroom lessons and testing, beyond the regular 8 week program. For our students that wish to further their culinary training we work quite hard to either help them access funding for post secondary school or place them with an employer that offers an in-house apprenticeship program. Both of these options are typically difficult to come by and do not include the ongoing support many of our students need, be it due to recovering from addiction, PTSD, or mental health. Our goal with this program is to create opportunities, foster inclusiveness and acceptance, and bring about change for those who are most in need. What has made itself very clear to us over the years is that when people are given the opportunity to succeed, they do. Individuals that lack basic needs when applying for work such as no fixed address, no phone, and no ID, are often excluded from mainstream society.
$41,000.00
2015

Il Centro

East Van Green

Over the past year Il Centro has developed several new "food system initiatives", specifically an Italian Market (Farmers' Market), a new Community Garden and an active food security education program in partnership with Fresh Roots Urban Farm and Slow Food Vancouver. The East Van Green initiative will build upon, and connect our existing food system activities through a "zero waste" project that will utilize a state of art food "composter" and turn our organic waste into compost which in turn will be used for our community garden and Fresh Root's urban farm located at Vancouver Technical High School-across the street from il Centro. In partnership with a local recycling company (Recycling Alternative) we will establish a closed loop demonstration project that will take organic waste from our garden, catering facilities, restaurant, and the urban farm, (located at Vancouver Technical High School), and turn it into compost for local usage. By linking our community garden, catering/food services, farmers' market, and our partner's local urban farm we hope to create a food system demonstration hub that will engage, educate and promote urban sustainability, local food production, access to local food, and organic waste management. The zero waste project will, we believe, create a micro-community demonstration model that can be replicated and utilized across the city.
$90,000.00
2015

Inclusion BC

Help! Teeth Hurt: Creating a Business Case for a Pilot Project Special Needs Dental Clinic

The Faculty of Dentistry is currently seeking approval for a deep sedation chair at the Faculty and has paid the fee for approval to the College of Dental Surgeons of BC. We hope to use that chair as a pilot project for a specialized dental clinic (Clinic) for adults with DDs. This innovative Clinic would treat adults with DDs and would be a training centre for students of dentistry, dental hygiene, and anesthesiology, to teach these students to treat adults with DDs. The specialized pilot Clinic would be near UBC hospital, which has an intensive care unit, to ensure utmost safety of patients. This pilot Clinic would provide safe anesthesia as well as training to enable dental professionals to treat adults with DDs in their private dental practices, whenever possible, after graduation. Use of the Clinic for treatment under GA would be less costly and more efficient than using hospital operating rooms and would reduce demand for scarce hospital operating room time. The goal of Help! Teeth Hurt! is to create a business case to confirm the health and economic benefits of using the GA Clinic as an example of best practice for dental care for adults with DDs in BC. The business case will be used by Government, dental and community philanthropists, and the disability community in BC, to help them consider establishing dental surgical GA clinics to enhance access to dental care for BC adults with DDs.
$10,000.00
2015

Instruments of Change

Greenhorn Community Music Project (GCMP)

The Greenhorn Community Music Project (GCMP) provides an accessible weekly after school music program where youth of all ages work with amateur and professional musicians to play music, gain performance skills, create new compositions, perform in the community and become familiar with the inner workings of a working band. The objectives of the GCMP are to: - support youth leadership in the arts - remove barriers for youth involvement in artistic expression - provide an inclusive community-oriented space for people of all ages, cultures and socio-economic status to engage in the arts - build intergenerational connections through transfer of skills between musicians of all ages Young people collaborate in the development and implementation of the music project through relationship building, decision-making, project design and mentorship. The GCMP aims to explore creative collaboration across disciplines, cultures, generations and skill levels while giving participants the tools and the confidence to more effectively work together. The GCMP fosters creative engagement by highlighting that the audience can become the performer at any time by joining rehearsals and performances. The music project will initiate a cascade effect within the community, with people passing on learned skills to others, who do the same and thereby empowering people to realize that they don’t need to be ‘qualified’ or ‘special’ to participate in the creation of their own culture.
$10,000.00
2015

Island Mountain Arts Society

Northern Exposure

Northern Exposure is a gathering in Wells, BC for rural presenters and organizers of arts and culture with panels, workshops, round tables, networking opportunities and artist showcases. Northern Exposure will draw together individuals, festivals, organizations and artists to share ideas and knowledge on arts presentation and event organization, and to foster growth and support networks in the north and central interior. The program will cover such topics as: Building Audiences, Marketing, Financial Sustainability, Cultural Tourism, Funding, Sponsorship and Community Partnerships. Facilitated by Inga Petri, author of the seminal CAPACOA Study, “The Value of Presenting,” producers and organizers will be invited to give presentations outlining their challenges and successes in developing their projects. Learning from the expertise in the room, participants will be encouraged to share their personal experiences in roundtable discussions focusing on specific issues of interest. There will be intensive workshops, including on Friday with an all day workshop on “Audience development: A roadmap to engaged audiences and vibrant communities” and then on Saturday and Sunday with workshops on Marketing, Cultural Tourism, Funding and Working with Sound.
$10,000.00
2015

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