Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

Puente Theatre Society

Lieutenant Nun

Puente Theatre is joining forces with SNAFU Theatre and Theatre SKAM to produce an exciting outdoor musical about gender diversity called Lieutenant Nun. Written by Vancouverite Elaine Avila, the play tells the true story of Catalina de Erauso, a 16th century Portuguese nun who escaped the convent, dressed as a man, and became famous as a ferocious conquistador under the name of Antonio. The play will be performed outdoors in September at Macaulay Point Park in Esquimalt. The production has been commissioned by Theatre SKAM as part of their SKAM Remixed 20th anniversary season. They have asked several local companies to mount classic SKAM plays, adding their own twists. Lieutenant Nun was a huge hit in 2003, but it portrayed the title character as a lesbian. Our own theory is that the historical figure was in fact transgendered. With this show, we hope to generate awareness and acceptance for transgendered people in our society. While exploring sensitive issues surrounding gender identity, it’s a rowdy adventure tale, with puppets, masks, and music, performed in a public area, which makes the subject matter accessible to a general audience. The play will serve the transgendered community, by portraying a transgendered person as a hero, and by creating awareness for issues in their lives that will foster tolerance amongst the broader population. The broader population will also be served, by increasing their capacities for understanding and acceptance of difference.
$10,000.00
2015

Raincoast Conservation Foundation

Creating a vision for salmon in the lower Fraser River

We will approach individuals, groups, First Nations, academics, business and municipalities who understand the landscape (ecologically and politically), and can identify the geographical and political focus required for the lower river and estuary to be a vibrant region that sustain salmon, people and local economies 30-50 years from now. Creating the document will bring disconnected groups together to share ideas and identify solutions to systemic issues including: Resources – Federal government budget and resource cuts to DFO have affected science, enforcement, habitat protection and knowledge transfer at all levels. First Nations, community groups and ENGOS are left to deal with this void. Authority – More progressive Fraser River co-coordinating bodies have been dissolved. In their place, agencies like Port Metro Vancouver now drive political and economic agendas. With legislation weakened, governing bodies removed and replaced, and policy mandates like Wild Salmon Policy unimplemented, serious losses to salmon habitat are occurring. Community groups, First Nations and municipalities cannot respond adequately. Fragmentation – There is no broad coordination around conservation planning in the lower Fraser and regional collaboration is required. Beliefs –There is a mind set that environmental protection is a choice between the economy and the environment. The opportunity to envision Salmon in the Fraser in 2050 is not yet realised.
$10,000.00
2015

RAVEN (RESPECTING ABORIGINAL VALUES AND ENVIRONMENTAL NEEDS)

Environmental Racism Education Development Project

At a recent strategic planning session, board and staff decided to move forward with the education element of our mission. With this development grant, we will explore ways to implement the second half of the mandate outlined in our Letters Patent “...to assist aboriginal peoples in protecting and restoring the natural environment for the benefit of all people within Canada by …developing and delivering education programs to advance knowledge and understanding of available legal rights and remedies.” The development project will consist of two steps: Step 1) Educate ourselves: train staff and board about the Canadian legal system regarding injunctions, judicial reviews, appeals court processes, etc; and learn from First Nations about their systems of ‘ancestral laws’; Step 2) Engage our First Nations partners in a collaborative learning process to outline a new education program that will help us meet our mandate, including: what information the curriculum needs to cover, how could the curriculum be most effectively delivered, does the proposed program meet CRA's criteria for "advancement of education". The Vancouver Foundation’s support will be used to fund Step 2. It will help move this project forward by providing funding for us to collaborate with our Indigenous partners and explore ways in which we can meet our mandate, and provide them with a service they can use to help advance their struggle for recognition of their indigenous rights and title in the courts.
$10,000.00
2015

Raven Spirit Dance Society

Salmon Girl

Raven Spirit Dance is in the creation period of a new dance/theatre work for young audiences. Salmon Girl explores the world of water and salmon. Through theatre, dance and shadow and live puppetry, Salmon Girl will share a First Nations perspective on the importance of salmon. At the helm of this collaboration is our Artistic Director Michelle Olson from the Tr’ondek Hwech’in First Nation (as choreographer) and Quelemia Sparrow from the Musquem First Nation (as playwright). These two artists bring together their respective cultural perspectives, stories and disciplines to create a piece that is both meaningful and delightful to young audiences. The social innovation in this work is the sharing of traditional First Nations knowledge with the broader community. The piece bridges Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal communities through audience attendance and advocates for environmental sustainability, a value that is deeply embedded in traditional First Nations stories.
$10,000.00
2015

Ray-Cam Co-operative Centre

OUR PLACE Graduation Strategy - Transitions from Elementary to Secondary School

OUR PLACE Graduation Strategy is a partnership of residents, community-based organizations, schools and service providers working collaboratively to support the growth, education and healthy development of children in Vancouver’s inner city. The Graduation Strategy is a comprehensive place-based initiative designed to improve graduation rates for inner city children. The school-based programs are based at secondary school, elementary level and adult education. Comprehensive supports include: tutoring, peer support, mentorship, primary health care and assessments, family support, sports and recreation, counselling and advocacy. OUR PLACE Graduation Strategy builds from local experience research, assets and strengths in this community (DTES/Strathcona). OUR PLACE Graduation Strategy aims to engage students, parents, teachers’ and partners to ensure solutions through participation, seeing people as citizens able to contribute rather than clients to be serviced. We link to and work with influential champions to inform relevant public policy to ensure continuity and sustainability of these place-based responses. Working differently and moving towards a culture of collaboration and collective impact is a key goal of OUR PLACE Graduation Strategy. This specific project will address the gap for children 9 to 14 to ensure there are coordinated supports connecting schools, parents, children and youth and community organizations to work towards successful transitions in school.
$10,000.00
2015

Ready to Rent BC Association

Innovating to Prevent Homelessness

Innovating to Prevent Homelessness is an evidence-gathering initiative focused on adapting R2R’s ‘success based housing’ approach to increase housing stability, reduce evictions, support crisis-free moves and prevent homelessness within three pilot communities. Ready to Rent is a homelessness prevention models that is scalable and adaptable to meet the needs of many. Innovating to Prevent Homelessness will work with three communities new to the R2R model, and will gather data on demographics, beneficiary experience, impact on damages and evictions with their related costs, frequency of crisis-free moves and overall housing stability. 6 – 8 stakeholders identified by BC Housing, AHMA, and R2R will lead the initiative in partnering communities. A local organization will take the lead, and beneficiaries will be included in gathering baseline data, adaptation of course materials, and overall oversight of the initiative. Innovating to Prevent Homelessness will measure impact through before-and-after comparison data, as well as the development of skills, knowledge and confidence of participants. Activities will include: • gather baseline data • identify existing community supports • identify gaps in services • deliver professional development and train the trainer workshops • support an educational prevention approach in each community • measure the impact of the R2R model • collaborate on community-based prevention strategies, policies and systems
$10,000.00
2015

Building Capacity through Education

Building Capacity through Education will build upon the recent Peers for Housing Stability initiative. Though Peers, R2R developed a youth-specific course and trained youth facilitators to co-facilitate 20 RentReady sessions in the Lower Mainland. Emerging feedback from community partners has indicated a demand for capacity building to deliver the training in-house, both the youth-specific RentReady course as well as the broader, certificate-backed RentSmart course. In speaking to youth, R2R has also identified the need to develop tools that address roommate living situations, often a requirement for affordability but legally in the grey zone and a source of many issues and conflicts. Finally, there is a need for increased awareness and expansion of the Ready to Rent model amoung landlords and housing providers in the Lower Mainland. The goals for Building Capacity are as follows: - to train community organizations in the Lower Mainland to become RentSmart and RentReady facilitators and be able to deliver the curriculum to their youth populations - to increase awareness of the RentSmart certificate amoung landlords and housing providers - to pilot and implement RentSmart within the public, alternative and aboriginal school systems - to develop tools, resources and supports to assist youth to identify and navigate successful roommate living situations
$100,000.00
2015

Regional District of Central Kootenay

Kootenay Lake Shoreline Management Guidelines

The Kootenay Lake Partnership is producing shoreline management guidelines. Both the guidelines (captured in a document) and the process to arrive at them, are important components to changing how it is that shoreline impacts are managed, mitigated, or compensated for. The KLP has been working toward management guidelines for some time – ecological inventories, archaeological studies, GIS mapping etc. – and only recently has the KLP approached the shoreline management guidelines as the beginning, not the end. The development project is the completion (integration and production) and public outreach of the shoreline management guidelines. To do this now requires assembling the datasets from all the individual studies that were completed for the lake. Integrating these means creating an index of various parts of the shoreline using a 5 category system of very high to very low ‘overall’ value. This will form the basis of directing activities by decision makers. The production component will entail the visuals, text and mapping of the datasets in a coherent way. The process that is important here is assembling the ‘partners’ which are signatory to the KLP and creating a streamlined approach to service delivery, compliance and enforcement, legislative changes, and public outreach.
$10,000.00
2015

Ruby Slippers Production Society

Advance Theatre: New Works by Women

Ruby Slippers Theatre is launching a new social innovation project, a festival of staged readings, called Advance Theatre: New Works by Women. As a response to the underrepresentation of women in theatre, the Advance Theatre Festival will showcase dramatic readings of five new plays by Canadian women playwrights over five days during the Vancouver Fringe Festival in September 2015, and annually after that. Priority when curating the festival will be given to diversity of all kinds (age, cultural background, sexual orientation, physical ability). Ruby Slippers Theatre has a strong reputation for furthering the voices of women in theatre and this project seeks to provide greater exposure to Canadian women playwrights with the aim of increasing production opportunities. At this time, we are seeking Vancouver Foundation support to test and implement this initiative over the next three years, after which point we will have been able to evaluate the program's efficacy and ongoing financial viability.
$10,000.00
2015

Salal Foundation

Beyond Coal Canada

Beyond Coal Canada is a collaborative project to oppose the export of US thermal coal through Canadian ports aimed at averting accelerated climate change for the benefit of future generations and the natural world. Beyond Coal Canada is the Canadian partner in the Power Past Coal coalition that is opposing the transshipment and export of coal from Montana’s Powder River Basin. When Fraser Surrey Docks and Lafarge Quarries first proposed their coal transshipment project in 2012 most observers thought permits would be issued within months and predicted our odds of defeating the project were slim. Our primary goal was to delay approval and construction. Three years later, the proposal is stalled, with important permits in limbo, widespread municipal opposition, organized and grassroots opposition, and a number of lawsuits working their way through the courts. The changed political circumstances have opened up promising new paths to victory, as well as new options for building a foundation to prevent future coal export expansions.
$75,000.00
2015

School District #23 - Central Okanagan

Fascieux Creek and Habitat Restoration - Phase 2

The project entails daylighting and naturalizing Fascieux Creek for 3 reasons: to protect the Western Painted turtles nesting on school property (blue listed species); to provide almost 1000 students a year a natural, living “classroom” and to return the creek to its natural state. Phase 2, for which we are requesting funds, is to finish the last of a 2 phase project begun in 2014. This project was conceived in 2010 by students and parents who still sit on the planning committee because of their passion for education and environmental protection though their kids are grown. Community members joined who were drawn by subsequent students’ passion for wildlife protection. This project is a grass roots effort that will take 5 years to complete because of its scope and the fact that the students and Green Parent Committee had no power or authority to make decisions about land owned by the School District. And while the District supports the project, they can only provide in-kind help, no cash. This meant that a handful of community volunteers with no real decision making ability had to do everything necessary to forward this major project - all while working with but outside the confines of the school and School District. However, once complete, the students of KLO Middle School and Kelowna will have a creek with wetland, wildlife and habitats in their backyard where they can learn about environmental stewardship and how a small group of people really can bring about change.
$10,000.00
2015

School District #37 - Delta

HYPE - Healthy Youth Program for Everyone

Our HYPE project is intended to improve the Social Determinants of Health (SDI) by offering pre-teens and teens an opportunity to take an active leadership role in their community and offering innovative ways to engage the community’s young people. The HYPE program will offer teens the opportunity to participate in the following SDI areas: a) SDI - Social Support Networks, b) SDI – Education, c) SDI – Employment/Working Conditions, d) SDI – Personal Health Practices and coping Skills, e) SDI - Healthy Childhood Development The program is based on numerous best practices in Youth Community Development that has trained and nurtured youth to be active in their community to improve or make aware opportunities to improve Social Determinants of Health. The TEST is to develop the first ever-comprehensive Teen program in North Delta. Teens will improve the above SDI’s through their involvement in developing the and participating in the following Areas: 1. Teen arts, recreation & sport programs [Addresses SDI’s a), b) & d)]. 2. Leadership training, workshops and mentoring and practicum placements particularly in the form of Teens creating and leading community programs and services for children, pre-teens and youth. [Addresses SDI’s a), b), c), e)]. Teens will be supported in creating it all: including resource (assets mapping), funding acquisition, youth advisory councils, marketing and supervising of programs and events.
$10,000.00
2015

School District #39 - Vancouver

Cultivating the School Food System

Cultivating the School Food System is about empowering teachers and students in learning, growing and serving healthy food. When students have access to healthy, local, and delicious food, it is believed that that academic confidence will increase and discipline and behavioural issues decrease. , , Students learn better when they eat healthy food. We connect this work to the “Good Food” movement in Canada and the United States which focuses on food that is: healthy, green, fair, and affordable. , CSFS is a multifaceted, collaborative approach to enhance student learning, support teacher and staff innovation in teaching, and eating healthy, delicious, local food. It aims to shift attitudes and behaviours of students and support teachers and food providers to make systemic change in teaching practice and food provision. Programs support students across the VBE, focusing on vulnerable youth in E. and S. Vancouver, in Renfrew Collingwood, and Victoria-Fraserview, regions where youth food insecurity and poverty are prominent. CSFS addresses: Food Literacy: CSFS is transformative on-site learning for students. Creating opportunities for experiential and inquiry-based learning, it hosts training for educators; year-round field to fork programming for students, prepares youth with employment skills. Access: CSFS provides healthy, schoolyard farm grown food for the school community. It supports healthy school meal programs by facilitating an expert working group comprised of VBE staff, community partners, and FR to recommend and implement strategies for increasing food access. School Food System (SFS): CSFS inspires and supports schools to make large-scale shifts in purchasing, food service operations and student meal choices through a bundle of programs under the working title “BC Wednesdays.” This grant will support the teachers that want to do more. Already three schools have self-identified as wanting to participate in BC Wednesdays.
$150,000.00
2015

School District #63 - Saanich

Choosing a Path for the Future

Our innovative idea to find innovative ways to support the sense of belonging for our Indigenous students by increasing student and staff capacity regarding Indigenous ways of knowing and learning. Our hope is through education we will find reconciliation for all of our indigenous learners and their families which will improve the grade to grade transition of our students and ultimately have more students graduating from school and crossing the stage with "dignity, options, and purpose." By providing inservice, training and experiential opportunities for teachers to learn about Indigenous ways of knowing and learning through intergeneration learning and teacher we will help teachers to broaden their understanding of integrating culturally relevant and meaningful learning opportunities for Indigenous students while providing non-indigenous students with rich learning connected to the lands and history of their surroundings. Our primary focus and vision is to provide educators with the tools, knowledge, skills, and learning opportunities that will help them see that Indigenous Education is for everyone and together with their colleagues they will have the capacity to transform these systems through an increased cultural competency and practice.
$10,000.00
2015

School District #67 - Okanagan Skaha

Through a Different Lens

The focus of this project is on the regular classroom: making learning more engaging and relevant for all students – rather than removing students to other programs. We are attempting to remove some of the barriers to success that many of our vulnerable students face (eg., over reliance on reading and writing); create strength-based classrooms where students can use their strengths to learn in alternative ways (technology, filming, creating, building, comics, interviews); and provide rich, relevant and meaningful learning opportunities. We began with in-class innovations in teaching and learning and are now supporting cross curricular and “outside” the classroom experiences – in the environment, on the reserve, and in intergenerational settings. Our application for a grow grant is to reach more classrooms and go deeper in those that have already been involved. Our school district has consistently achieved an 80-85% Six Year Completion Rate. The 10-15% of students that do not graduate consist of students of Aboriginal ancestry, students with a behavioural designation, students who have had difficulty with literacy through their school careers, and issues such as anxiety, drugs, alcohol. The two biggest groups are students of Aboriginal ancestry and those with behavioural designations. We have students as young as grade 9 leaving school. The school district has some alternative schools, career education, and other support systems, which support many students.
$150,000.00
2015

SeaChange Marine Conservation Society

The Restoration of SNIDCEL Shores

SeaChange Marine Conservation Society will restore nearshore and marine habitats within Tod Inlet, an area of great significance to local Saanich First Nations and visitors from around the world. The site has been damaged by historical limestone mining activities and the dumping of waste products from the historical cement operation (now known as Butchart Gardens). The nearshore marine environment will not recover from these impacts unless the nearshore is replenished with suitable sediment and replanted with riparian vegetation. This will happen through the long-term engagement of groups and individuals in the local community. Community events and a restoration forum will disseminate lessons learned from this pilot throughout the Capital Regional District (CRD). This project will restore lost nearshore marine habitat due to historical industrial impacts as well as slow the effects of erosion from rising sea levels without constructing seawalls. First Nations have a stake in these projects, as many of their middens and archaeological sites are located on or near marine nearshores within the Inlet. If this beach nourishment project succeeds over time, it may help other communities restore damaged intertidal environments that are also affected by rising tides. Beach nourishment has not been piloted on small scales within the Capital Regional District (CRD).We intend to organize a community event to share the progress of all the restoration within the site and to share others' s
$9,000.00
2015

SFU - Centre for Dialogue

Expanding renewable energy in BC through Climate Action Plan 2.0

In May, the Government of British Columbia created a new climate leadership team to recommend policies that would help ensure it meets its legislated 2020 and 2050 greenhouse gas reduction targets. The team’s recommendations, due in December, will form the basis of what the government is calling its Climate Leadership Plan—a set of policies to be included in the 2016 budget. The province understands that new policy will be needed across the economy to achieve its targets; this newly opened policy window offers an excellent opportunity to boost clean and renewable energy development and deployment in the province. The province has been clear that it needs the public to ask for climate solutions now; this is key in that there has been little to no political space open for such a discussion over the past three years. We believe that an immediate, targeted communications and engagement effort can help ensure that the Climate Leadership Plan fully delivers on its potential. We intend to build the evidence base and communicate the benefits of a prosperous low-carbon provincial economy. We will do this by developing and amplifying economic arguments, insightful analyses, and good-news stories about the development and deployment of clean energy. We aim to develop a positive, engaged, and geographically diverse constituency to inspire and inform a suite of strong new climate policies. We will then convey this feedback to government via a series of briefings.
$55,000.00
2015

Shameless Hussy Productions Society

Love Bomb

shameless hussy productions will present the premiere production of Love Bomb written by Meghan Gardiner with music by Steven Charles. A flood of emotion sweeps through Justine's first performance in years, and all because of a guest who got the night wrong. Suddenly her music takes on a life of its own ... Love Bomb is a 90-minute play with original music that takes on the sex trafficking industry in Vancouver. Sensational stories about sex trafficking - unfortunately true - have been in the news in our city for a number of years, yet not a whisper has been tackled on the stage. And although most people think sex trafficking only involves women from overseas, according to a recent report from the Canadian Women’s Foundation, over 90% in Canada are actually from Canada. Based on research and stories we have been collecting over the past 2 years, shameless hussy's two female performers will dissect this topic in a personal, dramatic, relevant and entertaining format. We will premiere Love Bomb at the Firehall Arts Centre September 25 - October 10th for a 17 show run.
$9,000.00
2015

Shuswap Association for Community Living

Community Building Now

The Community Building Now project will engage people with and without disability to work together collaboratively to research and identify common issues and concerns related to building better communities that creates action resulting in positive social change and ongoing influence in Salmon Arm and area that benefits the community collectively. We plan to accomplish this through Participatory Action Research to bring together a diverse group of participants to research what they and other community members would like to see change in their community that will result in a better, stronger community. Participants will receive formal training about how to create and sustain ongoing collaborative relationships, effective means to build better, stronger communities and how to implement action planning to meet the needs of diverse communities. Participants in the project will develop their personal and collective capacities by working together with the exchange of mentorship to increase their personal capacities to effect ongoing change in their community and positive impact on the community as a whole. The project will create long lasting mutually beneficial social relationships; build essential community building skills and valuable roles & working partnerships that will sustain long term influence and a legacy of a community that embraces diversity and full civic engagement.
$10,000.00
2015

Sierra Club of British Columbia Foundation

From the Ground up: Empowering BC communities to protect coastal temperate rainforest

Forested watersheds on Vancouver Island and BC’s South Coast are being heavily logged with negative impacts to water quality and availability, wildlife habitat, carbon stores, local economies, and our collective resilience against climate change. Only approx. 8% of the forested area of Vancouver Island and 6% of the forested area of the South Coast are protected and most of the productive old-growth has been logged. Regulations requiring the forest industry to self-monitor are ineffective at maintaining ecosystem health. Community members have become increasingly disconnected from the state of the forests in their region due to a lack of information and options for meaningful input. One of the ways to convince provincial decision-makers to implement conservation policy solutions is when they are pressured to do so by a diverse network of citizens; and the public will only get involved when they understand the impacts of forest practices in their backyard. To this end, the social innovation we are testing is to empower communities with localized information on forest health, to motivate people to monitor logging impacts in their watersheds and build support for improved forest practices. Through localized maps, public events, strategic communications, and a ‘gumboots on the ground' strategy to get people out monitoring watersheds, we will raise public awareness of the importance of forest conservation for wildlife habitat, a diverse economy, carbon values, and clean water.
$100,000.00
2015

Society for Children and Youth of BC

My Life Through the Lens: A Youth Rights Photovoice Project

This project will recruit 20 youth transitioning from foster care in the Lower Mainland to participate in a project using the technique of photovoice. Youth will learn to express their stories and become agents for change in their communities. Youth who participated in an earlier version of this project will be consulted on the development of this workshop and youth guest speakers/facilitators will be asked to help with the workshops. Participants will learn about the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, metaphorical photography, leadership, grassroots social movements, communication, and social media. With ongoing support from the project coordinator, youth will take photos that represent issues related to their transition from care to adulthood and their rights, select their best photos, and create quotes that express the idea in the photo. Using their photos, youth will engage in their own public awareness campaign using social media and other methods. Youth will help organize a photo exhibit and gala event to which local decision makers will be invited so that youth will have another opportunity to have their voices heard. Following the event, youth will meet up to strategize on how they can move their public awareness campaigns forward. Additionally, SCY will document this experience, create a toolkit, hold workshops and participate in events for community and Fostering Change partners on how to do this type of youth engagement work for change in the future.
$20,000.00
2015

South Vancouver Family Place

Life as a Grandparent

South Vancouver Family Place (SVFP), South Vancouver Neighbourhood House (SVNH) & Marpole Oakridge Family Place (MOFP) propose to provide an innovative project that supports the collaboration of the 3 agencies in the development and facilitation of a project that supports and encourages the ability of immigrant grandparents, their families and their grandchildren in creating a healthy, caring and supportive environment. This project will be tailored to the specific needs of isolated immigrant grandparents and their young grandchildren ages 0 to 5 years. We will be testing the model of this unique 3 agency partnership, the different modules of programming and the resources developed. We will also test how to disseminate the information we collect. The orginal idea came out of an eight month pilot project with SVFP. We developed some tools, did some assessment and research and that is the foundation of this proposal. The 3 agencies then developed this project with the support of our networks early years group. South Vancouver has one of the largest populations of immigrant seniors, and young children in the City. Local statistics indicate that up to 60% of the caregivers in our community are immigrant grandparents. Many are isolated due to language and cultural issues, having to care for young grandchildren, health and finances to name a few.
$10,000.00
2015

SPARC BC Society

Moving Forward Together: A Strategy to End Homelessness in Metro Vancouver

Funding under the Federal Homelessness Partnering Strategy (HPS) no longer includes the critical capacity building work previously done by the Regional Steering Committee on Homelessness (RSCH). This proposal is submitted on behalf of the RSCH Plan Advisory Committee to identify potential partnerships and opportunities to continue to support and advance this critical work intended to: • Provide a focus for regional discussion and decisions around homelessness; • Provide a framework for the planning, coordination and the development of housing services and supports for people who are homeless or at risk of homelessness; • Reflect leading practices while at the same time provide an opportunity for RSCH partners and members to learn from each other; • Bring together key regional partners to build increased awareness and public support around issues related to homelessness; • Facilitate coordination as well as build and strengthen existing partnerships and relationships; • Leverage additional funding and resources to support the implementation of the key goals, objectives, strategies and actions set out in the updated Regional Homelessness Plan. SPARC BC will serve as the administrative host for the project and will provide research, facilitation and evaluation support to help facilitate on-going collaboration across municipal and regional leaders who care about this issue and who believe that through caring and collaborative action, we can end homelessness.
$10,000.00
2015

St. Leonard's Youth and Family Services

Youth Innovation Lab

The Youth Innovation Lab originated out of the need for mentorship and pre employment opportunities for youth in care. St Leonard's has served youth at risk and youth in care since 1967- through a variety of traditional and non traditional programs. Outdoor adventure programs, a horse resource for girls, gang prevention, a day school and of course our residential homes have historically provided high quality care for youth. Research indicates that the jobs of the future reside in the high tech industry. A majority of youth in care struggle to achieve the training and education that they need for future employment success. There are many reasons for this, including the lack of permanency in home life, education, etc. Through our partnerships with the school district, the MCFD, the high tech community and others, we are building an accessible coding school to mentor youth through training and internships opportunities. The project started last year with an evaluation conducted by McCreary. Year two will focus on youth in care recruitment, leadership development, curriculum design, internships and with the support of Vancity and SFU, the development of the CSR and learning community framework for our tech community partners. The long range business goal is to see the tech and broader community support the ongoing financing of the program.
$75,000.00
2015

Strawberry Isle Research Society

??aa?aas [Tla­-aas: meaning outdoors] Youth Stewardship

The project will include a beach cleanup, eelgrass mapping and monitoring, eelgrass diversity beach seine, and shellfish collection (mussels, clams, and crabs) intended for testing of contaminants. Each activity will involve an instructional clinic where the participants will learn the skill needed to carry out that aspect of the monitoring project, which will include scientific note taking, transect surveys, GPS mapping, and species identification. There will also be a take home sheet, which will feature the organisms involved in that day's activity with information on the organisms' life history, traditional uses, and its Nuu­chah­nulth, scientific, and common name. All of the information gathered will be made into a report booklet and housed within the new library at Opitsaht, as well as distributed to our project partners and sponsors.
$5,980.00
2015

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