Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

?aq'am

Youth Leadership Program

The program is aimed at promoting the health, well-being and resilience of Aboriginal children, youth, individuals and families. The programs goals are to: develop a sense of belonging, ownership and control in youth’s personal lives, their education and within their communities and families; Increase self esteem, self awareness, resiliency and sense of responsibility in order to function as mentally and emotionally well members of their communities and society in general. When youth are connected, they will be more likely to graduate. The aim is to build resilience and well-being of at-risk youth, and families through leadership training, mentorship, self esteem building, cultural connectedness, and educational workshops based on common social issues affecting youth today. The development process will include engaging stakeholders, students and their families in creating a program that fits well within the school system and can be sustained over time. This program must be youth directed to achieve buy in and be successful. Instruments of data collection will be created to gain input into what interests youth, how they would like to be involved and how educators and family can best support them. A training curriculum will be developed based on information collected and timelines for implementation of the program will be established. Near the end a core group of participants will be identified in order to carry the project to implementation.
$10,000.00
2016

Access to Media Education Society

Mentor Me at Indigenous Fashion Week (MMIFW)

Mentor Me (MM) at Indigenous Fashion Week (IFW) (MMIFW) will engage urban Aboriginal youth in care in traininga nd mentorships to empower their identities, community relationships, and employability skill development, through IFW's celebration of Indigenous pride in the creative regalia arts that story Indigenous identity in collective cultural meaning. IFW will gather 30 Indigenous-Canadian designers and artists for the first national showcase of these international clothing artists. The ongiong Mentor Me weekly group engages 15 young Indigenous women transitioning from care. MMIFW will recruit, engage, train and mentor 30 Indigenous youth-in-care in 4 urban and 2 rural training workshops, mentorships and employment. Indigenous youth, all systemically affected by the foster system will develop cultural identity, relationship, and employment skills. They be mentored with the IFW team and cultural advisory networks, and will be employed as presenters and producers at the event. Workshops after the event will gather the knowledge of these engaged youth to evaluate and design an enhanced Mentor Me program. MMIFW will create strong relationships between young people and their community members. Their experiential research into effective mentorship and skills development, focused through the creative art of IFW, will build community knowledge of how to support youth transitioning from care, activated in the MMIFW network.
$24,000.00
2016

Adoptive Families Association of British Columbia

Social Innovation Cohort: Adoption Expo

A grant towards participation in a development process to explore the concept of an Adoption Expo and assess the impact of such an event for ourselves and for our prospective partners. Following the development phase we will then have a clearer understanding of the logistics and the outcomes that can drive a decision to hold an Adoption Expo.
$7,500.00
2016

Permanency Project for At Risk Youth

For the first time, AFABC would like to host a 3-day family finding bootcamp for homeless youth, and former youth in care experiencing loneliness. Every child has a family/network, and they can be found. Family Finding Boot Camps are a three day immersion for up to 50 youth and former youth in care learning the philosophy, framework and skills of Family Finding practice. Participants work in small and medium sized teams, actually practicing Family Finding for youth currently homeless, at risk of becoming homeless, or are experiencing loneliness. We would invite lead practitioner Kevin Campbell to host. In his previous bootcamps across the USA participants have successfully completed the Discovery and initial Engagement steps of Family Finding. The goal for the teams by day three of the training is to have found relatives and other connections, identified family members with functional strengths, engaged two lead family members, and invited found adults to a Preparation and Planning Meeting to be held following the bootcamp. Participants leave the immersion experience having learned and practiced the skills of Family Finding, developed a sense of confidence in their use of the skills, and feel confident in their ability to develop a personal support network. Our focus at AFABC includes following up with youth to ensure they are supported as they connect. Partnership opportunities: Broadway Youth Centre, Covenant House, Aunt Leah's, Federation of BC Youth in Care.
$25,000.00
2016

Arts in Action Society

19th Birthday Party Exhibition Tour

To plan, facilate, and curate an exhibition tour of the 19th Birthday Party, an interactive media installation that serves as a central provocative agent for public dialogue and education surrounding issues relating to youth in government care. The tour will work with between 4 to 7 host organizations in municipalities across the lower mainland, including: Aunt Leah’s Society in New Westminster, Lu’Ma Native Housing Society in East Vancouver, and community organizations and partners in Surrey, Burnaby, North Vancouver and Abbotsford. Co-directors of Housing Matters Media Porject will work closely with partnering host organizations in each municipality to create an art engagement and/or social event that accompanies the installation to further encourage community dialogue.
$52,385.00
2016

We Are Everywhere

We Are Everywhere is a community engaged art project led by artists Corin Browne and Patti Fraser, advocate and project coordinator Violet Rose Pharoah and communication professionals to mentor a small group of youth with lived foster care experience to collaboratively create a high-quality book, featuring interviews, stories and photographs of community members from across the lower mainland who are former youth in care, exploring their daily lives and sharing what has helped them survive and thrive. The project will include a post-project evaluation process with research and planing for longterm distribution of the book, including the potential social enterprise development with youth participants The mainstream narrative associated with foster care is a negative, recycled story that speaks about the issue without the actual voice of those with lived experience. The foster care population carries the social stigma of “failure” and even those closest to them usually have very little expectations for their futures. While crucial to acknowledge the realities that individuals from foster care face, many are carving out lives defined by their own personal definition of success; quietly creating new narratives that defy the preconceived notions about life after foster care. These stories deserve the opportunity to be shared and have the potential to inspire youth aging out of the system, as well as shift the current perpetuated narrative.
$50,000.00
2016

Oh the Places You Should Know: A Squamish Place Names Curriculum

The “Oh the Places You Should Know” curriculum project aims to create a foundation for the development of learning materials to accompany the Sk_wx_wu´7mesh Place Names map that are tailored to the needs of individual School Districts situated on Sk_wx_wu´7mesh territory (Vancouver, Burnaby, North Vancouver, West Vancouver, Squamish, and Whistler). The project will include focus groups with teachers in order to understand their needs, collaboration with Sk_wx_wu´7mesh knowledge keepers to collect stories and information to be used in the materials, and the creation of sample materials to be piloted in select School Districts. These materials have the potential to change how those living on Sk_wx_wu´7mesh territory understand and interact with Sk_wx_wu´7mesh peoples and places. By using these materials, students and teachers can begin to break down the cycle of racism that our education system has historically perpetuated. Awareness is the first step towards change. The materials will afford a deeper understanding of the culture and current issues of the Sk_wx_wu´7mesh peoples, and a greater appreciation of the natural history of the places students and teachers visit every day. With support from Vancouver Foundation, we will be able to develop test materials to pilot in several schools, and gather the feedback required to create inspiring curriculum kits that will change how those on Sk_wx_wu´7mesh territory learn about Sk_wx_wu´7mesh histories and peoples.
$10,000.00
2016

Association of Neighbourhood Houses of British Columbia

An Arts Hub for South Surrey: Engaging Community Through the Arts

The Media Room is a recently refurbished, fully accessible,1800 square foot space located in a heritage building at Camp Alexandra. Our vision is to re-purpose this space by providing equipment and resources to transform it into a venue for arts collaboration, creation, and presentation. This would include audio/visual equipment, display stands, drop sheets, drawing tables, and easels; as well as providing supplies in our crafts room for use by children and youth. Working with the artists and networks with whom we have established relationships, we will populate this space with artists committed to collaborating on projects aimed at social transformation. In keeping with our commitment to hearing the voices of those affected by oppression and marginalization; initially, there will be a specific focus on attracting artists who identify as newcomer Canadians and LGTBQ elders and youth - populations who have self- identified as needing support in our growing and changing community. The collaborative projects created through this facilitation would be presented under the auspices of Alex House. Our intention would be to work with the artists to organize and promote public events, connecting them to a larger engagement strategy. Rather than be an end-in-itself, Alex House would subsequently follow-up by supporting participant-led programs and activities aimed at creating change around the issue highlighted by the performance or installation.
$10,000.00
2016

Sharing Homes and Lives; Aging, Affordability, and Happiness

Our project involves: 1. Convening seniors and their families, young people and youth leaving care, and other potential stakeholders, in order to understand their very diverse contexts and to begin (a) articulating a value-base and vision that will ground how shared lives models are to be conceived and supported, (b) imagining and co-designing variants to life-sharing models that would fit individual's own, diverse circumstances, (c) beta-testing things like risk-sharing agreements, matchmaking/meetup formats and events, new screening and monitoring frameworks, and so on. 2. Investigating match-making services and algorithms to prototype more effective matching tools than conventional application and assessment processes 3. Designing the right infrastructure/container that will support these activities, including the roles, policies, practices and technology components. 4. Investigating the power of peer-to-peer models like Air BnB and Uber in order to see how these sorts of emerging solutions might apply or be adapted to our context, Through these sorts of activities, we (1) change the ownership of the model and begin to build participation in a movement (2) create an opportunity to build a new discourse around risk that we jointly share and mitigate, (3) create diverse solutions and models; (4) establish policy and infrastructure AFTER we know what works, versus services patterned after existing policies and system cultures.
$131,000.00
2016

Aunt Leah's Independent Lifeskills Society

Thresholds Program: Interrupting the Intergenerational Cycle of Foster Care

Thresholds Program provides supported housing for pregnant and parenting moms who, due to homelessness, are at risk of losing child custody. Moms live in a warm, home-like and supported environment during their stay, moving to supported independent housing when ready. Priority is given to moms who have a history of being in foster care. Youth from care are at heightened risk of early pregnancy and loss of child custody to the child welfare system. In BC, no collated record is kept on the number of youth-in-care who experience pregnancy. The best data on this issue comes from McCreary's work, ‘Fostering Potential’ (2008). The "report is based on the responses of almost 1,000 young people in Grades 7 through 12 who had been in care" and finds "among [foster] youth who ever had sex, 19% reported having been pregnant or caused a pregnancy, with a further 6% not sure if they had". Aunt Leah's 28-year history of working with young people transitioning from foster care corroborates this data; for example, of the 164 former foster youth that Aunt Leah’s worked with last year, 28 (17%) have dependents of their own – representing an additional 39 babies and children that receive Aunt Leah’s support. Thresholds works preventatively at the ‘entry’ point of the foster care system by giving pregnant & parenting young women from care the skills and resources they need in order to become successful parents, thus barring a new generation of children from entry into foster care.
$67,500.00
2016

Be the Change Earth Alliance Society

Greenest School Lab

The Lab is a proposal to convene a multi-stakeholder coalition that will guide participants in addressing the personal, social, and environmental conditions necessary for creating a model ecological culture in a school. By engaging the knowledge, shared values, and professional resources of stakeholders BTCEA will be informed and positioned to ensure that this initiative delivers: 1. An impact-driven coalition of stakeholders who will come together at various stages of collaboration to share their knowledge, experience, and concepts. 2. A deliberative and dynamic process developed around shared values that will effectively surface innovative ideas and prototypes for building a model school necessary for a sustainable future. 3. A knowledge-rich network of relationships that will sustain the process for surfacing innovative ideas for school-based initiatives to be prototyped and piloted in a school in the Vancouver and Surrey districts. To bring the greenest school into reality, BTCEA will identify the different users of a greenest school, determine what design interventions they can create together, and deliver a prototype that they can test together. Stakeholders will share ideas and insights, first individually and then collectively, on supporting systemic change as already advanced within provincial and municipal policy change to develop the greenest school model and work to align school-based social interactions with sustainability principles.
$10,000.00
2016

British Columbia's Women's Hospital and Health Centre Foundation

Changing Perceptions: Reimagining Sexual Assault to Better Support Survivors

In BC (2014) there were ~70,000 self-reported incidents of sexual assault (SA). In contrast only 2,341 SA were reported to police in the same year. Victim-blaming contributes to a culture where SA survivors’ credibility is undermined, evidenced by a reluctance to disclose or report to authorities. Low conviction rates and well-publicized SA case rulings reinforce public perceptions that minimize the severity of SA. Systemic re-victimization compounds survivors’ trauma and creates barriers that reduce willingness to disclose and access support services. Never has public awareness about SA in Canada been so high, creating an opportunity for changes in both public attitude and policy. The social innovation this research project will explore is how to stimulate a shift in the public discourse around SA toward less victim-blaming and more trauma-informed responses across multiple systems (health, justice and education). BCW and EVA BC will work with survivors, community-based organizations, and SA response systems, to investigate how power holders influence public perceptions of SA and how public perceptions of SA influence survivors’ willingness to disclose and access support. Knowledge generated from this project will facilitate safer environments for survivors to disclose and access support services and improve trauma-informed responses to SA across multiple sectors in BC.
$224,553.00
2016

Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society

Redefining Get Outside BC (RGOBC)

RGOBC will change the way we act, what we believe and potentially the resources that flow to youth-centered programing. First, CPAWS-BC will accept that our current model of hosting a single summit in the Lower Mainland as the primary tool for youth engagement and leadership training is flawed. Instead, with the Vancouver Foundation’s support, we will host a four-day youth summit in Central Vancouver Island, the Okanagan, and the Kootenays, as well as focus and planning groups in various regions. To date, most youth programs are devised in Vancouver and implemented elsewhere. RGOBC will be devised and implemented locally, leaving space for the influence and sharing of ideas from other regions, ensuring a wider range of voices and experience are incorporated. Youth and a diverse group of educators, leaders and social innovators will collaborate in the program with the intention of critiquing, deconstructing and rebuilding the structure and approach. Youth will lead all aspects of the process. Non-youth participants, including potential corporate funders, will be engaged in the program, but will take guidance from youth throughout. It will help create “buy-in” for the concept and program, since adults will be part of the larger systemic change and will be asked to be a part of the long-term funding plan. The final program outcomes will be shared with the broader environmental community in an effort to change the wider movement. CPAWS-BC will demonstrate that change is possible
$9,000.00
2016

Get Outside BC 2017 – Fostering Change Edition

CPAWS-BC believes that in order to ensure conservation is a long-term priority, we need to equip the next generation of youth to feel safe exploring nature; to defend socially, culturally and biologically important spaces; and to lead their peers along a similar journey. We also need to ensure that all youth have these skills and experiences, and not just a privileged few. Get Outside BC (GOBC) is a longer term youth-led leadership program that supports young people gain the mental and physical health benefits of being in wilderness, while also being a leader in a larger social and environmental change movement. After speaking with young people and social service organizations, we learned that youth in care were craving the opportunities that GOBC offered but faced many barriers to participation. For example, some programs were prohibitively expensive for youth, or social service organizations didn’t have the capacity to start these programs on top of their regular programming. CPAWS-BC will work with youth in care, youth agencies and other experts to redesign GOBC specifically to meet the needs of youth in care. In doing so, we will amplify youth voice and engage young people and youth-serving orgs in creating a program formula that ensures full access and participation. Our longer-term goal is to demonstrate our outcomes for the larger community in order to make more inclusive and accessible spaces.
$25,000.00
2016

Canucks Autism Network Society

Adapted Sports and Rec Expansion in Kamloops and Nanaimo for Children Living with Autism

With 1 in 68 children identified as being on the autism spectrum, the need for adapted sports and recreation programs is growing. This project aims to increase our program reach throughout the province by expanding into new, under-served communities where we do not currently have programs (Nanaimo and Kamloops). Additionally this project strives to increase community capacity through the delivery of autism specific sport and recreation training for our partners, by including their staff in our programs so they can gain hands on autism specific sport delivery experience, and developing a train the trainer model so our partners have the skills and tools to support individuals with autism in their existing community programs. Through this three year approach, we will move from hands on program delivery of adapted sports and recreation programs, to community centre staff being trained to deliver recreation programs for people living with autism through partnered program delivery to finally overseeing integrated sports and recreation programs that take place within the community.
$138,000.00
2016

Carnegie Community Centre Association

Social Innovation Cohort: Our Community Vision for Mental Health

A grant to participate in a development process to explore ideas around utilizing the experiential knowledge of participants and includes two key components: community participatory research and a grassroots visioning process. Through the participatory research portion of the project we are seeking to contribute to a broadened understanding of the societal and social determinants of mental health, especially the issues and barriers specifically faced by low-income DTES resident with mental illness. This first phase has already started and we have been having regular weekly meetings to plan the research process. Building on research findings emerging from the first phase, our second objective is to co-create a shared community vision of mental health in the DTES. By engaging in practical community research and knowledge production, participants not only learn new skills but see themselves in a position of competence, as experts of their own health and wellbeing, while also obtaining valuable knowledge and information about the structures surrounding them. This approach will combine participation and knowledge to foster DTES residents confidence and leadership abilities to meaningfully participate in decision-making forums and processes, sustain broader community involvement, and work with related community groups to build consensus, strength and new relationships towards improving their own mental health as well as the wider health of their families and community.
$7,500.00
2016

Our Community Vision for Mental Health

The project is based on the recognition that housing is a primary and fundamental social determinant of mental health. It seeks to give low-income Downtown Eastside residents living with mental illness, trauma, and disability the power to contribute to—and seek knowledge about—their health by developing a new “residents first” approach to supportive housing provision and management. Their influence is integral to bettering social housing. We will facilitate spaces to draft and establish best practices and guidelines for meeting and decision-making. We observe an urgent need to work well in coalition, in good communication with other organizations, groups, networks, and services and we can contribute to their longevity. Part of our work will be to strengthen our community member's capacity to participate in decision-making structures. Through visual description, creative form, mapping, media we will address language barriers related to literacy and translation. We can influence the representation of our community. This work will advance our knowledge of supportive housing provision. Amplifying residents' voices and experience informed and grounded in the experience and needs of existing and future social housing residents. As a peer-led project, this plan will have at its core the fundamental belief that people living with mental illness, addictions, and poverty should be able to make basic decisions concerning the day-to-day activities in their lives and homes.
$10,000.00
2016

CCEDNet

Social Finance for Community Health and Well Being in British Columbia

Firstly we will compile a summary of existing research on impacts and models of place-based social finance in Canada and BC, and use that evidence to invite participation in and inform a "Learning Community" of practitioner and policy stakeholders in BC that will be convened over the lifetime of the project. Secondly we will support the implementation of two investment vehicles by the Vancouver Island Community Investment Cooperative that are currently in development. One is a Community Loan Fund in partnership with an Island based Credit Union that will invite contributions to a dedicated GIC the deposits in which will serve as collateral for loans to affordable rental housing, renewable energy, sustainable agriculture and fisheries, First Nations economic development, and other local owned ethical enterprises that create social benefits and community impacts. The other vehicle is a securities regulated investment fund that is RRSP eligible that will be implemented in partnership with a Securities Registered Investment Management Company to support the same types of community benefits. Thirdly we will evaluate both the social and economic impact of the funds and use that information to inform stakeholders and the Learning Community and assist with dialogue with the BC Government, the media, the finance sector, the Securities Commission, and municipalities on enabling public policy needed to help a place-based retail social financing to grow to scale in BC.
$225,000.00
2016

Christ Church Cathedral

Social Innovation Cohort: Transforming Food Outreach Programs

A grant to participate in a development process ito explore the connection between and amongst volunteers, participants, and outside supports, with the goal of re-designing our programs to increase connectivity and reduce social isolation. This will be achieved by: • Reviewing the Cathedral’s existing food outreach and its suitability for the homeless population in the downtown business district through - Consulting with existing participants to determine their own needs and reasons for participating in the Cathedral’s food outreach programs - Consulting with existing volunteers to determine their own needs and reasons for participating in the Cathedral’s food outreach programs - Consulting with other downtown churches and service providers to assess current services in the immediate area • Prototyping, workshopping and designing opportunities – with the assistance of volunteers and participants – new or re-envisioned program offerings that respond to the most clearly articulated needs - Surveying the Cathedral’s volunteer database to determine availability and willingness to serve in these ways - Developing and/or strengthening partnerships with other service providers and voluntary organizations in downtown Vancouver that will help respond to these needs - Identifying trained professionals who can assist with new initiatives as identified in project plan
$7,500.00
2016

The Maundy Cafe

Systemic change beyond the Cathedral relies on vulnerably sharing the lessons learned through our year-long program transformation process with faith-based organizations seeking a way to deepen community engagement. This project will catalyze systemic change by building on faith leaders’ recognition of social isolation as a major issue facing their communities and neighbourhood networks. By sharing our experiences we will encourage other organizations to take similar risks to address the bigger issues of loss of community and economic bifurcation. The project will create toolkits, training programs, and workshops that will help other faith-based organizations to transform the entire process of food preparing, serving, composting, and cleaning into the vehicle by which inclusion, participation and community resiliency can be strengthened. We will also influence systemic change through the provision of focused opportunities for study and practical hands-on learning. In collaboration with our partners including other non-profits and local businesses, we will host public keynote events focused on how others can address social isolation, as well as workshops and voluntary opportunities for enterprises looking to channel their corporate social responsibility.
$10,000.00
2016

CIVIX

CIVIX Education: Project B.C.

The project will foster a systemic commitment to Student Vote and civic engagement within the education system, and improve the instructional capacity of educators in lead up to the 2017 provincial election. CIVIX will strengthen relationships with education stakeholders and administrators through in-person meetings and strategic communications to increase the scope and impact of the program, and facilitate expanded outreach strategies and support networks of institutional entrepreneurs. CIVIX will coordinate Democracy Bootcamp(s) to train teachers to become ambassadors of democracy in their school community. This will result in more positive and widespread outcomes among students in the key areas associated with future voting, such as increasing political knowledge and interest, and fostering a sense of civic duty. Working towards improved teacher capacity and commitment not only generates better Student Vote results, but creates systemic change by instilling the importance of democratic engagement and contributing to greater civic education outcomes for years to come. Student Vote also has an impact beyond the classroom. A 2011 independent evaluation reported that the program fostered political dialogue at home and 20% of parents agreed that their child’s participation in Student Vote positively affected their decision to vote. Scaling Student Vote deep and out is expected to grow this broad outcome and increase political participation among older Canadians as well
$60,000.00
2016

Collingwood Neighbourhood House Society

Health and Safety Beyond the Margins: Scaling and Expanding the Living in Community Model

The project will apply LIC’s meta-framework to create coherent regional and provincial approaches to sex work to reduce the violence sex workers experience and create communities that are healthy and safe for everyone. We will build relationships with organizations who play key roles in supporting sex work health and safety across BC, including police, municipalities, nonprofits and health authorities. Using our successful Curriculum for Change training in addition to new multimedia tools, we will educate these stakeholders about the impacts of stigma and unpack the cultural constraints that keep barriers in place for sex workers. We will then build a provincial network of stakeholders that will identify best practices to increase sex work safety through policy level change and reduction of systemic bias against sex workers. This dialogue will lead to a 2017 provincial conference. This network will then take leadership in coordinating regional approaches and implementing best practices within their organizations and local communities. Scaling our work is critical because many of the systemic changes that are necessary do not rest at the organizational or local level but require consistent, collaborative and regional or provincial approaches. Scaling will also allow this work to ultimately be embedded in policy that is sustainable over time. Moreover, the marginalization of sex workers necessitates a cultural change where sex workers are seen as equal members of society.
$150,000.00
2016

Contemporary Art Gallery Society of British Columbia

BMFH Artist-in-Residence: Artists Collaborating in Community

CAG uses the BMFH as a studio to incubate socially-engaged participatory projects in Vancouver, programs strategically identified as missing in the cultural provision of the city. From this site we develop multi-year community-focused residency initiatives. Hosting up to twelve Canadian/international artists in collaboration with and as mentors to local groups, organizations and communities over a three year period, this hub connects with diverse audiences such as youth, families and the under-privileged. Each artist is invited to undertake research and outreach toward new production in consideration of resonant urban issues and local histories, often self-identified by community participants, generating platforms where art is a catalyst for local exchange and dialogue among a range of voices and perspectives. BMFH enables us to work with communities and artists sitting outside of conventional gallery contexts, representing, and encompassing a differing set of concerns, scale, timeframe and approach than typical exhibition making. Furthermore it challenges notions of the artist as auteur, instead considering community-based participation and social activism as a methodology for production, thus allowing artists to set a structure but audience determines content. This format of urban residency is unique to and innovative in Canada, institutionally not happening elsewhere. CAG proposes to develop this program through implementing a series of public projects through to mid-2019.
$60,000.00
2016

Cowichan Social Planning Society

Cultural Connections: Re-Building Our Villages

We will begin by connecting with the communities that have expressed interest and develop 3 year plans with them that will begin the process of creating direction and beginning to build capacity within their own communities based on their needs, their challenges and their strengths. Our first step once we go into a community is to meet with members of the First Nations territories, ask permission, guidance and level of involvement that they would like to see and at what stages of the process they would like to be involved and/or lead From there: Community Based Workshop Series Creating a Cultural Shift: Healing our past, planning for our future Process: Large Group Workshops: Our Shared History Small Group Reflection: Rebuilding the Village; From a New Perspective What have we learned, what would we like to do, build framework for moving forward. Our Facilitation Team addressed over 200 LGLA members in Parksville. Introducing one of the exercises, Lucy Thomas told participants that, “What we are asking you to do today is going to take you out of your comfort zone. As we move forward through this process of healing and work to change the nature of our relationships, there will be many times we will feel both challenged and uncomfortable -we must remember not to let our discomfort stop us from continuing to move.”Scaling this to other regions provides opportunity for FN people to be the leaders of the reconciliation process, changing the systems from within.
$150,000.00
2016

Crisis Intervention and Suicide Prevention Centre of British Columbia

Advancing Lifesaving Enhancements to the Follow-up of Suicidal Individuals

Suicide is an important public health issue where an average of 10 people die by suicide each day in Canada. As identified in The Cost of Injury in Canada, a study funded by the Public Health Agency of Canada (June 2015), in 2010 there were 510 deaths by suicide in BC alone. In the same year, suicide and self-harm also resulted in 4539 emergency visits and 2855 hospitalizations, resulting in indirect and direct costs totalling $410M within the province. While the human cost of pain, grief and suffering are intangible, the economic costs of suicide are tangible and have resulted in significant economic challenges to the healthcare system. With a comprehensive case-managed 24/7 continuum of community support, the research shows that many of the 500+ deaths in BC can be prevented. Many suicidal people often do not seek support due to stigma around suicide. Crisis line contact, with its 24/7 accessibility and safety to reach out, can increase engagement and establish trust and further help seeking. With the already established rapport, our extended follow up process will help suicidal clients to better manage their own safety; however, phone and online service may not be sufficient to meet clients’ needs and face to face services are often required. Currently, fragmented service delivery processes exist for suicidal individuals. We are researching the impact of a structured follow up process over a period of time to determine the impact on connectedness and continuity of care.
$10,000.00
2016

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