Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

?aq'am

Youth Leadership Program

The program is aimed at promoting the health, well-being and resilience of Aboriginal children, youth, individuals and families. The programs goals are to: develop a sense of belonging, ownership and control in youth’s personal lives, their education and within their communities and families; Increase self esteem, self awareness, resiliency and sense of responsibility in order to function as mentally and emotionally well members of their communities and society in general. When youth are connected, they will be more likely to graduate. The aim is to build resilience and well-being of at-risk youth, and families through leadership training, mentorship, self esteem building, cultural connectedness, and educational workshops based on common social issues affecting youth today. The development process will include engaging stakeholders, students and their families in creating a program that fits well within the school system and can be sustained over time. This program must be youth directed to achieve buy in and be successful. Instruments of data collection will be created to gain input into what interests youth, how they would like to be involved and how educators and family can best support them. A training curriculum will be developed based on information collected and timelines for implementation of the program will be established. Near the end a core group of participants will be identified in order to carry the project to implementation.
$10,000.00
2016

Arts in Action Society

Oh the Places You Should Know: A Squamish Place Names Curriculum

The “Oh the Places You Should Know” curriculum project aims to create a foundation for the development of learning materials to accompany the Sk_wx_wu´7mesh Place Names map that are tailored to the needs of individual School Districts situated on Sk_wx_wu´7mesh territory (Vancouver, Burnaby, North Vancouver, West Vancouver, Squamish, and Whistler). The project will include focus groups with teachers in order to understand their needs, collaboration with Sk_wx_wu´7mesh knowledge keepers to collect stories and information to be used in the materials, and the creation of sample materials to be piloted in select School Districts. These materials have the potential to change how those living on Sk_wx_wu´7mesh territory understand and interact with Sk_wx_wu´7mesh peoples and places. By using these materials, students and teachers can begin to break down the cycle of racism that our education system has historically perpetuated. Awareness is the first step towards change. The materials will afford a deeper understanding of the culture and current issues of the Sk_wx_wu´7mesh peoples, and a greater appreciation of the natural history of the places students and teachers visit every day. With support from Vancouver Foundation, we will be able to develop test materials to pilot in several schools, and gather the feedback required to create inspiring curriculum kits that will change how those on Sk_wx_wu´7mesh territory learn about Sk_wx_wu´7mesh histories and peoples.
$10,000.00
2016

Association of Neighbourhood Houses of British Columbia

An Arts Hub for South Surrey: Engaging Community Through the Arts

The Media Room is a recently refurbished, fully accessible,1800 square foot space located in a heritage building at Camp Alexandra. Our vision is to re-purpose this space by providing equipment and resources to transform it into a venue for arts collaboration, creation, and presentation. This would include audio/visual equipment, display stands, drop sheets, drawing tables, and easels; as well as providing supplies in our crafts room for use by children and youth. Working with the artists and networks with whom we have established relationships, we will populate this space with artists committed to collaborating on projects aimed at social transformation. In keeping with our commitment to hearing the voices of those affected by oppression and marginalization; initially, there will be a specific focus on attracting artists who identify as newcomer Canadians and LGTBQ elders and youth - populations who have self- identified as needing support in our growing and changing community. The collaborative projects created through this facilitation would be presented under the auspices of Alex House. Our intention would be to work with the artists to organize and promote public events, connecting them to a larger engagement strategy. Rather than be an end-in-itself, Alex House would subsequently follow-up by supporting participant-led programs and activities aimed at creating change around the issue highlighted by the performance or installation.
$10,000.00
2016

Be the Change Earth Alliance Society

Greenest School Lab

The Lab is a proposal to convene a multi-stakeholder coalition that will guide participants in addressing the personal, social, and environmental conditions necessary for creating a model ecological culture in a school. By engaging the knowledge, shared values, and professional resources of stakeholders BTCEA will be informed and positioned to ensure that this initiative delivers: 1. An impact-driven coalition of stakeholders who will come together at various stages of collaboration to share their knowledge, experience, and concepts. 2. A deliberative and dynamic process developed around shared values that will effectively surface innovative ideas and prototypes for building a model school necessary for a sustainable future. 3. A knowledge-rich network of relationships that will sustain the process for surfacing innovative ideas for school-based initiatives to be prototyped and piloted in a school in the Vancouver and Surrey districts. To bring the greenest school into reality, BTCEA will identify the different users of a greenest school, determine what design interventions they can create together, and deliver a prototype that they can test together. Stakeholders will share ideas and insights, first individually and then collectively, on supporting systemic change as already advanced within provincial and municipal policy change to develop the greenest school model and work to align school-based social interactions with sustainability principles.
$10,000.00
2016

Carnegie Community Centre Association

Our Community Vision for Mental Health

The project is based on the recognition that housing is a primary and fundamental social determinant of mental health. It seeks to give low-income Downtown Eastside residents living with mental illness, trauma, and disability the power to contribute to—and seek knowledge about—their health by developing a new “residents first” approach to supportive housing provision and management. Their influence is integral to bettering social housing. We will facilitate spaces to draft and establish best practices and guidelines for meeting and decision-making. We observe an urgent need to work well in coalition, in good communication with other organizations, groups, networks, and services and we can contribute to their longevity. Part of our work will be to strengthen our community member's capacity to participate in decision-making structures. Through visual description, creative form, mapping, media we will address language barriers related to literacy and translation. We can influence the representation of our community. This work will advance our knowledge of supportive housing provision. Amplifying residents' voices and experience informed and grounded in the experience and needs of existing and future social housing residents. As a peer-led project, this plan will have at its core the fundamental belief that people living with mental illness, addictions, and poverty should be able to make basic decisions concerning the day-to-day activities in their lives and homes.
$10,000.00
2016

Christ Church Cathedral

The Maundy Cafe

Systemic change beyond the Cathedral relies on vulnerably sharing the lessons learned through our year-long program transformation process with faith-based organizations seeking a way to deepen community engagement. This project will catalyze systemic change by building on faith leaders’ recognition of social isolation as a major issue facing their communities and neighbourhood networks. By sharing our experiences we will encourage other organizations to take similar risks to address the bigger issues of loss of community and economic bifurcation. The project will create toolkits, training programs, and workshops that will help other faith-based organizations to transform the entire process of food preparing, serving, composting, and cleaning into the vehicle by which inclusion, participation and community resiliency can be strengthened. We will also influence systemic change through the provision of focused opportunities for study and practical hands-on learning. In collaboration with our partners including other non-profits and local businesses, we will host public keynote events focused on how others can address social isolation, as well as workshops and voluntary opportunities for enterprises looking to channel their corporate social responsibility.
$10,000.00
2016

Crisis Intervention and Suicide Prevention Centre of British Columbia

Advancing Lifesaving Enhancements to the Follow-up of Suicidal Individuals

Suicide is an important public health issue where an average of 10 people die by suicide each day in Canada. As identified in The Cost of Injury in Canada, a study funded by the Public Health Agency of Canada (June 2015), in 2010 there were 510 deaths by suicide in BC alone. In the same year, suicide and self-harm also resulted in 4539 emergency visits and 2855 hospitalizations, resulting in indirect and direct costs totalling $410M within the province. While the human cost of pain, grief and suffering are intangible, the economic costs of suicide are tangible and have resulted in significant economic challenges to the healthcare system. With a comprehensive case-managed 24/7 continuum of community support, the research shows that many of the 500+ deaths in BC can be prevented. Many suicidal people often do not seek support due to stigma around suicide. Crisis line contact, with its 24/7 accessibility and safety to reach out, can increase engagement and establish trust and further help seeking. With the already established rapport, our extended follow up process will help suicidal clients to better manage their own safety; however, phone and online service may not be sufficient to meet clients’ needs and face to face services are often required. Currently, fragmented service delivery processes exist for suicidal individuals. We are researching the impact of a structured follow up process over a period of time to determine the impact on connectedness and continuity of care.
$10,000.00
2016

Il Centro

Cultural Exploration and Engagement (working title)

Il Centro has been actively been pursuing and developing the collaborative, co-presentation and partnership approach for the past two years, the results to date, have had a significant impact on our organization as we are now perceived by our professional partners and collaborators as a valid and credible cultural entity that can play a more proactive role in the broader cultural context in the City. At the same time, il Centro has engaged in several projects that have linked the professional arts world with our multicultural partners, demonstrating the value, and we believe, our hypothesis that connecting the two assets-culture and multiculturalism-both addresses the systemic challenges as well as creating new and exciting content for our evolving culture. Despite the positive organizational experience we feel that the engagement approach has not been developed into its full potential. While we have broached the concept in a discussion with the City Vancouver Cultural Affairs department we have recognized that we need to create a proof of concept or study that documents our hypothesis and measures the impact in both artistic outcomes as well as quantitative outputs. Working with our partners, Il Centro will track and gather data from the collaborative and partnership events that will test the concept and, we believe, allow us to begin to address the systemic issue through a documentation, dissemination and engagement outreach strategy and campaign.
$10,000.00
2016

Indian Summer Arts Society

Taiké: An Inter-Cultural Arts Development Project

There’s a Punjabi word for First Nations people that is only used in Vancouver. It doesn’t exist in India, or even in Toronto, Winnipeg or Calgary. The word is taiké and it was used when First Nations and South Asian men worked and lived together at lumber mills. Taiké translates to mean ‘father’s elder brother’. According to cultural researcher Naveen Girn, “It speaks to the idea of cousins between First Nations and South Asians, but also this idea of shared ancestry.” (Source: Vancouver Courier) The relationships that early South Asian immigrants were able to establish with Indigenous peoples has largely been lost and little is known of its history. What is evident though, is a shared sense of community, of storytelling traditions, and of respect for cultural inheritance. This project seeks to renew and re-build that respect and sense of kinship, through developing opportunities for First Nations and South Asian artists to work collaboratively on artistic projects, with the intention of eventually culminating in an outcome at Indian Summer Festival. Development funding from the Vancouver Foundation will enable us to offer South Asian and First Nations artists the opportunity to spend time together, begin exploring what their collaborations might look like and come up with viable project plans. We aim to create one or more projects to fit into Indian Summer Festival’s omnivorous, multi-disciplinary curatorial approach.
$10,000.00
2016

Justice For Girls

Young Women and Girls Advocacy and Education Center

JFG will bring together community stakeholders, and in particular young women with experience of marginalization and homelessness in Vancouver, to shape our response to these systemic educational barriers. This community dialogue and current needs assessment will be organized and facilitated by a Project Team comprised of a JFG Team Leader, a Youth Advocate and 3-5 Youth Mentors who have experience of marginalization. The Develop Grant will fund this development process: 1. Apr.:Build Project Team *Training on girl’s rights, advocacy and accompaniment, interviewing skills, facilitating focus groups, leadership skills, public speaking, researching/analyzing data, etc. 2. May-Oct.:Engage Community *Stakeholder Engagement-conduct outreach, interviews, focus groups with "first voice" young women; their families; frontline youth, anti-violence and anti-poverty workers; educational and health professionals; Youth/ Women's/Aboriginal organizations, etc. *Research-current reports and promising practices nationally/internationally *Public Awareness-share learning through speaking engagements, writing, media, blogs, website, etc. with the intention of influencing public understanding, as well as educational policies, programs and training 3. Nov.:Create Project Plan *With the collected body of knowledge, create an innovative and strategic project plan with the goal of transforming the way we support and educate marginalized girls 2017: Test *Implement project plan and test
$10,000.00
2016

Nanaimo Art Gallery

Three Questions for Nanaimo

Exploring themes that are integral to the identity of this community, "Black Diamond Dust" and "Silva" empowered residents to encounter contemporary art on their own terms. "Three Questions for Nanaimo" will build on this momentum and engagement involving more people and more points of view. The Gallery will scale deeper through sustained, long term dialogues with community stakeholders, partner organizations, and local thought leaders, growing a community that supports the gallery because the artworks and ideas it shares matter to them. Our project will launch with the question: "What Does it mean to Live on an Island," and will engage expertise from a range of constituents including members of Vancouver Island’s indigenous communities, marine biologists, ecologists, fishers, and academics, along with local, national, and international artists, creating an innovative and sustainable year long program of exhibitions, public events, and encounters. This model will also build our organizational capacity: we will hire a curatorial assistant and increase education staff hours. Through expanded field research and outreach, we will create opportunities to connect with specific partners, and work in more sustained long-term relationships. Years two and three will explore questions around communication and mobility. Each project will be based in the gallery, but extended through the region, and widely activated through digital and print platforms.
$10,000.00
2016

Network of Inner City Community Services Society

Power to the People(!): making a neighbourhood work for Chinese speaking Seniors

This project takes a different approach than has traditionally been taken in looking at the needs of Chinese-speaking seniors in our community, i.e.: not ‘what kind of special projects can we create to reach out to and support these seniors?’ but, rather, “given that the majority of these seniors are long-term members of the community, and that the majority of them are Canadian citizens, why have the public and private services that should be available to residents not been designed and developed in ways that meet the needs of this key community demographic?” 1. Addressing service fragmentation • Formalize Service Providers’ Network • Develop and update a bilingual service directory 2. Empowering Chinese seniors by creating a seniors’ advisory (SA), and ultimately a Seniors Hub Model. We will be using learning from the highly-successful ‘South Vancouver Seniors Hub” and, in particular, the toolkit developed by the Hub( Seniors Hub Toolkit) to assist other neighbourhoods in empowering and supporting seniors to directly impact the types of services and supports available to them. • Identify Chinese-speaking seniors who are leaders and volunteers in the neighbourhood. • Develop Chinese materials and conduct outreach to engage Chinese senior community • Conduct capacity-building activities to build seniors’ collective knowledge and voice • Work with SA to develop terms of reference and vision for council • Support SA members to utilize their personal networks
$10,000.00
2016

Pivot Foundation

Improving the Policing and Justice System Response to Marginalized Survivors of Sexual Assault in BC

Our goal in undertaking this project is to ensure that marginalized women reporting sexual violence do not experience discrimination and re-victimization when accessing police services. This project takes a two-pronged approach to social change. First, it will endeavour to address what we believe to be true by unpacking how beliefs about the credibility and reliability of certain girls and women impact equitable access to police and justice system response. Secondly, it seeks to change laws policies and rules by challenging formal laws and policies that perpetuate bias and undermine equitable access to police and the justice system. Pivot will determine whether litigation, or the threat thereof, is needed to force reform initiatives within both police and Crown Prosecution Services in order to create regulations that would assist in overcoming the stereotypes and prejudices, leading to better outcomes for women and more accountability for offenders. This development project will allow us to determine whether our campaign model can be applied to the issue of the police and justice system response to sexual assaults. Specifically, we will work with referring organizations and women survivors who have shared their stories to identify which behaviours, policies and practices limit access to justice for victims and accountability for offenders.
$10,000.00
2016

PORT ALBERNI SHELTER SOCIETY

Port Alberni Shelter Farm and Training Center

The Shelter Farm and Training Center will directly address issues of health, poverty and food security by growing vegetables and distributing the harvest to those most in need and by also supporting the development of a return to agriculture in the Alberni Valley by providing training and jobs for youth in the community and creating an internship program for aspiring young farmers, with a focus on those who currently experience poverty. By investing our energy into the long term goal of creating a self-sufficient and food secure community, we are confident that we can help reverse the effects that poor health is having on our community and the ways in which it is passed on from generation to generation in an endless cycle. To resolve the issue of food deserts in our community, we will look to offer delivery of food boxes to those who do not benefit from owning their own transportation means. The outcomes will be: - Increased local food for those dealing with financial challenges - More young farmers growing organic food in the community - Enhanced awareness of the benefits of eating healthy - Stewards of sustainable small-scale farming business models - Education farm open to schools and the greater community
$10,000.00
2016

posAbilities Association of British Columbia

Mobilizing the Arts to Catalyze a Movement

For the next year (2016), we will work with a broad-base set of arts-based and non-arts based partners to host meet-ups, events and activations that begin to map and network the landscape of people, projects and associations that are trying to engender citizen engagement, as well as social connection, inclusion and resiliency. This work will culminate in a festival in May/June 2017 wherein we will partner with the Spur Festival to host a public and accessible festival with the theme of (presently) “Alone Together.” The Festival brings thought leaders, artists and the public together to reflect on this topic. Publicly accessible art is already an integral feature of the festival—spoken word, dance, music, etc. However, we will expand the arts component so that there are many activations occurring throughout the city while also focusing them all on a call to action that inspires audiences to make the shift from spectators into participants. We will (1) mobilize and network many artists from diverse backgrounds, (2) deploy a broad range of interactive medium and modalities, and (3) optimize exposure (public places, buzz, etc.). Insofar as inclusive community is one where everyone belongs, it will be essential that the artists are representative of the broad constituency of community: aboriginal artists, children and youth, persons with disabilities, etc. Bursaries will be made available to arts groups and they will be provided ongoing project support, as needed.
$10,000.00
2016

REACH Centre Association

Population-based, citizen engaged-primary health care

Our project is working toward the broad outcome of empowering individuals to enjoy levels of health and well being achievable by addressing social determinants. Through building a case for non-profit health care organizations to access population based funding (capitation), we hope to effect a policy change in the funding of primary health care to provide a broader range of health care to community, allowing a variety of health services to be offered from the same pool of funds. This will make health care more accessible to community, especially to those of us with complex health needs. We plan to form a coalition of health care organizations to provide a comprehensive care network, and will work to promote a change in beliefs of a social system that physician-led primary care is the only option. This may lead to a change in basic routines as well: as public perceptions change and clinics offer alternatives to physician care, patients may seek to fulfill their primary health care needs from a variety of care practitioners. REACH community health clinic is well placed to convene and test this alternative because we have delivered primary health care in a non profit community governed model for over 40 years. We are strategically placed in the community, we have a history, we are a member of the CHC Association, and we have created partnerships with other allied health care organizations over the years.
$10,000.00
2016

Richmond Food Bank Society

Eliminating Barriers to Participation for People Experiencing Poverty

Monthly: Hold Steering Committee meetings made up of PRC coalition members, to provide community oversight to project activities Month 1: Meet with local community services staff to engage these agencies and their clients in the project Month 2: Advertise, receive, select and orient participants and other individuals experiencing poverty for conversation circles, Committee of Peers (CoP) and self-advocacy network (SAN) Month 3: Train facilitators and develop questions for conversation circles Month 4: Conduct conversation circles with service agency staff/volunteers Month 5-6 Conduct conversation circles with low-income individuals; interview and select rest of CoP Month 7-8: Examine and collate information gathered to determine gaps, systemic barriers, solutions, etc. Month 8-10 Convene CoP and SAN to build advocacy toolkit ideas such as: skills workshops, advocacy and leadership training, public speaking, book of stories, video Month 10-12 Seek opportunities with local faith groups, service clubs, municipal government for self-advocates to tell their stories Quarterly: Meet with CoP to gain insight on how to guide and amend the project Quarterly: Develop, publish and distribute newsletter with articles on project milestones, personal stories and interviews September 2017: Host a Community Forum on Barriers to Participation and Ideas for Change. Celebrate the project with participants and volunteers Month 12: Complete final report for VF
$10,000.00
2016

School District #59 - Peace River South

Adult Dogwood - Credentialing Adult Learners' Life Experiences

Adult learners, even those with literacy barriers, have accumulated a vast array of skills and knowledge through their life experiences. By interviewing and collecting tangible evidence of this knowledge and experience, DCLS will submit these to School District #59 so that educational outcomes can be proven to have been met. This process identifies and values the knowledge and experience of adults, and challenges the existing educational system wherein learners are given knowledge by instruction. This approach simultaneously respects the economic and educational system of structured required learning outcomes by helping adult learners choose which method suits them the best to demonstrate competency. By using the learners past life experiences combined with adult learner-centered distance learning at their own pace and at their preferred learning location, students will successfully complete their Adult Dogwood more quickly which will provide them with the pre-requisites to enroll in Post- Secondary education to further their education desires, or have the opportunity to apply for higher paying jobs that require a grade 12 education. SD59 and DCLS want to formalize an intake process as well as create course content that will be more appropriate for adult learners.
$10,000.00
2016

School District #6 - Rocky Mountain

Kootenay-Boundary Environmental Education (KBEE) Collaborative Initiative

This social innovation project will allow for all participants in the school system - students, teachers, administrators, parents and the broader community - to work together to develop and implement a region-wide plan. This social innovation project will influence this social system in the following ways: 1) Changing how we act and what we do as a learning community by influencing the culture to move place-based experiential learning from the margins to the mainstream. 2) Improving the flow of resources by identifying opportunities for effective collaboration across the region. 3) Enabling both teachers and students to be part of the planning and decision making process, thus increasing their empowerment, engagement and ultimately their learning experience. Citizens of the 21st Century need the skills and knowledge to be able to affect positive change. With increasing environmental pressures, the need for empowering both teachers and students is more important than ever. Intentionally connecting the districts, schools, and teachers of the region through environmental education (EE) and providing common awareness, access to professional development, resources, and opportunities will enhance the experience and learning of all of our students. The implementation of KBEE outcome-based plan will both offer educators opportunities to develop professionally, and prepare young people to transition through and out of the education system.
$10,000.00
2016

School District #63 - Saanich

Building relationships between youth and elders to begin reconciliation at Stelly's Secondary.

1. Invite district personnel and our Indigenous Cultural Leadership student group to engage local elders and a professional artist from each band, Tsartlip, Pauquachin, Tseycum and Tsawout with the Learning Commons area. 2. Working with elders, students and teachers, the artists will identify areas of the new curriculum that resonate with them as artists and as members of the local communities. 3. Artists will brainstorm with students and create project ideas to present to staff and students. 4. Working with the art teachers, shop teachers, First Nations support staff, and cultural staff, the artists will create work plans to include student collaboration and help. We envision students painting or carving along side the artists, talking, relating, and connecting. We envision local elders and community members participating through joining in the conversation and also by popping in to see the progress on the murals etc. 5. As local stories and legends, important physical land features or historical events become alive on the walls of the Learning Commons, not only will students be engaged with the space, but also a sense of ownership, pride and belonging will be developed. 6. Importantly, creating connections between elders who suffered through the residential school experience, demonstrating to the community that school is a place where all students can belong and feel welcome, will help to heal hurts and begin a process of reconciliation in our community.
$10,000.00
2016

Shuswap Association for Community Living

Community Building Now!

The Community Building Now project will engage people with and without disability to work together to research and identify civic issues that can be addressed to build a better community through action influencing positive civic change in Salmon Arm and area. We plan to accomplish this with Participatory Action Research bringing together a diverse group of participants to co-research what they and other community members would like to see change in their community to better meet the needs of a broad community. The project team will work collaboratively to develop methodologies to survey the community of Salmon Arm utilizing Photovoice, written surveys and interviews to gather data related to community development possibilities and analyze the results to develop actions to promote change to support the needs of a diverse community. Participants in the project will develop their personal and collective capacities by working together exchanging mentorship to increase personal capacities to effect ongoing change in their community that positively impacts the quality of life in our community. The project will create long lasting mutually beneficial social relationships; build essential community building skills and valuable roles & working partnerships that include people with intellectual & other disabilities sustaining long term, ongoing influence leaving a legacy of an inclusive community that embraces diversity, quality of life and full civic engagement for all citizen
$10,000.00
2016

Society for Affordable Housing Education, Awareness and Development

2017 Homeless Count

The Regional Steering Committee on Homelessness (RSCH) has conducted a regional homeless count every three years since 2002. In 2014, the last regional count, a total of 2,777 homeless people were counted in Metro Vancouver. 410 homeless children and youth were counted, representing 20% of the total individuals who responded to the age question. This included 88 children who were accompanied by a parent and under 19. The actual number of youth who are homeless - or who need help and services to end and prevent homelessness - is assumed to be much higher. With regards to youth, the project's goal is to provide a more accurate assessment of the number and demographic profile of homeless youth in Metro Vancouver. Our objectives are to: 1. Engage all youth-serving agencies across the lower mainland to participate in the Homeless Count to ensure that all youth are able to ‘count themselves in’ and answer the survey questions 2. Update existing information about homeless youth in Metro Vancouver: the number, demographic profile and trends since 2002. The gathered information provides organizations and communities with the evidence-base for attaining resources to be better able to undertake meaningful youth engagement and service delivery. Reflecting on past experiences we have decided to focus all our efforts on the core function of 'counting youth' through a robust youth strategy that is focused on agencies serving youth.
$20,000.00
2016

Society for Canadian Women in Science and Technology

SCWIST – MS infinity Program (M+S = Math and Science, an infinity of choices)

Scaling the MS infinity program has the potential to change girls’ attitudes toward science, and their beliefs that there is a place for women in STEM fields. The scaling of this social innovation will start with our core programs (Program Component I). Our core programs are expanding to rural/remote communities and Aboriginal populations and therefore more girls can be reached. For Program Component II, partnered with Science World, SCWIST hosts the popular annual “Wonder Women” networking event where university age participants hear what led the Wonder Women to their STEM careers. SCWIST will hold focus groups with the MS infinity cohort to assess their needs and interests. Based on those results, the Wonder Women event will be adapted for high school. We foresee that the demand will be on access to educational/training programs; scholarships; volunteering, work experience; and resume development – resources that girls desperately need to be successful in STEM education and careers. Finally, through mentorship with women in STEM, these attitudes will be reinforced. SCWIST’s new MakePossible Mentorship Network is an on-line software platform designed to create a community that supports women in STEM. As young women emerge from high school and transition into higher education, a support network will be essential. We will grow the MakePossible network so that connections with the whole pool of MakePossible mentors will become available (Program Component III).
$10,000.00
2016

Society Promoting Environmental Conservation (SPEC)

Climate Adaptation for Small-Scale Producers

Working with our partner organizations we will facilitate a series of workshops/tours, create extension material and create a demonstration site that focuses on priority issues (identified by farmers themselves) which consider future growing conditions as they relate to climate change. To add rigor to the workshops/tours and extension information, there will be a component of community-based research that combines academic resources with hands-on demonstration, for example: improved water monitoring/utilization techniques for multiple soil types, site specific soil quality indicators, hedgerow demonstrations, or integrated pest management. This program will explore ways in which farmers within a particular locale, who share similar site-specific challenges, can identify shared concerns and access expert help/research in addition to providing and sharing their own knowledge and advice. This community-based learning, enhanced by expert knowledge and real-world demonstrations, can provide information that is site specific, current, adaptable to changing conditions and, most importantly, shareable. In this way, farmers can access better information without huge costs and augment the collective knowledge base of farmers in their area. This project will support farmers where there is an identified need, in their efforts of responding to water, soil/nutrient and/or pest problems and will improve and increase food production in BC.
$20,000.00
2016

The Kalein Hospice Centre Society

Kalein Centre Liminal Leadership/Learning Lab

The Kalein Centre will promote social innovation through the creation of a Liminal Leadership Lab. The Lab will convene a broad range of cross-sectoral, multi-disciplinary thought leadership from across BC, in the form of health care professionals, allied health services, social sector and community agencies, patients, their families and other community voices. Through dialogues, workshops and seminars, the Lab will explore, develop and test new community-based approaches that can innovate, influence and elevate the ways in which end of life care is delivered and is accessible. In so doing, the Lab will become a generator of opportunities to enhance the quality of experience for both patient and caregiver. This interdisciplinary approach will shift perspectives and approaches in the way the system delivers end-of-life care. Outcomes generated through the testing of ideas and models developed in 2017, the Lab’s first “pilot” year, will be applied to the development and delivery of leadership and systems change training programs. We will work with health care professionals and others in BC, with the intent of cultivating and growing a network of change agents who can impact transformational shifts in policies and practice, with the ultimate goal of improving care. Lab initiatives will also seed changes in our social systems, through the introduction of new ways of engaging society in dialogue around aging and death as a natural part of life.
$10,000.00
2016

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