Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

Access to Media Education Society

Mentor Me at Indigenous Fashion Week (MMIFW)

Mentor Me (MM) at Indigenous Fashion Week (IFW) (MMIFW) will engage urban Aboriginal youth in care in traininga nd mentorships to empower their identities, community relationships, and employability skill development, through IFW's celebration of Indigenous pride in the creative regalia arts that story Indigenous identity in collective cultural meaning. IFW will gather 30 Indigenous-Canadian designers and artists for the first national showcase of these international clothing artists. The ongiong Mentor Me weekly group engages 15 young Indigenous women transitioning from care. MMIFW will recruit, engage, train and mentor 30 Indigenous youth-in-care in 4 urban and 2 rural training workshops, mentorships and employment. Indigenous youth, all systemically affected by the foster system will develop cultural identity, relationship, and employment skills. They be mentored with the IFW team and cultural advisory networks, and will be employed as presenters and producers at the event. Workshops after the event will gather the knowledge of these engaged youth to evaluate and design an enhanced Mentor Me program. MMIFW will create strong relationships between young people and their community members. Their experiential research into effective mentorship and skills development, focused through the creative art of IFW, will build community knowledge of how to support youth transitioning from care, activated in the MMIFW network.
$24,000.00
2016

Adoptive Families Association of British Columbia

Permanency Project for At Risk Youth

For the first time, AFABC would like to host a 3-day family finding bootcamp for homeless youth, and former youth in care experiencing loneliness. Every child has a family/network, and they can be found. Family Finding Boot Camps are a three day immersion for up to 50 youth and former youth in care learning the philosophy, framework and skills of Family Finding practice. Participants work in small and medium sized teams, actually practicing Family Finding for youth currently homeless, at risk of becoming homeless, or are experiencing loneliness. We would invite lead practitioner Kevin Campbell to host. In his previous bootcamps across the USA participants have successfully completed the Discovery and initial Engagement steps of Family Finding. The goal for the teams by day three of the training is to have found relatives and other connections, identified family members with functional strengths, engaged two lead family members, and invited found adults to a Preparation and Planning Meeting to be held following the bootcamp. Participants leave the immersion experience having learned and practiced the skills of Family Finding, developed a sense of confidence in their use of the skills, and feel confident in their ability to develop a personal support network. Our focus at AFABC includes following up with youth to ensure they are supported as they connect. Partnership opportunities: Broadway Youth Centre, Covenant House, Aunt Leah's, Federation of BC Youth in Care.
$25,000.00
2016

Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society

Get Outside BC 2017 – Fostering Change Edition

CPAWS-BC believes that in order to ensure conservation is a long-term priority, we need to equip the next generation of youth to feel safe exploring nature; to defend socially, culturally and biologically important spaces; and to lead their peers along a similar journey. We also need to ensure that all youth have these skills and experiences, and not just a privileged few. Get Outside BC (GOBC) is a longer term youth-led leadership program that supports young people gain the mental and physical health benefits of being in wilderness, while also being a leader in a larger social and environmental change movement. After speaking with young people and social service organizations, we learned that youth in care were craving the opportunities that GOBC offered but faced many barriers to participation. For example, some programs were prohibitively expensive for youth, or social service organizations didn’t have the capacity to start these programs on top of their regular programming. CPAWS-BC will work with youth in care, youth agencies and other experts to redesign GOBC specifically to meet the needs of youth in care. In doing so, we will amplify youth voice and engage young people and youth-serving orgs in creating a program formula that ensures full access and participation. Our longer-term goal is to demonstrate our outcomes for the larger community in order to make more inclusive and accessible spaces.
$25,000.00
2016

Fugue Theatre Society

LES FILLES DU ROI

Les Filles du Roi is a new, tri-lingual musical that uses the deep relationships between language, art and culture to create opportunities for cross-cultural understanding. It serves Vancouver's Aboriginal, Francophone and new immigrant communities, with a focus on women and youth. Sung in a dialect of Iroquois, French and English, Les Filles du Roi traces the arrival of the historical filles du roi in the 1600s. Young fille du roi Marie Jeanne Lespérance finds her hopes for a new life are complicated by the competing interests of the people of Ville-Marie (later Montréal), the nearby Mohawk settlement of Kahnawà:ke, and the British settlements further south. Over the course of four tumultuous seasons, French, Mohawk, Métis and English characters build a complex web of relationships that sets the stage for the Canada we know today. Fugue Theatre has commissioned Julie McIsaac and Corey Payette to create this project as a way to address the historical roots of the current debates about migration, cultural diversity, gender equality and Aboriginal sovereignty. The project is inspired by the writers’ personal connections to their Francophone and Aboriginal heritage and by the need to grow diversity in Canadian theatre. By combining artistic creation with community outreach to Aboriginal youth, women, Francophones and new Canadians, Les Filles du Roi disrupts our ideas, beliefs and actions: building a peaceful, equitable society lies in reclaiming the voices of the past.
$25,000.00
2016

McCreary Centre Society

Changing outcomes for youth in care – A Collective Impact approach

Collective Impact is a process which can be used to bring about change in complex problems in our communities. The Vancouver based project is using the Collective Impact process to bring stakeholders, youth and service providers together around a common goal, to improve the unfavourable outcomes experienced by many youth leaving government care. There are five mutually reinforcing conditions that are essential to the success of a Collective Impact approach to addressing a complex problem: developing a common vision across all stakeholders; introducing shared measurement across a service system; creating mechanisms for coordinated planning of different parts of a service system; creation of continuous communication protocols across stakeholders; and investment in dedicated system coordination. Phase 1 of the initiative (2014-2016) entailed assessing if there was a shared vision as well as willingness and ability to move forward collectively to support youth transitioning out of care in Vancouver. An initial vision was established that no youth will "age out of care." This means the system will address the need for youth to have caring connections in place, before they reach the age of 19. In Phase 2 (2016-2018), shared measures will be developed, a governance structure will be finalized and implemented, and there will be a focus on ensuring youth “ageing out” of care will have five caring connections. Project participants will examine existing service provision systems and supports (both formal and informal) that would need to realign in order to meet the vision. The knowledge and momentum gained in Phase 2 will create the opportunity to implement real change moving forward into Phase 3 (the sustainable action and impact phase). This application is to support the first six months of Phase 2 (June – December, 2016).
$25,000.00
2016

Ray-Cam Co-operative Centre

RISE- ALIVE-Inclusion and Reconciliation for Children and Youth

This project is a focused inclusion Strategy to engage vulnerable children and support their active inclusion in community centre programs. It will also serve to increase understanding within municipal neighborhood institutions, building their capacity to do this work. The specific project will incorporate a Learning Circles model, with RISE Leaders utilizing the capacity of Aboriginal children and youth as peer leaders in summer day camps, sports, and recreation programs -- reaching out to be more inclusive of all children in the area. The goal is to help all children feel part of the group and to have fun -- and to minimize them feeling singled out, left out, overlooked or labelled as a problem by other kids or group leaders. The purpose is not to diagnose, but to accommodate and include. The training will assist youth leaders to: • develop an increased awareness of the challenges some children face in being included in activities with their peers • develop a repertoire of strategies to use when faced with situations such as a child becoming frustrated or anxious, or two children arguing • Engage as program leaders and volunteer ‘buddies’ in regular sharing and learning circles. Vancouver Park Board neighborhood­based community centres will become enabling structures/anchors to support this work. A city-level Reconciliation Team will manage incremental neighborhood engagement work starting with 3­5 centres in 2016. Appendix A contains a more detailed overview
$28,000.00
2016

Society for Affordable Housing Education, Awareness and Development

2017 Homeless Count

The Regional Steering Committee on Homelessness (RSCH) has conducted a regional homeless count every three years since 2002. In 2014, the last regional count, a total of 2,777 homeless people were counted in Metro Vancouver. 410 homeless children and youth were counted, representing 20% of the total individuals who responded to the age question. This included 88 children who were accompanied by a parent and under 19. The actual number of youth who are homeless - or who need help and services to end and prevent homelessness - is assumed to be much higher. With regards to youth, the project's goal is to provide a more accurate assessment of the number and demographic profile of homeless youth in Metro Vancouver. Our objectives are to: 1. Engage all youth-serving agencies across the lower mainland to participate in the Homeless Count to ensure that all youth are able to ‘count themselves in’ and answer the survey questions 2. Update existing information about homeless youth in Metro Vancouver: the number, demographic profile and trends since 2002. The gathered information provides organizations and communities with the evidence-base for attaining resources to be better able to undertake meaningful youth engagement and service delivery. Reflecting on past experiences we have decided to focus all our efforts on the core function of 'counting youth' through a robust youth strategy that is focused on agencies serving youth.
$20,000.00
2016

Society for Children and Youth of BC

Youth Led Staff Awareness Training

SCY will recruit and hire 4 youth in-and-out of care (2 in each of 2 communities), to partner with us in a Staff Training Project. They will identify customer service providers (ex. financial institutions) with whom they interact and who may benefit from awareness about experiences of youth in care and the importance of connections between these young people and their community. They will learn about the UNCRC and about a youth’s right to have their voice heard & valued. They will learn communication and workshop facilitation skills. They will work together and in consultation with other groups of youth, to build a training document and presentation for customer service staff to be co-facilitated by SCY and the Youth Coordinators. During past workshops with youth who are in or “aging out” of care, we learned about the common discrimination they experienced from customer service staff when those staff members learn that the youth they are serving are in foster care. For example, youth referred to financial institutions as being the main customer service providers that witness a young person’s ministry cheque, thus revealing their circumstances. One solution voiced by youth was the need for greater awareness. Groups we’ve talked to said they would be interested in training for staff. For example, Vancity said they make membership experience for youth a priority and are open to receiving youth-led staff training relating specifically to awareness building about youth in care.
$25,000.00
2016

Society Promoting Environmental Conservation (SPEC)

Climate Adaptation for Small-Scale Producers

Working with our partner organizations we will facilitate a series of workshops/tours, create extension material and create a demonstration site that focuses on priority issues (identified by farmers themselves) which consider future growing conditions as they relate to climate change. To add rigor to the workshops/tours and extension information, there will be a component of community-based research that combines academic resources with hands-on demonstration, for example: improved water monitoring/utilization techniques for multiple soil types, site specific soil quality indicators, hedgerow demonstrations, or integrated pest management. This program will explore ways in which farmers within a particular locale, who share similar site-specific challenges, can identify shared concerns and access expert help/research in addition to providing and sharing their own knowledge and advice. This community-based learning, enhanced by expert knowledge and real-world demonstrations, can provide information that is site specific, current, adaptable to changing conditions and, most importantly, shareable. In this way, farmers can access better information without huge costs and augment the collective knowledge base of farmers in their area. This project will support farmers where there is an identified need, in their efforts of responding to water, soil/nutrient and/or pest problems and will improve and increase food production in BC.
$20,000.00
2016

THE CINEMATHEQUE

STATUS UPDATE: CRITICAL CREATIONS ON SOCIAL MEDIA

The STATUS UPDATE project will contribute to systemic change in the beliefs that both youth and adults hold regarding social media and life online. Presentations, activities and workshops will kickstart meaningful and non-judgemental discussions amongst youth about our online lives. We will look at a variety of issues: self-representation, identity, the lure of social media, privacy and surveillance, online anonymity, and the exciting creative capacities of social media and online access. Each group of youth artists will be challenged to answer the following question: If you could explore one key idea with your younger peers (or your younger self) about social media, what would it be? Youth will be encouraged to choose diverse topics, and to experiment with video and other art practices to answer this question. Youth artists will bring their creations into nearby Elementary Schools, using their artwork to teach younger peers about positive, thoughtful and creative uses of social media. In our experience, youth better understand ideas when they engage in peer mentorship. In this way, our test program will influence changes of habit and beliefs of both the youth and children involved, with the media and curriculum produced extending that change well beyond our project. The youth-produced art will also take centre stage in an exhibit that will bring older generations into this conversation and challenge common protectionist attitudes towards youth and digital citizenship.
$22,000.00
2016

Victoria Child Abuse Prevention & Counselling Centre

Victoria Child Advocacy Centre

This project will influence Systemic Change towards the Broad Outcome of "supporting children/youth to improve their health and wellbeing" by addressing the following social determinants of health: 1. Social Support Networks: project strengthens support networks that help child abuse victims; strategies to solve problems and deal with adversity, manage crises and life circumstances 2. Social Environment: service co- location is a community response sharing resources for victims seeking to regain trust, family functioning and healing and reduce effects of abuse and violence 3. Coping Skills: promotes resiliency, self care, safety planning, crises management, positive child & family development 4. Healthy Child Development: supports secure attachments in families; educates caregivers The project builds upon capacity of children and youth to articulate their experience and police and forensic examiners to collect critical evidence in safe,supportive environments in the child's best interest. It reduces barriers and is a model of multistakeholder involvement (police, health, mental health) and contributes to a safe/caring community and expedites evidence collection - that has been found to result in fewer trials, increased convictions and less trauma for families.
$24,000.00
2016