Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

British Columbia's Women's Hospital and Health Centre Foundation

Changing Perceptions: Reimagining Sexual Assault to Better Support Survivors

In BC (2014) there were ~70,000 self-reported incidents of sexual assault (SA). In contrast only 2,341 SA were reported to police in the same year. Victim-blaming contributes to a culture where SA survivors’ credibility is undermined, evidenced by a reluctance to disclose or report to authorities. Low conviction rates and well-publicized SA case rulings reinforce public perceptions that minimize the severity of SA. Systemic re-victimization compounds survivors’ trauma and creates barriers that reduce willingness to disclose and access support services. Never has public awareness about SA in Canada been so high, creating an opportunity for changes in both public attitude and policy. The social innovation this research project will explore is how to stimulate a shift in the public discourse around SA toward less victim-blaming and more trauma-informed responses across multiple systems (health, justice and education). BCW and EVA BC will work with survivors, community-based organizations, and SA response systems, to investigate how power holders influence public perceptions of SA and how public perceptions of SA influence survivors’ willingness to disclose and access support. Knowledge generated from this project will facilitate safer environments for survivors to disclose and access support services and improve trauma-informed responses to SA across multiple sectors in BC.
$224,553.00
2016

CCEDNet

Social Finance for Community Health and Well Being in British Columbia

Firstly we will compile a summary of existing research on impacts and models of place-based social finance in Canada and BC, and use that evidence to invite participation in and inform a "Learning Community" of practitioner and policy stakeholders in BC that will be convened over the lifetime of the project. Secondly we will support the implementation of two investment vehicles by the Vancouver Island Community Investment Cooperative that are currently in development. One is a Community Loan Fund in partnership with an Island based Credit Union that will invite contributions to a dedicated GIC the deposits in which will serve as collateral for loans to affordable rental housing, renewable energy, sustainable agriculture and fisheries, First Nations economic development, and other local owned ethical enterprises that create social benefits and community impacts. The other vehicle is a securities regulated investment fund that is RRSP eligible that will be implemented in partnership with a Securities Registered Investment Management Company to support the same types of community benefits. Thirdly we will evaluate both the social and economic impact of the funds and use that information to inform stakeholders and the Learning Community and assist with dialogue with the BC Government, the media, the finance sector, the Securities Commission, and municipalities on enabling public policy needed to help a place-based retail social financing to grow to scale in BC.
$225,000.00
2016

Disability Alliance BC

The Right Fit Pilot Project: Facilitating Occupancy of Wheelchair Accessible Housing

DABC and our RFPP steering committee partners are seeking to change the system of wheelchair accessible housing provision in Metro Vancouver. Our desired outcome is the removal of the systemic barriers we have highlighted, so that wheelchair users can obtain the housing and supports they need through an accessible, timely and efficient process. The 3-year RFPP is designed to be a systemic intervention to test the development of fast track policies and procedures in MSDSI, the region's Health Authorities, linking and growing an enhanced registry of available accessible housing, and utilizing financial incentives for housing providers to maintain vacancies until wheelchair users can occupy their available accessible units. The RFPP will accommodate a constant caseload flow of 20 wheelchair users with the expectation that 60 or more will be served over the 3-year period. The RFPP aims to test the following system changes in Metro Vancouver: • Health authorities pre-screen and pre-approve home support and occupational therapy needs assessments; • MSDSI streamlines existing equipment allocation processes for eligible RFPP participants; • Housing providers funnel all accessible housing vacancies through the RFPP; • BC Housing makes funding available to housing providers to hold appropriate units until a RFPP participant can occupy a unit; • RFPP participants receive specialized case management and peer support to enable them to access units as quickly as possible.
$223,538.00
2016

Fraser Basin Council Society

Rural Housing First

The project is to pilot a rural HF program, and to test the model on a small scale with a targeted group prior to scaling up the approach to meet the broader community needs. Ultimately, the entire process of housing and support will be redesigned as per the principles of HF: 1. Immediate access to permanent housing with no housing readiness requirements 2. Choice and self-determination 3. Recovery orientation 4. Individualized supports 5. Social and community integration We will redesign housing access processes and protocols to maximize the use of existing resources for a test group of clients. Current access for marginalized and vulnerable clients is based on individuals seeking housing services directly from each service. The proposed approach will coordinate access, and utilize existing outreach staff to identify clients who are need of housing and supports. We will work directly in partnership with landlords to ensure appropriate placement and ongoing support of the landlord-tenant relationship. The Housing and Homelessness Committee will serve as program advisors, redesign intake and case management protocols, and assist with client eligibility assessments. We will aim to complete integrated intake and assessment and housing for a maximum of 20 clients annually and provide ongoing supports as needed. The pilot will be evaluated from the perspective of clients, workers, community partners, landlords, and other relevant stakeholders.
$221,750.00
2016

Institute of Families for Child & Youth Mental Health

FamilySmart Network - Ready, Set, Collaborate

The World Health Organization developed a Framework for action that speaks to the necessity for interprofessional education in order to achieve collaborative practice & the Institute of Families believes this can be broadened by testing the inclusion of young people & families in collective learning that results in all being collaborative practice ready. We have tangible experiences, skills and examples that will be built on in our proposed test. For research expertise we will partner with the McCreary Centre & Stigma & Resilience Among Vulnerable Youth Centre (SARAVYC). Our project is to test & prove our belief that there is a pre-step before implementation of collaborative practice, which we refer to as being ‘Practice Ready’ & offer recommendations & practical practices for how to ensure professionals & youth & families are ready & able to collaborate successfully together. We will build on the current knowledge & experience that we have in engagement, empowerment, collaborating & connecting & invite all disciplines to come along-side young people & families to collectively learn from each other & prepare to be collaborative practice ready. We believe that professionals & lay people can & should be empowered & supported to be contributors & influencers. Everyone has distinct & specialized knowledge that is valuable & necessary to build communities where children, youth & families are safe, included, connected & supported. They are all interdisciplinary team members.
$225,000.00
2016

Lookout Society

Tide Pools: Art Thrives

The Lookout Society has worked with people with low or no income who have few, if any, housing or support options for over 40 years in the DTES area. Regaining and maintaining stability requires access to healthy choices and livelihoods. For many here this includes creative practices and social programs. Through our partnership with Gallery Gachet this project will strengthen outreach to community art programs. We will grow external relations to enhance training and mentorship. We can advance our community artists’ livelihoods. The Canada Council recognizes arts training beyond college and university education and includes mentorship, a history of exhibition, peer recognition and civic arts involvement as contributing to an artist’s profile. We can increase artist’s access to artist fees and recognize the Supreme Court of Canada’s 2014 decision to protect the minimal rights of artists to be paid. We will find new and alternative venues for exhibition, performance, sales and social engagement and we will broaden our participation in realms of cultural production beyond our neighbourhood. This project will advance both outreach and 'inreach'. With the support of staff and volunteers we will improve points of contact with culture-producing venues to gain and share a clear picture of arts programming. Identifying gaps, Gallery Gachet will create new educational opportunities and form a community alliance for the arts.
$225,000.00
2016

NEC Native Education College

Northwest Coast Arts Heritage Project

The project will develop and strengthen networks and systems for Northwest Coast First Nations traditional cultural arts education and transmission. The project will build on the successful Northwest Coast Jewellery Arts certificate program at the NEC and the credit laddering partnership with Emily Carr University of Art and Design. Project partnerships will expand to the Kwaguilth, Nuu-Chah-Nulth, Haida, Tsimsian, Gitksan and Nisga'a Nations to develop further structures for formline art and silver carving transmission. This will include links with the Aboriginal owned cultural tourism facilities including the Haida Cultural Centre, U'Mista Cultural Museum, Aboriginal Tourism BC and educational facilities such as the Wilp Wilxo'osh'whl Nisga'a College and the Frieda Deising School of Northwest Coast Art. In addition to one delivery of the Northwest Coast Jewellery Arts certificate program in Vancouver, the program will be delivered in partnership with one First Nation or First Nations organization on Vancouver Island and one on the north coast over the duration of the project. The support letters from the community of Skidegate on Haida Gwaii and three First Nations near Port Hardy on Vancouver Island are appended. A diploma level of the program or a second certificate in Arts and Cultural Management will be developed by the project.
$224,000.00
2016

Pacific Autism Family Centre Society

GO Group

The GO Group strategy seeks to address the gap in employment equity services, with a focus on providing relevant vocational skills building and tangible work experience. Given our internal capacity, PAFC is uniquely able to implement a robust social enterprise strategy to fulfill operational needs. GO Group is a multi-venture social enterprise with a vocational development backbone; the GO Group ventures are: 1) GO Café, 2) GO Custodial, 3) GO Landscaping, 4) GO Business Solutions and 5) GO Innovation. GO (Goal Oriented) positions are paid, part-time employment positions, with a term ranging from 6 months to 2 years, based on person centered intake process, planning and goal acquisition. The intent of the GO position term is for individuals to articulate specific goals within a skill development framework focused on a position/industry they are interested in. When goals are achieved, individuals will be referred to an employment placement agency. PAFC will then assist the agency in securing the GO employee mainstream community employment. All operations would be inclusive, the ratio of neuro-typical staff to individuals with diverse abilities will depend on the business specific requirements of each venture. All GO employment is intentionally supportive with in house job coaching and support staff, specialized learning tools and peer mentorship components, all run through a standardized tracking and reporting method, such as the Open Badges learning management software.
$224,850.00
2016

Phoenix Transition Society

Harmony House: Holistic Perinatal Supportive Housing for Women Struggling with Substance Use

The proposed project aims to provide upstream prevention and early intervention supports to women struggling with substance use, especially Indigenous women, while they are pregnant and during the post-partum period using a decolonizing approach. The project will 1) provide safe and supportive housing in Prince George that will deliver a harm reduction, holistic model of care that has only previously been modeled in large urban centers and, 2) provide comprehensive services targeted at pregnant substance-using women adressing medical, mental, emotional and spiritual health. The program will assist women to gain life-skills, Elder mentorship, ready access to pre and postpartum education and support, assistance in moving into independent living with their infants, and break generational cycles of substance-use and child apprehension in communities. An important, and unique aspect of this project will be incorporation of Indigenous traditions and approaches to health with Aboriginal grandmothers at the center of our approach. Our project will influence systemic change towards health and well-being by targeting social determinants affecting vulnerable, pregnant women. More than solely housing, our approach aims to model culturally safe, wrap-around care for at risk women in a way that is highly scalabe to other rural and remote settings. Furthermore, this project follows a holistic and decolonizing approach to care - an emergent approach to providing care accross the north.
$225,000.00
2016

Surrey Art Gallery Association

Youth Engagement Strategy (YES) Program

SOCIAL INNOVATION: SAGA’s Partnering to Advance Social Capital through Strengthening Youth and Community Art Surrey is an increasingly important urban centre with a diverse, multi-ethnic population of over 500,000, with 40% under the age of 30 (30% of population is under 19, and a further 10% are under 30) and the province’s largest school district. 1,000 new residents arrive each month, not including children born here. Since 1984, SAGA has partnered with the Surrey Art Gallery (audience 50,000 annually), and other cultural and community organizations, to further its mission to advance community engagement with the contemporary arts and to support artists. Youth Engagement Strategy (YES) Program will enhance connection with and develop programming for youth and young adults. This initiative will implement and evaluate best practices for engaging young people between the ages of 15-30 in Surrey. Social Innovations include: partnering to advance social capital; shifting power dynamics; enabling young people to learn from and with artists and their community to build their skills; providing programs driven by youth for youth; and demonstrating potential of sustainable growth for participants, partners, and community.
$225,000.00
2016

The Prince George Activators Society

GroundWork PG Education and Employment Program (aka GWPG)

With the goal of affecting the routines, resources and beliefs on a micro and macro level, GWPG will be divided into 3 interwoven, successive components. Participants will begin with a 120 day Aboriginal Wellness and employment education program at Aghelh Nebun – a remotely located Aboriginal focused facility. Within the education component, participants will take a variety of courses which will help them overcome employment barriers. Courses that pertain to the housing industry (carpentry, drywall, painting) will be combined with life skill courses (First Aid, Financial Literacy and Conflict Resolution). Simultaneously, participants will work with Lheidli T'enneh Elder Marcel Gagnon in the Soaring with Eagles program which promotes healing through developing increased knowledge, discipline and self-awareness. The courses will be structured towards Aboriginal learners and a Cultural Education Assistant will work with the Elder and participants in a reciprocal learning environment - providing assistance and support as needed. After completing the 120 days, participants will begin the first of two paid work experience segments at Aghelh Nebun. While earning a wage, participants will utilize the skills they have acquired during the courses in a controlled work environment (2-8 months). When the participants are ready they will transfer into Prince George and further their employment experience working with various community organizations on the GWPG community crew (3-12 months).
$225,000.00
2016

UBC - Office of Research Services

Promoting access to care for women affected by intimate partner violence in the Downtown Eastside

The research project will test an innovative trauma informed outreach intervention to promote access to support services among highly isolated and vulnerable women experiencing intimate partner violence (IPV) in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside (DTES). Our team’s earlier research identified many women experienced limited access to anti-violence and other health and social services necessary to prevent IPV and reduce its deleterious effects (e.g., poverty, homelessness, HIV, mental illness). Although supports exist barriers remain due to isolation, control by partners, knowledge gaps about services, and negative care encounters in formal clinical settings. Outreach activities are needed to connect support workers with women in ways that are non-harmful or re-traumatizing. This reflects a growing body of international inter-disciplinary research calling for trauma-informed care and services for vulnerable populations. Other research with women experiencing IPV demonstrated trauma-informed outreach facilitated access and uptake of services with direct health and wellbeing benefits. Through a participatory action research (PAR) approach involving researchers, health and social service leaders/staff and women experiencing IPV we will build on the capacity of current services to learn if and how integrating a trauma informed approach to outreach services facilitates women’s connections with health and social services and improves service coordination to address the populations’ needs.
$224,840.00
2016

Urban Ink Production Society

Reclaiming Space for Indigenous Arts

The social innovation of this project is to produce large-scale, mainstream, socially conscious and community engaged productions for 3 test years. During these seasons, there will be large scale work, led by Indigenous artists. This is an essential part of the social innovation of this project, as not only will Indigenous artists be being given ongoing work but also our community and audience will broaden through a more ongoing programming. The projects over the three years will focus a spotlight on the voices of Indigenous women through the following works: "Moonlodge" by Margo Kane - Agnes(Cree) has somehow finished high school, and now she’s hitch-hiking to California – or maybe New Mexico. Wherever the music is. Wherever the Powwow is. Wherever her family is. Only the venerable Margo Kane has ever performed this seminal solo work, full of life and wit, a classic of Indigenous Canadian theatre. "Unnatural and Accidental Women" by Marie Clements - The Unnatural and Accidental Women is a surrealist dramatization of a thirty-year murder case involving many mysterious deaths in the “Skid Row” area of Vancouver. "Sedna" by Reneltta Arluk & Corey Payette -Sedna is the Inuit goddess and a powerful force in Nunavut and around the Arctic circle. In tracing her story through Nunavut, Greenland, Norway, and Russia we awaken audiences outside of the North to be respectful of our oceans. It is an empowering Indigenous story about our women and their strength in our society.
$225,000.00
2016

UVIC - Office of Research Services

Diploma in Indigenous Community Development and Governance

The overall purpose of the diploma program as a social innovation project is to strengthen capacity of Indigenous communities with respect to governance and community development. Over the next six years, 60-80 graduates will contribute to Indigenous communities and influence significant systemic change. The program will help to develop related social innovation initiatives including the new Indigenous evaluation frameworks, performance measures and high impact in-community project reports that promote successful cases or offer solutions to community needs assessments. These initiatives will take place through coursework and capstone projects that demand real-world problem solving with in-community clients. We expect to strengthen the governance and self-determination aspirations and capacity of Indigenous peoples across BC in traditional areas and urban settings. The program will have wide-spread effect because it features accessible distance delivery with appropriate face-to-face connections and is steeped in community perspectives. Graduates’ ability to manage, negotiate and advocate on behalf of their communities will influence systemic change. We expect within 1 year of graduation, graduates will strengthen their communities directly and indirectly with about: - 40% taking on advanced positions in community through a leadership role. - 40% taking on advanced positions through a leadership role in organizations impacting on Indigenous communities.
$225,000.00
2016

Vancity Community Foundation

Regional Poverty Reduction Hubs: Connecting Communities for Upstream Action

There's nothing like meeting face to face and building relationships in local communities. We learned that when we travelled around the province hosting community workshops and we want to build on that to become a truly engaged provincial network. We have developed a very productive coalition of groups working on anti-poverty initiatives within Metro Vancouver and we plan to take the best practices of this work and test them in 2 other regions in BC (Okanagan and North). These regions have been selected because of their differences in public and political support for this systemic change so they will provide a productive comparison for growing the network in the future. Our work is focused on three streams: building capacity of our member organizations, including increased opportunities for collaboration (with the aim of impacting the resource flows of a social system, how knowledge and people can interact in different ways); increasing public awareness of these issues and the need for systemic change (to influence beliefs and routines); and political advocacy (to change the authority flows of a social system). We plan to take these into other regions by setting up 2 Regional Poverty Reduction Hubs with provision of regional coordinators and expansion of our programs, including a Leadership Development program, regional Speaker Series events, coordinating action research with local partners, and producing outreach material (video, online, print) that resonates locally.
$225,000.00
2016

Vancouver Native Health Society

Innovating a Primary Healthcare System to Reduce Structural Violence

The social innovation of this project is the inclusion of Indigenous Elders in genuine partnership with primary care providers in urban clinic environments. Although this sounds simple, genuine partnership with Indigenous Elders necessitates tackling the systemic challenges of discordant values and epistemologies, that underlie the perpetuation of structural violence and associated lack of infrastructure and resources for Indigenous health services. Although this process has already begun at VNHS, there are still significant system challenges that need to be addressed. VNHS's attempt to address systemic challenges will include creating more opportunities for Elders, primary care providers, community members, and administrators to engage in meaningful dialogue. The dialogue will focus on establishing a clear set of shared health system values and identifying and addressing causes of structural violence. Resources can then be used to draft a shared clinic mission statement, and collaboratively seek solutions to systemic barriers such as inadequate space for ceremony within the clinic. We also aim to foster increased opportunities for meaningful participation by patients, community members, clinic staff and physicians in Elder-led ceremonies, which we have identified as a key cultural process with strong potential to diminish power inequalities.
$224,040.00
2016

West Coast Environmental Law Research Foundation

Climate Law in our Hands

What if climate impacted communities could demand accountability from the fossil fuel industry? BC is uniquely placed to force a conversation about industry responsibility for climate change and its costs. We will foster legal and community action aimed at demanding accountability from fossil fuel companies, ultimately leading to a local government class action against fossil fuel companies. By focusing on harm suffered by BC communities, we can hold Chevron, Exxon and similar companies responsible for the impact of their global share of emissions. Public demands for accountability and especially a lawsuit will both require and result in broader public education and discussion. Convincing local governments to take such action will require British Columbians to understand and support fossil fuel industry accountability. The success of litigation depends on a broad societal shift in understanding the role of the fossil fuel industry in causing climate change. We will undertake provincial coordination, support and networking between groups seeking to promote public discussion of the harm caused to their communities by the fossil fuel industry and the potential for litigation, including providing legal educational materials;* and provide submissions and assistance to local governments that might act as plaintiffs in a class action. *Any tasks involving activities considered political by the CRA will be carried out to a large extent by our sister organization, WCELA
$225,000.00
2016