Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

Arts in Action Society

19th Birthday Party Exhibition Tour

To plan, facilate, and curate an exhibition tour of the 19th Birthday Party, an interactive media installation that serves as a central provocative agent for public dialogue and education surrounding issues relating to youth in government care. The tour will work with between 4 to 7 host organizations in municipalities across the lower mainland, including: Aunt Leah’s Society in New Westminster, Lu’Ma Native Housing Society in East Vancouver, and community organizations and partners in Surrey, Burnaby, North Vancouver and Abbotsford. Co-directors of Housing Matters Media Porject will work closely with partnering host organizations in each municipality to create an art engagement and/or social event that accompanies the installation to further encourage community dialogue.
$52,385.00
2016

We Are Everywhere

We Are Everywhere is a community engaged art project led by artists Corin Browne and Patti Fraser, advocate and project coordinator Violet Rose Pharoah and communication professionals to mentor a small group of youth with lived foster care experience to collaboratively create a high-quality book, featuring interviews, stories and photographs of community members from across the lower mainland who are former youth in care, exploring their daily lives and sharing what has helped them survive and thrive. The project will include a post-project evaluation process with research and planing for longterm distribution of the book, including the potential social enterprise development with youth participants The mainstream narrative associated with foster care is a negative, recycled story that speaks about the issue without the actual voice of those with lived experience. The foster care population carries the social stigma of “failure” and even those closest to them usually have very little expectations for their futures. While crucial to acknowledge the realities that individuals from foster care face, many are carving out lives defined by their own personal definition of success; quietly creating new narratives that defy the preconceived notions about life after foster care. These stories deserve the opportunity to be shared and have the potential to inspire youth aging out of the system, as well as shift the current perpetuated narrative.
$50,000.00
2016

CIVIX

CIVIX Education: Project B.C.

The project will foster a systemic commitment to Student Vote and civic engagement within the education system, and improve the instructional capacity of educators in lead up to the 2017 provincial election. CIVIX will strengthen relationships with education stakeholders and administrators through in-person meetings and strategic communications to increase the scope and impact of the program, and facilitate expanded outreach strategies and support networks of institutional entrepreneurs. CIVIX will coordinate Democracy Bootcamp(s) to train teachers to become ambassadors of democracy in their school community. This will result in more positive and widespread outcomes among students in the key areas associated with future voting, such as increasing political knowledge and interest, and fostering a sense of civic duty. Working towards improved teacher capacity and commitment not only generates better Student Vote results, but creates systemic change by instilling the importance of democratic engagement and contributing to greater civic education outcomes for years to come. Student Vote also has an impact beyond the classroom. A 2011 independent evaluation reported that the program fostered political dialogue at home and 20% of parents agreed that their child’s participation in Student Vote positively affected their decision to vote. Scaling Student Vote deep and out is expected to grow this broad outcome and increase political participation among older Canadians as well
$60,000.00
2016

Contemporary Art Gallery Society of British Columbia

BMFH Artist-in-Residence: Artists Collaborating in Community

CAG uses the BMFH as a studio to incubate socially-engaged participatory projects in Vancouver, programs strategically identified as missing in the cultural provision of the city. From this site we develop multi-year community-focused residency initiatives. Hosting up to twelve Canadian/international artists in collaboration with and as mentors to local groups, organizations and communities over a three year period, this hub connects with diverse audiences such as youth, families and the under-privileged. Each artist is invited to undertake research and outreach toward new production in consideration of resonant urban issues and local histories, often self-identified by community participants, generating platforms where art is a catalyst for local exchange and dialogue among a range of voices and perspectives. BMFH enables us to work with communities and artists sitting outside of conventional gallery contexts, representing, and encompassing a differing set of concerns, scale, timeframe and approach than typical exhibition making. Furthermore it challenges notions of the artist as auteur, instead considering community-based participation and social activism as a methodology for production, thus allowing artists to set a structure but audience determines content. This format of urban residency is unique to and innovative in Canada, institutionally not happening elsewhere. CAG proposes to develop this program through implementing a series of public projects through to mid-2019.
$60,000.00
2016

Fraser Region Aboriginal Friendship Centre Association

Young Warriors Indigenous Youth Leading Change

Building on the relationships established, and needs identified in Phase One of the FCGrant, FRAFCA will develop an innovative program that would offer youth in, and from foster care a chance to represent themselves in the City of Surrey’s planning and decision-making process. We will complete this task by: 1) Creating a safe youth-only space to provide resources and meet on a regular basis; 2) develop an Indigenous Youth Leadership Training model and train two youth facilitators using the Indigenize Curriculum and addresses the 6 domains as well as their unique barriers to post care services. 3) establishing the Surrey Indigenous Youth Planning Table with key stakeholders. 4) Hold a Youth Honouring Event in partnership with Kwantlen First Nation that would invite the public to learn more about the experiences of Indigenous youth aging out of care; 5)prepare a gap analysis report and briefing note for the City of Surrey Council meeting in the fall. This year in the City of Surrey 56 Indigenous youth will age out of foster care. Surrey is home to 12000 aboriginal people. The median population age is 25.2 years old, which means it’s a young population with 50 percent under the age of 25. In our Phase One project, titled the Rites of Passage Project a major need identified was for appropriate and safe housing for youth aging out of care in Surrey. 50% of our participants were homeless at one point during our last project.
$50,000.00
2016

Mascall Dance Society

Put The Kettle On

Put the Kettle On (PKO) is a youth-led dance community event that provides marginalized youth access to creation, production and management. The PKO artistic team will partner with community service agencies in Port Hardy and inner-city Vancouver. PKO disrupts basic routine (how we act and what we do), providing structured workshops that offer a foundation in dance and rhythmic movement, a physical outlet for self-expression and a shared dance experience that creates a sense of community/culture. Further, PKO disrupts resource flow (money, knowledge, people) to provide youths unique access to artistic expression. Participants will learn to create, produce and manage a community dance event from start to finish. In recognition of the time and commitment of involved youth, PKO will pay honoraria. Shoes and socks are supplied. Meals will be provided at workshops for the duration of the project. A sense of authentic achievement comes from making art with others and bringing it to life in event form. From a healthy creative outlet for self-expression, a toolkit of practical and emotional skills, and a connection with others comes empowerment. It is likely that with this experience, participants will go on to engage in artistic production in future.
$57,447.00
2016

Nanaimo Child Development Centre Society

Creating Systemic Change for Physically Disabled Youth in Need of Mental Health Services

Navigation programs are an important short term strategy to help families make their way through a complex & often segregated array of mental health services. They are also a path to direct action to resolve barriers to care, achieving systemic reform. Having recently received a grant & some Board funding to test such a program, the NCDC will assess the extent to which it can influence the latter. At a systems level, by liaising with families with lived experience, mental health support groups & clinicians, adjunct care agencies & funding bodies, the navigator will “map the system” resulting in the identification of the common challenges & service gaps facing families & highlight promising practices & potential opportunities for systemic change. At a clinical level, clients are initially triaged by a NCDC Zone Team. If a Team cannot manage a client's needs, the navigator will enlist support from the broader community, promoting agency collaboration & integration of mental health services. At an individual level, families engaged in program development will, with peer support, begin to advocate for change. Work at all levels will, we believe, change the way we interact with clients, provider groups & funders; identify pressure points & force a reallocation of resources internally & externally; inform public policy. It expects us to be innovative, to rethink the current landscape & acknowledge that systemic change requires patience, persistence, & commitment.
$50,000.00
2016

Native Courtworker & Counselling Association of B.C.

Building Consensus Towards a Better Outcomes Strategy for Aboriginal Children

The newly-formed Aboriginal Justice Council, a collaborative partnership between three major First Nations change agents in BC, aims to facilitate social inclusion for Aboriginal children who are impacted by ongoing exclusion, stigmatization, and trauma as a result of their involvement in the child protection and justice systems. The Aboriginal Justice Council will work with government agencies as equals to identify issues in existing mechanisms, policies, procedures, and processes and develop consensus on a better justice outcomes strategy to reduce the numbers of Aboriginal children removed from families and communities and placed into foster care and jails, and to increase their belonging and inclusion. This project will disrupt the existing system by creating a new highly credible and trusted key player that cannot be ignored or merely accommodated but whose recommendations must be adhered to. This requires frank dialogue on years of disinvestment and disempowerment resulting from colonial governance and practice and the profound lack of interest, sense of accountability, and empathy concerning the legacy of adverse results for Aboriginal people. The council will focus its attention, as mandated by the people, on creating meaningful change in existing systems that will facilitate social inclusion for all Aboriginal children in BC who are part of the overrepresentation in or vulnerable to becoming part of the justice and child protection systems, and their families.
$59,830.00
2016

Network of Inner City Community Services Society

Social Credit Lending System For Young People

The goal of the project is to assess the viability of a social credit lending system for young people who have aged out of care. During crises, these young people often lack a financial safety net. NICCSS has undertaken preliminary conversations with YACs from VACFSS and Aunt Leah's in order to locate the gaps for young people who have aged out of care that could be filled by an ethical lending system. They reported that young people often lack funds for basic needs such as food, housing, medical cost and transportation, as well for aspirational needs like technology, education, career and personal development. The project would work with young people, community partners, financial institutions, health care providers, housing providers, and corporations to develop an ethical social credit lending system responsive to the needs of young people, giving them choice without miring them in needless debt. The project would work to establish a social credit score system whereby young people would receive "credit" for demonstrating connectedness to community and pro-social activities that would give them access to much-needed capital. Young people often face poverty; the project’s repayment system would allow young people to be successful in meeting the terms of their loan by accepting cash repayments, as well as goal-related and meaningful experiences such as volunteer work or work skills development, which will further increase community connections and pro-social activities.
$50,000.00
2016

Pembina Foundation for Environmental Research and Education

Engaging British Columbians in shaping our collective climate legacy

This year, project staff met with 150+ organizations to better understand why & how these groups might wish to engage on climate policy. Several have become central allies. Clean Energy BC (power producers), Green Jobs BC (labour+NGOs), Climate Smart (businesses), the Bowen Group (high-emission industries + ENGOs), the Urban Development Institute (building developers), Union of BC Municipalities, Organizing for Change (ENGOs) and others have worked with us to highlight opportunities to advance climate policy collectively with their members. We are seeking funding for a 3-year Test Grant to strategically expand & deepen the participation of British Columbians in climate action. This will also allow us to respond to more requests from grassroots groups, First Nations and community leaders to provide analysis and assistance on development issues relevant to them. With climate policy windows officially open federally and provincially, groups can now advocate effectively (using a GHG emissions lens) on issues such as pipelines, tankers, fracking, LNG, etc. We will test & expand our engagement, by partnering with key allies across strategic sectors (e.g., buildings, industry, ENGOs, labour, local government, First Nations, grassroots groups and media) to engage their networks in shaping climate policy. This work will change “how we act”, “money, knowledge & people”, and “laws, policies & rules”, and in promoting a more engaged society, will inform our “values & beliefs".
$50,000.00
2016

Tsow-Tun Le Lum Society

Creating Culturally Safe Workplaces for Indigenous Workers in the Social Care Sector

Over 52% of the children in youth in MCFD care are Aboriginal yet only 5% of MCFD’s 4200 staff are of Aboriginal heritage. Similar disparities exist in community agencies. However, research suggests that life outcomes are improved when Aboriginal children and families are served by staff who share cultural knowledge and experience, and who integrate cultural perspectives and teachings into their practice and care. This project will assist MCFD and community-based child, youth and family-serving agencies to address significant human resources and organizational issues that are compromising the capacity to deliver effective services and care to Aboriginal children, youth and families, i.e. recruitment, retention and practice challenges that are amplified within culturally unsafe workplaces. Specifically, the proposed project will complement cultural agility work that is currently underway in MCFD and through FCSSBC's Leadership 2020 initiative to: 1. Engage Aboriginal staff within MCFD and community agencies to better understand current state, key recruitment and retention factors and qualities of culturally safe workplaces 2. Convene staff, organizational, community and thought leaders in an 'innovation lab' to co-design an Aboriginal Organizational Development strategy and practices to enhance cultural safety 3. Share stories, emerging knowledge and practices to inspire organizations to address barriers and build cultural safety for clients/staff
$50,000.00
2016

Two Rivers Gallery

MakerLab Youth Immersion

MakerLab Youth Immersion will work with the local organizations to recruit twelve youth ages 15-20 each spring, with at least 50% of the participants self-identified as Aboriginal. Over the course of each year-long project youth will learn through a combination of Mentor-led modules and self-directed learning. MakerLab Youth Immersion teaches cultural competencies, introducing youth to Northwest Coast design, carving, wood turning, and metalsmithing, as well as new media which they cannot access in their high schools: laser cutting and 3D printing. Unlike in the education system, Mentors will work with small groups of students, ensuring that individuals get the attention they need to help them thrive. Youth will learn through multi-generational sharing with Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Mentors. These connections will help shape these individuals as they make important decisions regarding their education and careers. Modules will include three weeks of instruction in traditional and new technologies, including training on MakerLab equipment, followed by self-guided exploration in an area determined by each individual. Unlike the formal education system, this is self-directed learning with the youth in the driver’s seat. Finally, youth will exhibit their creations alongside their Mentors, demonstrating not only the flow of knowledge from Mentor to youth, but the influence of the youth on their Mentors.
$58,000.00
2016

Watari Research Association

Youth Housing Collaboratory

The Youth Health & Housing Collaboratory is an initiative currently funded by Fostering Change. The Collaboratory's goal is to generate positive change and improve the experience of vulnerable/marginalized youth with complex needs who seek and access housing and related health services in Vancouver. It brings partners together to work better and differently to meet youth health, social, and housing needs. The Collaboratory has achieved several goals since its inception: 1.Establishing a Collaboratory problem solving group – to implement collectively arrived at solutions based on collectively arrived at processes 2.Engaging stakeholders to collaboratively identify and action initial improvements within the continuum of housing and related services for youth 16-24. 3. Securing commitment for sustainable collective process that will be able to support ongoing implementation of new solutions in the realm of youth access to housing. The purpose of next phase is to: Implement/test/assess impact of ‘probes’ (i.e. small, doable but significant systems and practice changes) that have been informed by the youth and service provider engagement work to date. To improve services and the experience of youth who are dealing with multiple challenges. Continue to engage youth to help identify most promising ‘probes’ and next iterations/ideas. Work together to extend/amplify/spread probes into practice and system. Continue learn,share knowledge and build a community of practice.
$50,000.00
2016

Yellowstone to Yukon Conservation Initiative

Upstream, Downstream: A Collaborative Approach to Cumulative Effects

A Murray River Watershed Working Group (WWG) led by First Nations as stewards of the land, with resource companies, Y2Y, provincial government and other technical, academic and community representatives invited as appropriate, will use facilitated meetings and a series of 4-5 community workshops to deepen mutual understanding of the local and broader context and shape the CEA Framework. Together they will forge a common agenda and agree on the CEA Framework scope, process and timeframes, with the workshops helping to flesh it out and draw on local and traditional ecological knowledge. This will root the Framework in the values of the communities that use the 175km-long Murray River—specifically First Nations communities – but also take into account broader community and resource needs and industrial, academic, technical and government input. Saulteau First Nations, West Moberly First Nations and MacLeod Lake Indian Band have already confirmed their WWG representation. This project will bring together people who share an interest in the great natural resources of the Peace region, but who may have quite different perspectives, to collaboratively create a CEA Framework and process, which will ultimately inform and enable a more balanced and integrated land-use approach. It will also provide an innovative model for cross-sector working on land-use planning that reflects and respects aboriginal rights and values, supporting their continued use and enjoyment of the land.
$55,000.00
2016