Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

Ecojustice Canada Society

Protecting Marine Habitat and Orcas in the Salish Sea

In June 2016, Ecojustice launched a legal challenge of the National Energy Board’s (NEB) report and recommendation to approve Kinder Morgan’s pipeline expansion. As participants in the two year review, we filed uncontroverted evidence of harm to at-risk southern resident killer whales. For one, Kinder Morgan concedes it cannot mitigate noise impacts on the whales from a seven-fold increase in tanker traffic, as is required under SARA. Also, Raincoast (our client) filed a study showing that if the project is approved, there is a greater than 50 percent probability that the whale population will drop below 30 in the next 100 years, tantamount to extinction. We aim to set a clear precedent that regulators cannot avoid their legal responsibility to protect endangered species. T2 will add a second container terminal in deep-water by Delta—directly within southern resident killer whale critical habitat. By 2030, the expansion will increase container ship transits through Vancouver’s port and shipping channels by 500 vessels per year. Ecojustice is representing four clients as participants in the environmental assessment for T2. A review panel was recently appointed to conduct a hearing and submit a report and recommendation to Canada’s Minister of Environment and Climate Change, likely by the end of 2017. We will work with our clients and their experts to submit evidence on how increases to vessel traffic will affect southern resident killer whales and other marine species.
$70,000.00
2016

Fair Mining Collaborative

Transboundary watershed protection: building relationships, better laws and public awareness

Our work centers on creating strong, respectful relationships between BC First Nations, Alaska Tribes, and NGO’s on both sides of the border to collaboratively change antiquated ineffective mining laws and policy. Knowledge is power. FMC will provide our proven education program to the CTC, including; Fair Mining Practices: A New Mining Code for British Columbia (FMPC), Mine Medicine Manual (MMM), Fair Mining Training Program (FMTP), and the Northern Secwepemc Tribal Council (NSTC) Mining Policy. Many BC communities already use FMC’s products to increase their understanding of the mining regulatory system, and leverage change through shared decision-making and implementation of innovative best management practices that protect their interests. Very diverse users of FMC’s education program, (Amnesty International to the Tsilhqot’in National Government to Argentinian filmmaker Hernan Vilchez to mining industry organizations), have successfully changed conflicted relationships and made effective changes in regulatory systems. Forward thinking mining companies are recognizing First Nations as decision-making equals, knowing their projects must receive a social license from all affected communities, or the economic viability of their project will be jeopardized. Our work proves that sharing effective tools with the most affected groups, can change the status quo rapidly from the ground up, leaving legislators and recalcitrant industry to catch up.
$80,000.00
2016

Meal Exchange

Real Food Challenge B.C.

Meal Exchange will bring together campus, community, and industry partners to leverage the $20M annual purchasing of B.C.’s campuses to drive demand for ecological agricultural practices-- focusing on improving water quality, wildlife habitat, mitigating climate change-- and improve animal welfare. To do this, we are adapting the award-winning Real Food Challenge from the U.S. to B.C. It w ill shift authority and resource flows on campuses, while also changing beliefs systems about the priorities of institutional procurement, through: -The Real Food Campus Commitment: university presidents publicly commit to the goal of purchasing 20% Real Food within 3 years, mandating foodservice companies and campus administration to change procurement practices. -The Real Food Calculator: provides a rigorous definition and process, based on existing industry certifications, to audit purchasing and identify areas of improvement to reach 20% Real Food on campus. Building off one-year seed funding from Real Estate Foundation and Vancity to test the program with 6 pilot campuses, support from Vancouver Foundation will allow us to adapt and sustain this program at all 11 universities in B.C. The Test grant’s funding through 2019 will give us the runway needed to measure results-- developing the evaluation tools and data to demonstrate the impact of campus purchasing on B.C.’s environment-- and establish long-term funding with campuses to scale the program across B.C. and Canada.
$75,000.00
2016

Miistakis Institute for the Rockies Inc.

Road Watch BC: Involving people in getting animals safely across the road.

Our program will integrate science, technology and innovation to address biodiversity loss associated with roads through the establishment of a citizen science program. Road Watch BC will enable the driving public to generate a large and spatially precise dataset of wildlife observations associated with Highway 3, using a smartphone application that allows passengers to immediately upload wildlife sightings and collisions to our on-line database.This information can then be shared with government agencies, scientists, civil society organizations, communities and local governments and to inform mitigation solutions, promote local awareness of crossing locations and change driving behavior. This program will influence systemic change by altering the flow of resources and how people behave. A citizen science approach improves the fluidity of knowledge and democratizes science by enabling the public to participate in information collection, analysis and sharing. Citizen science programming fosters dialogue within a community and builds engagement around a challenge, ultimately improving the diversity of stakeholders engaged in developing solutions. In addition, we expect to see behavior change whereby participants will know where wildlife are most common along the highway enabling modification of driving behavior. We also expect participants to have a general heightened awareness of the risk of wildlife-vehicle collisions, and to adjust their behavior accordingly.
$75,000.00
2016

Proton Foundation

Honour:Health to Hand - "Totems in the Forest"

Honor:Health to Hand is OMVC’s commitment & response to community requests to aid with healthy development, diversify the economic base for homes & community & offer a culturally appropriate exemplary positive initiative to transfer skills & knowledge from Elder to youth, as it is well recognized that all on-reserve aboriginal youth are at risk & the oral traditions are at risk of dying. We will engage 8 Haida youth, including male & females & those with disabilities, with 3 Master Carvers in a 27-week cultural training/skill development initiative. It includes certification courses, mentorship, health & entrepreneurial aspects; offered at NorthWest Community College Campus in Masset, the high school trade shop, OMVC’s education/ eco-tourism facility-Hiellen Longhouse Village, the carving studio in Old Massett, & Emily Carr UofAD. Endorsed & mentored by Master Carvers Chief 7idansuu Jim Hart & Christian White youth will earn certificates, learn Haida art design/carving/business skills & assist in 2 projects; replication of the historic heritage Hliialang’inagee gyaa’ang Totem that stood in Hiellen Village 150+ years ago & develop a “Welcome Sign” with two small 8’ totems for the entrance to Hiellen Longhouse Village, approved by the Haida Repatriation Society. This will be exemplary, inclusive & engaging. At completion both will be erected during a high Haida celebration during Canada 150. Youth & elders will participate. Healing & reconciliation for all will be profound.
$75,000.00
2016

Tides Canada Initiatives Society

Campaign Accelerator

Campaign Accelerator (“CA”) seeks to change how people act in the political arena to ensure their environmental values are a key part of the debate. CA’s theory of change is that if organizations visibly mobilize pro-environment voters on election day, then government and opposition will be more inclined to strengthen environmental protection because they believe those voters can be decisive in elections. As parties see how their stance on various environmental issues helped or hurt them in the election in key parts of the Province, government will become more positively responsive to those issues and see the value of a strong environmental track record, resulting in better laws and policies. Engagement organizing (“EO”) is based on the belief that “organized people beats organized money.” BC’s tanker campaign is a prime example, particularly the work of Dogwood Initiative to mobilize thousands through locally-grounded organizing nodes across the Province. The 2013 BC election saw all parties wanting to “look strong” on tankers in response to this force. CA flips this approach on its head: training and mentoring grassroots leaders so they can apply EO tools on local environmental issues. CA is building a network of community leaders using EO to enable local citizens to hold their elected officials to account and ensure government recognizes that environmental values (beyond big campaigns like tankers) are widespread and can move voters. The 2017 election is a first test.
$70,000.00
2016

Vancity Community Foundation

Code Red: Testing a “CARP” approach to B.C.’s affordability crisis

Political systems respond to those who organize and show up – at the ballot box and in between elections. While aging Canadians have long had umbrella advocacy groups persistently advancing their interests, younger Canadians have not. Our "CARP for younger Canada" approach tests what we can achieve by filling that gap. We'll influence systemic change via 4 key levers: How we act - we'll engage younger British Columbians in non-partisan, evidence-based political organizing. Our public Code Red campaign will be a catalyst. Beliefs – along the way we'll tackle the belief that younger people are entitled, lazy, etc. (i.e. individually at-fault) and replace it with a belief that society is holding us back by failing to invest in us; via earned media, extensive community presentations, and our website, social and email channels. Resource flows – we'll channel the above to spur increased public investment in younger Canadians, guided by an annual analysis. Laws & policies – we'll mobilize support for policies that ease the squeeze, e.g. adequately funded universal child care, extended parental leave, housing market reform and investments. * * Rather than inflexibly committing to a SINGLE policy, we seek opportunities to advance whatever evidence-based policies have in-the-moment traction WITHIN our realm of research & expertise on the social determinants of health. This project has a clear emphasis on housing and family/affordability policy.
$75,000.00
2016